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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Middle East & North Africa / Welcome to Turkey! November AND December 2013!
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    Welcome to Turkey! November AND December 2013!

    Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next Page >>
    Elmotoo
    Wed Oct 30, 2013 3:23 pm
    Forum Host


    Turkish cuisine is largely the heritage of Ottoman cuisine, which can be described as a fusion and refinement of Central Asian, Middle Eastern and Balkan cuisines. Turkish cuisine has in turn influenced those and other neighboring cuisines, including those of Western Europe. The Ottomans fused various culinary traditions of their realm with influences from Middle Eastern cuisines, along with traditional Turkic elements from Central Asia (such as yogurt), creating a vast array of specialties - many with strong regional associations.

    Turkish cuisine varies across the country. The cooking of Istanbul, Bursa, Izmir, and rest of the Aegean region inherits many elements of Ottoman court cuisine, with a lighter use of spices, a preference for rice over bulgur, and a wider use of seafoods. The cuisine of the Black Sea Region uses fish extensively, especially the Black Sea anchovy (hamsi), has been influenced by Balkan and Slavic cuisine, and includes maize dishes. The cuisine of the southeast—Urfa, Gaziantep and Adana—is famous for its kebabs, mezes and dough-based desserts such as baklava, kadayıf and künefe (kanafeh).

    Especially in the western parts of Turkey, where olive trees grow abundantly, olive oil is the major type of oil used for cooking. The cuisines of the Aegean, Marmara and Mediterranean regions are rich in vegetables, herbs, and fish. Central Anatolia has many famous specialties, such as keşkek (kashkak), mantı (especially from Kayseri) and gözleme.

    A specialty's name sometimes includes that of a city or region, either in or outside of Turkey, and may refer to the specific technique or ingredients used in that area. For example, the difference between urfa kebab and adana kebab is the thickness of the skewer and the amount of hot pepper that kebab contains. Urfa kebab is less spicy and thicker than adana kebab.

    Breakfast ~ the most important meal of the day!
    Turks usually prefer a simple breakfast. A typical Turkish breakfast consists of cheese (beyaz peynir, kaşar etc.), butter, olives, eggs, tomatoes, cucumbers, jam, honey, and kaymak. Sujuk (spicy Turkish sausage, can be eaten with eggs), pastırma, börek, simit, poğaça and soups are eaten as a morning meal in Turkey. A common Turkish speciality for breakfast is called menemen, which is prepared with tomatoes, green peppers, onion, olive oil and eggs. Invariably, Turkish tea is served at breakfast. The Turkish word for breakfast, kahvaltı, means "before coffee" (kahve, 'coffee'; altı, 'under').

    Key ingredients
    Frequently used ingredients in Turkish specialties include: lamb, beef, chicken, fish, eggplants, green peppers, onions, garlic, lentils, beans, and tomatoes. Nuts, especially pistachios, chestnuts, almonds, hazelnuts, and walnuts, together with spices, have a special place in Turkish cuisine, and are used extensively in desserts or eaten separately. Preferred spices and herbs include parsley, cumin, black pepper, paprika, mint, oregano, red pepper, allspice, and thyme.
    ........................................................................
    The rich and diverse flora of Turkey means that fruit is varied, abundant and cheap. In Ottoman cuisine, fruit frequently accompanied meat as a side dish. Plums, apricots, pomegranates, pears, apples, grapes, and figs, along with many kinds of citrus are the most frequently used fruit, either fresh or dried, in Turkish cuisine. compote or hoşaf (from Persian khosh âb, literally meaning "nice water") are among the main side dishes to meat or pilav. Dolma and pilaf usually contain currants or raisins. Etli yaprak sarma (vine leaves stuffed with meat and rice) used to be cooked with sour plums in Ottoman cuisine. Turkish desserts do not normally contain fresh fruit, but may contain dried varieties. Eggplant has a special place in the Turkish cuisine.

    In some regions, meat, which was mostly eaten only at wedding ceremonies or during the Kurban Bayramı (Eid ul-Adha) as etli pilav (pilaf with meat), has become part of the daily diet since the introduction of industrial production. Veal, formerly shunned, is now widely consumed.
    The main use of meat in cooking remains the combination of ground meat and vegetable, with names such as kıymalı fasulye (beans with ground meat) or kıymalı ıspanak (spinach with ground meat, which is almost always served with yogurt).
    Alternatively, in coastal towns, cheap fish such as sardines (sardalya) or hamsi (anchovies) are widely available, as well as many others with seasonal availability. Poultry consumption, almost exclusively of chicken and eggs, is common. Milk-fed lambs, once the most popular source of meat in Turkey, comprise a small part of contemporary consumption. Kuzu çevirme, cooking milk-fed lamb on a spit, once an important ceremony, is rarely seen.
    Because it is currently a predominantly Islamic land, pork plays no role in contemporary Turkish cuisine.
    .....................................................................
    Yogurt is an important element in Turkish cuisine. In fact, the English word yogurt or yogurt derives from the Turkish word yoğurt. Yogurt can accompany almost all meat dishes (kebabs, köfte), vegetable dishes (especially fried eggplant, courgette, spinach with minced meat etc.), meze and a specialty called mantı (folded triangles of dough containing minced meat). In villages, yogurt is regularly eaten with rice or bread. A thicker, higher-fat variety, süzme yoğurt or "strained yogurt", is made by straining the yogurt curds from the whey. One of the most common Turkish drinks, ayran, is made from yogurt. Also, yogurt is often used in the preparation of cakes, some soups and pastries.

    Turkey produces many varieties of cheese, mostly from sheep's milk. In general, these cheeses are not long matured, with a comparatively low fat content. The production of many kinds of cheese is local to particular regions.

    A Turkish meal usually starts with a thin soup (çorba). Soups are usually named after their main ingredient, the most common types being; mercimek (lentil) çorbası, yogurt, or wheat (often mashed) called tarhana çorbası. Delicacy soups are the ones that are usually not the part of the daily diet, such as İşkembe soup and paça çorbası, although the latter also used to be consumed as a nutritious winter meal. Before the popularisation of the typical Turkish breakfast, soup was the default morning meal for some people.

    Vegetables ~
    A vegetable dish can be a main course in a Turkish meal. A large variety of vegetables are used, such as spinach, leek, cauliflower, artichoke, cabbage, celery, eggplant, green and red bell peppers, string bean and jerusalem artichoke. Dolma is the name used for stuffed vegetables. Like the vegetables cooked with olive oil as described above dolma with olive oil does not contain meat. Many vegetables are stuffed, most typically green peppers (biber dolması), eggplants, tomatoes, courgettes. Turşu is pickle made with brine, usually with the addition of garlic. It is often enjoyed as an appetizer. It is made with a large variety of vegetables, from cucumber to courgette. In the towns on the Aegean coast, the water of turşu is consumed as a drink. It comes from the Persian "Torshi", which refers to pickled "Torsh" (sour) vegetables. Meze is a selection of food served as the appetizer course with or without drinks. Some of them can be served as a main course as well.

    for more detail, go here!

    .....................................................................

    our cookbook: Turkish Delights November 2013 #754032 ~it's a work in progress...feel free to post any Turkish recipes!


    Last edited by Elmotoo on Sun Dec 29, 2013 10:08 pm, edited 1 time in total
    Elmotoo
    Wed Oct 30, 2013 3:25 pm
    Forum Host
    ....................~TAGS~

    11/1
    Annacia:
    icon_biggrin.gif Turkish Shrimp Pilaf #32876 by Derf
    icon_biggrin.gif Poached Apples With Almonds and Yogurt #173147 by Bayhill
    icon_biggrin.gif Constantine Coffee #422638 by Napoleon Dynamite
    icon_biggrin.gif Turkish Hazelnuts #232883 by Chef Kate
    icon_biggrin.gif Cookgirl - Turkish Red Lentil Soup #140836 by justcallmetoni

    11/4
    icon_biggrin.gif Annacia - Turkish Coffee Mocha #508830 by Sharon123

    11/10
    CG - Turkish Poached Eggs With Yogurt and Spicy Sage Butter by mercy


    11/11
    icon_biggrin.gif elmotoo - Turkish Poached Eggs With Yogurt and Spicy Sage Butter #119959 by Mercy

    11/28
    awalde:
    icon_biggrin.gif Borekitas De Berengena #255300 Susiecat too
    icon_biggrin.gif Turkish Coffee Mocha #508830 By Sharon123

    12/2
    icon_biggrin.gif awalde Chargrilled Vegetable and Haloumi Salad #503853 By **Jubes**


    Last edited by Elmotoo on Sat Nov 23, 2013 4:11 pm, edited 3 times in total
    Elmotoo
    Wed Oct 30, 2013 3:26 pm
    Forum Host
    Just in Case
    Annacia
    Fri Nov 01, 2013 1:28 pm
    Forum Host
    I'm here. I slept in and got a really late start this morning. icon_redface.gif

    Tagging:

    First, is honor of Derf
    Turkish Shrimp Pilaf #32876 by Derf
    Poached Apples With Almonds and Yogurt #173147 by Bayhill
    Constantine Coffee #422638 by Napoleon Dynamite
    Turkish Hazelnuts #232883 by Chef Kate
    Elmotoo
    Fri Nov 01, 2013 2:03 pm
    Forum Host
    Annacia wrote:
    I'm here. I slept in and got a really late start this morning. icon_redface.gif

    Tagging:

    First, is honor of Derf
    Turkish Shrimp Pilaf #32876 by Derf
    Poached Apples With Almonds and Yogurt #173147 by Bayhill
    Constantine Coffee #422638 by Napoleon Dynamite
    Turkish Hazelnuts #232883 by Chef Kate

    Wonderful, Annacia! Why don't we set up a separate space for recipes made in honor of Derf?

    Remember folks, the cookbook is NOT complete so feel free to search Turkish recipes. If you're wondering, post us a link & we'll confirm or deny their eligibilty. icon_smile.gif

    Happy cooking!
    Beth
    Annacia
    Fri Nov 01, 2013 2:10 pm
    Forum Host
    Elmotoo wrote:
    Annacia wrote:
    I'm here. I slept in and got a really late start this morning. icon_redface.gif

    Tagging:

    First, is honor of Derf
    Turkish Shrimp Pilaf #32876 by Derf
    Poached Apples With Almonds and Yogurt #173147 by Bayhill
    Constantine Coffee #422638 by Napoleon Dynamite
    Turkish Hazelnuts #232883 by Chef Kate

    Wonderful, Annacia! Why don't we set up a separate space for recipes made in honor of Derf?

    Remember folks, the cookbook is NOT complete so feel free to search Turkish recipes. If you're wondering, post us a link & we'll confirm or deny their eligibilty. icon_smile.gif

    Happy cooking!
    Beth


    See, you knew there was a reason to save a work slot. icon_wink.gif
    Cookgirl
    Fri Nov 01, 2013 4:01 pm
    Forum Host
    It's about flippin' time!



    Helloooooooooooo, Turkey!
    Annacia
    Fri Nov 01, 2013 4:05 pm
    Forum Host
    rotfl.gif
    Cookgirl
    Fri Nov 01, 2013 4:06 pm
    Forum Host
    Since it's soup season now and I have a surplus of lentils, CG will
    make this:


    Turkish Red Lentil Soup by justcallmetoni
    Annacia
    Fri Nov 01, 2013 4:11 pm
    Forum Host
    I'm planning to get to that one too. icon_wink.gif
    K9 Owned
    Fri Nov 01, 2013 5:03 pm
    Forum Host
    wave.gif Turkey!!!

    I lived in Istanbul for a year and just loved the food.
    I will be back later to tag some recipes. icon_cool.gif

    So glad that you put this on fb Bethie!
    Annacia
    Fri Nov 01, 2013 5:10 pm
    Forum Host
    Welcome K9

    I'd love to hear all about Istanbul. I had a chance to go there for a week long photo shoot. I just couldn't manage the cost. icon_sad.gif
    Annacia
    Fri Nov 01, 2013 5:13 pm
    Forum Host
    Bethie, I was going to make the work slot for Derf but I'm pretty sure I only saw the one recipe of hers when I was shopping the book.
    Elmotoo
    Sat Nov 02, 2013 1:14 pm
    Forum Host
    Cookgirl wrote:
    It's about flippin' time!



    Helloooooooooooo, Turkey!
    rotfl.gif welcome home! I'll get your tag noted icon_smile.gif
    Elmotoo
    Sat Nov 02, 2013 1:15 pm
    Forum Host
    Annacia wrote:
    Bethie, I was going to make the work slot for Derf but I'm pretty sure I only saw the one recipe of hers when I was shopping the book.


    not a problem icon_smile.gif
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