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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / Vital Gluten
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    Vital Gluten

    ala-kat
    Wed Apr 24, 2013 1:29 am
    Food.com Groupie
    My question may be jumping the gun somewhat...but I have this question. I gave my mother my bread maker as I really have no place to put it, and wasn't it using it. She has finally become interested so I ordered a cookbook of 300 bread machine recipes. Something I would think she would take to. On closer inspection of the reviews (and this is a highly rated cookbook), it is mentioned numerous times the addition of gluten. I can't speak for others, but vital gluten is not something I, nor anyone I know, has used in baking. Is this an ingredient that can be left out, and to what detriment? Going only by the reviews, it seems it is used in most recipes, but I don't know just yet.

    Thanks icon_biggrin.gif
    Dee514
    Wed Apr 24, 2013 2:00 am
    Forum Host
    Yes, it can be left out if you prefer. Of course you will get the best results from a recipe calling for it if you use it.

    Vital Wheat Gluten is the natural protein found in wheat. It contains 75% protein. A small amount added to yeast bread recipes improves the texture and elasticity of the dough. This is often used by commercial bakeries to produce light textured breads, and can easily put the home bread baker on a par with the professionals. Vital Wheat Gluten can also be used to make a meat substitute known as seitan.
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    Vital wheat gluten provides the extra gluten that whole-grain loaves need to rise their highest. It's particularly helpful with loaves that have low-gluten whole grain flours, such as rye, oat, teff, spelt, or buckwheat.

    A tablespoon or two added to whole wheat, rye, oatmeal, or other whole-grain breads strengthens structure while lightening texture and promoting a good rise.
    Vital wheat gluten will absorb moisture from the dough; you may need to adjust the dough's consistency by adding another tablespoon of water.
    ala-kat
    Wed Apr 24, 2013 2:10 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Dee514 wrote:
    Yes, it can be left out if you prefer. Of course you will get the best results from a recipe calling for it if you use it.

    Vital Wheat Gluten is the natural protein found in wheat. It contains 75% protein. A small amount added to yeast bread recipes improves the texture and elasticity of the dough. This is often used by commercial bakeries to produce light textured breads, and can easily put the home bread baker on a par with the professionals. Vital Wheat Gluten can also be used to make a meat substitute known as seitan.
    ````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````
    Vital wheat gluten provides the extra gluten that whole-grain loaves need to rise their highest. It's particularly helpful with loaves that have low-gluten whole grain flours, such as rye, oat, teff, spelt, or buckwheat.

    A tablespoon or two added to whole wheat, rye, oatmeal, or other whole-grain breads strengthens structure while lightening texture and promoting a good rise.
    Vital wheat gluten will absorb moisture from the dough; you may need to adjust the dough's consistency by adding another tablespoon of water.


    Thank you so much for the answer. First, she won't be using the flours mentioned, at least for a while. I will wait to see if she keeps this up, and I think she will. I've looked online, and it comes in a 3 1/2 lb package icon_eek.gif icon_eek.gif More than she would ever use in her lifetime, my lifetime, her grandkids lifetime... Will have to see if it is available locally in a much smaller package. While I know she would want to make the best bread possible, it is nice to know there is a little room for compromise.

    Thank you again icon_biggrin.gif
    duonyte
    Wed Apr 24, 2013 11:10 am
    Forum Host
    The Bob's Red Mill and Arrowhead and Hodgson Mill packages that I find at the grocery store are all around 1 lb. Keep in the fridge in an airtight container. I've also found it at WalMart. If your mom wants to use just all-purpose flour, and not bread flour, the vital wheat gluten will make the ap flour equivalent to bread flour - just add a teaspoon or so per cup of a-p flour.
    duonyte
    Wed Apr 24, 2013 11:19 am
    Forum Host
    You can also find it at bulk food and health food stores.
    Donna M.
    Wed Apr 24, 2013 12:37 pm
    Forum Host
    Yes, look in the health food store, in their bulk food section. I have bought it this way for years, a few ounces at a time. That being said, I rarely ever use the stuff! I keep it in the freezer, just in case.
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