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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Q & A / Best Baking Stone to Get?
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    Best Baking Stone to Get?

    Teresa M
    Tue Mar 26, 2002 3:28 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I've heard MANY raves about baking stones from people who would never give them up. What is the best size and kind to get and where do you get it?
    Spoongal
    Tue Mar 26, 2002 8:07 am
    Food.com Groupie
    They're all good, but if you want an inexpensive alternative--I just line an oven rack with unglazed Italian terra cotta quarry tiles. Works the same, for just pennies. And you can even cut them to fit so you have a larger surface than most of the stones provide. If you're happy with the results, you could always upgrade to a 'real' stone, but you may not want to--the tiles are very convenient.
    Teresa M
    Tue Mar 26, 2002 9:45 am
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    Quote:

    They're all good, but if you want an inexpensive alternative--I just line an oven rack with unglazed Italian terra cotta quarry tiles. Works the same, for just pennies. And you can even cut them to fit so you have a larger surface than most of the stones provide. If you're happy with the results, you could always upgrade to a 'real' stone, but you may not want to--the tiles are very convenient.

    Thank you Trennary O'More! My husband uses good quality cooking utensils/pans, but we can't afford an expensive stone right now, thank you for a great alternative.
    Teresa
    Teresa M
    Tue Mar 26, 2002 10:03 am
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    Thank you, this question was well-answered by Trennary O'More and Tracy K, so I'm ending it, thank you!
    hokiegal
    Tue Mar 26, 2002 10:15 am
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    Teresa, I know you ended the post -but I wanted to tell you that I got a round baking stone at Costco for about $13 (I already had one from pampered Chef for about $25) Once seasoned they both work the same. The one from Costco came with a nice rack and a good pizza cutter. If you have a costco near you, you might look into it
    Teresa M
    Tue Mar 26, 2002 10:20 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Thank you hokiegal, I welcome all advice, whether the question was ended or not.

    No, we don't have a Cosco here, but I appreciate your good advice, probably someone else has a Costco near them and that will help them. I know that eventually that we Will get a Real baking stone... my husband loves to cook too and likes "good stuff" to cook with.

    Thanks Again,
    Teresa
    Tracy K
    Tue Mar 26, 2002 11:51 am
    Food.com Groupie
    The tiles are a "real" baking stone, you definitely wouldn't need to graduate to another product.

    I actually find them a lot more convenient than a large stone as I can customize the size (ie, use all six tiles for something large like a pizza, or just use three for a loaf of bread), and when they get too filthy to clean (which doesn't happen to all 6 at once) I can just buy another one for $0.60. Also, I can store them in a stack and not have to find space for a large, heavy stone.

    icon_smile.gif
    StevenHB
    Tue Mar 26, 2002 12:36 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I use unglazed quarry tiles that I get from Home Depot. I like the fact that if I don't want to use them, that I can stack them up in a corner of the oven or on top of the fridge.

    When they get dirty, I just run them through the oven's self-cleaning cycle and they come out clean.

    I have broken some - if I need to create oven steam for a bread, I'll put a tile on a stove burner (I have electric) and heat the tile up. I can then pick it up with tongs and drop it in a pan of boiling water in the oven. This creates a lot of steam but sometimes causes the tile to break. At US$0.60, who cares?

    Julia Child suggested this approach in one of the volumes of Mastering the Art of French Cooking; though, she suggested using a brick, which would be a lot harder to pick up with tongs.

    How do you cut tile?
    Teresa M
    Tue Mar 26, 2002 12:50 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Quote:

    The tiles are a "real" baking stone, you definitely wouldn't need to graduate to another product.

    I actually find them a lot more convenient than a large stone as I can customize the size (ie, use all six tiles for something large like a pizza, or just use three for a loaf of bread), and when they get too filthy to clean (which doesn't happen to all 6 at once) I can just buy another one for $0.60. Also, I can store them in a stack and not have to find space for a large, heavy stone.

    icon_smile.gif

    I'm sorry Tracy, I didn't understand that the unglazed quarry tiles are just as good as a baking stone. I especially appreciate the "custom-size" option to what you're baking, and the easy storage and easy inexpensive replacement. Thank-you and everyone else for your help. Okay, 1 last question on this, what is the best way to clean them?
    Tracy K
    Tue Mar 26, 2002 1:28 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Quote:

    Okay, 1 last question on this, what is the best way to clean them?


    StevenHB runs them through the self-clean cycle on the oven... I don't have that option so I usually just soak them in hot water and give them a good scrub, then dry them in a hot oven for 15-20 minutes... I have also run the through the dishwasher but that didn't seem to work.

    Honestly, when they get too scungy (is that a word, LOL?) I'll probably just pitch them and replace them.
    gperls
    Thu Mar 28, 2002 7:44 am
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    Don't clean your stone with soap, it'll impart a soapy flavor to your food. Just scrape off the "chunks" with a plastic scraper. A mature stone will be nearly all black. That's it's seasoning. It'd be a shame to throw it away just because it's discolored
    hokiegal
    Thu Mar 28, 2002 10:02 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I think I will have to get some tiles also. I never use my old "cookie sheets" anymore(except for juicy sruff). I bake EVERYTHING on stones and it would be nice to have different sizes for different things.
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