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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / Don't let this hurt your head...
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    Don't let this hurt your head...

    Red Apple Guy
    Thu Nov 07, 2013 11:42 am
    Forum Host
    ...but the chart below has some interesting information in it for sourdough lovers. Using a sourdough starter with L. sanfranciscensis and C. milleri yeast, a guy measured the growth of these at various temperatures.

    What I see in the results when sourdough is fermenting are:
    -Yeast grows fastest at 80F but slows way down above that
    -Bacteria grows faster than yeast above 77F, making for more sour dough
    -Below 65F, yeast growth is slow and bacteria growth is slightly faster, making more sour dough. The dip in the yeast curve at 60F is probably not real - an outlier.
    -Yeast grows twice as fast at 80F as it does at 65F
    -Since I don't care for overly sour bread, I'll stick with 70 - 75F for fermenting
    -You already knew that 70 to 75 was a good fermenting temperature, didn't you?

    from http://www.nyx.net/~dgreenw/whatistherelationshipbetwe.html

    Donna M.
    Thu Nov 07, 2013 1:19 pm
    Forum Host
    Thanks for posting that, Red. It makes so much more sense when you see it in graph form!
    Bonnie G #2
    Fri Nov 08, 2013 8:57 am
    Food.com Groupie
    OMG!!! So if I'm understanding this (which I doubt) if I have the warmer temp I get a stronger sourdough flavor???
    Red Apple Guy
    Fri Nov 08, 2013 10:48 am
    Forum Host
    That's the way I read it.

    Has anyone experienced this?

    Red
    sloe cooker
    Sat Nov 09, 2013 12:44 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Just how do you figure out the hydration percentage of a recipe?
    Red Apple Guy
    Sat Nov 09, 2013 7:43 am
    Forum Host
    You divide the weight of the liquids by the weight of the flours. If the recipe is 300 g water and 500 g flour, the hydration is 60%.


    Last edited by Red Apple Guy on Sat Nov 09, 2013 8:10 am, edited 1 time in total
    sloe cooker
    Sat Nov 09, 2013 7:59 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Thanks Red, that is awesome and I do understand, I think icon_lol.gif
    It is when I notice that you, or anyone else just kinda throws out there that such-n-such dough is 74 percent or 82...hydration, do you know that info off the top of your head? If so...I BOW icon_lol.gif

    Now off to work
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