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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Critter Cafe / Yay for Saralaya!!!!!
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    Yay for Saralaya!!!!!

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    Saralaya
    Sun Sep 15, 2013 8:39 pm
    Forum Host
    Part One : What is the difference between "Jewish Food " and "Kosher Food"? There is one but in order to explain the difference, you need to know what "kosher" is all about.

    This is straight from Wikipedia since they have a good explanation:

    "The laws of keeping kosher (kashrut) have influenced Jewish cooking by prescribing what foods are permitted and how food must be prepared. The word kosher is usually translated as "proper."

    Certain foods, notably pork and shellfish, are forbidden; meat and dairy may not be combined, and meat must be ritually slaughtered and salted to remove all traces of blood.

    Observant Jews will eat only meat or poultry that is certified kosher. The meat must have been slaughtered by a shochet (ritual slaughterer) in accordance with Jewish law and is entirely drained of blood. Before it is cooked, it is soaked in water for half an hour, then placed on a perforated board, sprinkled with coarse salt (which draws out the blood), and left to sit for one hour. At the end of this time, the salt is washed off and the meat is ready for cooking. Today, kosher meats purchased from a butcher or supermarket are usually already kashered as described above, and no additional soaking or salting is required.

    According to kashrut, meat and poultry may not be combined with dairy products, nor may they touch plates or utensils that have been touched by dairy products. Therefore, Jews who observe kashrut divide their kitchens into different sections for meat and for dairy, with separate refrigerators, ovens, plates, and utensils (or as much as is reasonable, given financial and space constraints; there are procedures to kasher utensils that have touched dairy to allow their use for meat).

    As a result, butter, milk and cream are not used in preparing dishes made with meat or intended to be served together with meat. Oil, pareve margarine, rendered chicken fat, or non-dairy cream substitutes are used instead."

    OK are you with me so far? And yes, my tiny little kitchen has two sets of dishes, pots and pans, silverware, utensils etc..... oh and two dish drainers. Thus I have almost no prep room but I manage....LOL

    "Pareve" means neutral... margarines that have no dairy products in them are pareve, oil is pareve, almond milk, soy milk etc are "pareve" because they are vegetable products. All vegetables and fruits are "pareve" or neutral. Grains also, but what you do with them determines whether they stay that way or not.

    Kosher fish is "pareve" but very observant people will serve it on a separate dish from other things or make it a separate course. In order to be kosher a fish must have BOTH fins and scales. It does not have to slaughtered in any special way.


    Sooooo the simple explanation of "Jewish" food that may not be kosher would be brisket of beef from an animal not slaughtered and prepared as Kosher. Or Using dairy products in a meat recipe...like cream-of-whatever soup to prepare a meat dish.


    OK you guys.... is this understandable? Anything else you want to know as a start? Feedback is welcome!!
    mums the word
    Sun Sep 15, 2013 9:11 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Wow, I knew that pork wasn't eaten, but had no idea about the shellfish!
    I can't imagine having two sets of pots and pans, utensils etc. either. My kitchen is so puny, I don't even know how I could deal with that.

    It sounds very complicated but I imagine it is second nature if you were brought up in the faith, as that is how you would have always seen food prepared.

    Am I right in assuming that it would be very expensive to buy meats/food that are kosher? Is this type of meat readily available in your average grocery store or would you need a local butcher shop?

    Thanks for educating us Sarlaya!
    K9 Owned
    Sun Sep 15, 2013 9:19 pm
    Forum Host
    I think it is an interesting and educational post.
    I'd go with it as is and leave it open to questions. THERE - not here though. We can just carrying on asking you 'stuff' icon_cool.gif
    Happy Harry #2
    Sun Sep 15, 2013 10:00 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Thus, all Kosher food is Jewish but not all Jewish food is kosher. When speaking of just Jewish food, it is a combination of different nations and their contribution. It does not have to follow strict rules.
    K9 Owned
    Sun Sep 15, 2013 10:16 pm
    Forum Host
    Just a thought though Saralaya. If you post here and answer all of our questions we will have no need to go there. Won't be so good for your forum.
    Connie Lea
    Sun Sep 15, 2013 10:52 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Congrats Saralaya. I lived with a Jewish family for a year while I was going to business college (I babysat their three little boys for room and board.) She didn't cook Kosher except maybe for some of the Jewish holidays, but she did make an awesome beef stroganoff. One of the boys wouldn't eat it, would only eat the noodles plain. Poor kid didn't know what he was missing.
    conniecooks
    Mon Sep 16, 2013 9:32 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I suppose the beef stroganoff would not have sour cream as that would not be kosher. Very interesting, I already new most of this, I have had a lot of Jewish friends and bosses over the years,
    Saralaya
    Mon Sep 16, 2013 9:45 am
    Forum Host
    mums the word wrote:
    Wow, I knew that pork wasn't eaten, but had no idea about the shellfish!
    I can't imagine having two sets of pots and pans, utensils etc. either. My kitchen is so puny, I don't even know how I could deal with that.

    It sounds very complicated but I imagine it is second nature if you were brought up in the faith, as that is how you would have always seen food prepared.

    Am I right in assuming that it would be very expensive to buy meats/food that are kosher? Is this type of meat readily available in your average grocery store or would you need a local butcher shop?

    Thanks for educating us Sarlaya!


    It's definitely easier if you grew up that way but I know people who have learned later in life and once you get used to it it's easier than it sounds. Buying Kosher meat and poultry is more expensive than non-kosher but not much more than "organic" meats that I see in the grocery stores. There are kosher butchers but there are also nationally branded kosher meat and poultry (mostly Empire: http://www.empirekosher.com/ ) that can be bought less expensively. Trader Joe's has this much much cheaper than anyone else!
    Saralaya
    Mon Sep 16, 2013 9:47 am
    Forum Host
    conniecooks wrote:
    I suppose the beef stroganoff would not have sour cream as that would not be kosher. Very interesting, I already new most of this, I have had a lot of Jewish friends and bosses over the years,


    Nope... no sour cream! That is one difference between "kosher-style" and "jewish" food vs kosher. There are "jewish" deli's that make great corned beef but also Reubens.... icon_eek.gif no cheese on meat any place kosher... LOL
    Saralaya
    Mon Sep 16, 2013 9:49 am
    Forum Host
    K9 Owned wrote:
    Just a thought though Saralaya. If you post here and answer all of our questions we will have no need to go there. Won't be so good for your forum.


    Thanks for all your feedback... you are right K9-- I am going to go post over there (but I would answer some q's here too)
    Saralaya
    Mon Sep 16, 2013 9:56 am
    Forum Host
    OK..... it's posted over in the Kosher Forum! icon_biggrin.gif
    Chef shapeweaver ©
    Mon Sep 16, 2013 10:38 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Hi Sara, wave.gif
    And CONGRATS !!! icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif
    Saralaya
    Mon Sep 16, 2013 10:44 am
    Forum Host
    Chef shapeweaver © wrote:
    Hi Sara, wave.gif
    And CONGRATS !!! icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif


    Thanks so much! You guys are terrific...you have been so encouraging, I really appreciate it! icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif
    Studentchef
    Mon Sep 16, 2013 6:35 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Mazel Tov!

    And Shana Tova to Saralaya and everyone who celebrates the Jewish holidays!
    Chattes
    Thu Sep 19, 2013 4:30 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Congratulations Saralaya! I know you will breath fresh air into the Kosher forum. I don't go into the other forums anymore with all the issues they seem to have but I certainly will be lurking in the Kosher forum with you there.
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