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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Q & A / converting cake recipe into muffins?
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    converting cake recipe into muffins?

    Julesong
    Wed May 22, 2002 2:01 pm
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    I've never tried converting a cake recipe into muffins, and need to know if there's anything I need to watch out for. Anything I need to add in different amounts, etc?

    Thanks!
    P4
    Wed May 22, 2002 2:57 pm
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    Nope - nothing you have to worry about, except baking time. Usually cupcakes are done in 20-25 minutes at 350 degrees F.

    FYI, you never have to alter a cake recipe when baking in a different sized pan than the recipe calls for. Just adjust cooking time, and make sure whatever size pan you use don't fill it more than 2/3 full. The chocolate chiffon cake recipe I posted I make in sheet cakes, jelly rolls, cupcakes, 6", 8", 9", 10", 12" rounds, square cakes, bundt cake, oval cakes - you get the picture.
    Julesong
    Wed May 22, 2002 4:02 pm
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    Thanks! icon_smile.gif
    Steve_G
    Wed May 22, 2002 4:56 pm
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    As a general rule of thumb the larger the pan the less ratio of baking powder to flour. I'll get you the exact amounts later or tommorow
    P4
    Wed May 22, 2002 11:58 pm
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    Quote:

    As a general rule of thumb the larger the pan the less ratio of baking powder to flour. I'll get you the exact amounts later or tommorow


    Where did you learn that? Do you remember the source? Not doubting you, just I've never heard that before, and am curious...
    Lennie
    Thu May 23, 2002 12:45 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Quote:

    Quote:

    As a general rule of thumb the larger the pan the less ratio of baking powder to flour. I'll get you the exact amounts later or tommorow


    Where did you learn that? Do you remember the source? Not doubting you, just I've never heard that before, and am curious...


    I'm curious too ... that's a new one on me icon_smile.gif
    Steve_G
    Thu May 23, 2002 9:07 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Hey PF and Lennie, It's in The Cake Bible by Rose Levy Bernabaum. I copied down the ratios this morning the promptly closed the book with the stickey note still stuck on the page. DUH!

    It has to do with the greater surface tension of the larger pan reducing the need for the levener and it's weaking of the structure. She has 5 different levels for round pans (6 to 18") and one for rectangular pans.

    I did a web search and can not find it, but if anyone has thier copy of The Cake Bible handy it's in one of the back sections on baking 'any sized' wedding cakes. The description is right next to the baking powder table.

    If not I'll bring it in tommorow or jump on tonight from home.

    I hate accessing the internet from home, that modem is SO SLOW!

    Quote:

    Quote:

    Quote:

    As a general rule of thumb the larger the pan the less ratio of baking powder to flour. I'll get you the exact amounts later or tommorow


    Where did you learn that? Do you remember the source? Not doubting you, just I've never heard that before, and am curious...


    I'm curious too ... that's a new one on me icon_smile.gif
    P4
    Thu May 23, 2002 12:41 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    You don't need to post it for me - I have that book so I'll go read that section. Thanks, though! I honestly have never done that, except when taking something from round form to sheet-cake form, where I do reduce the BP (if using it) substantially so I don't get that "hump" in the center.

    I guess I never paid attention because there's only one or two cakes I ever make that have BP in them - both chocolate. Usually, for sheet cakes and for wedding cakes, I make genoise or sponge, and there's no BP in them.
    Steve_G
    Thu May 23, 2002 1:51 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I've always wanted to try making a large genoise. How do you make the large tiers one layer at a time so you can whip enough eggs? How do you fold the egg whites in on a monster like that?

    Quote:

    Usually, for sheet cakes and for wedding cakes, I make genoise or sponge, and there's no BP in them.
    MEAN CHEF
    Thu May 23, 2002 7:13 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Quote:

    Quote:

    As a general rule of thumb the larger the pan the less ratio of baking powder to flour. I'll get you the exact amounts later or tommorow


    Where did you learn that? Do you remember the source? Not doubting you, just I've never heard that before, and am curious...

    Cake Bible
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