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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Contests & Events / My Food Odyssey ~ May and June 2013
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    My Food Odyssey ~ May and June 2013

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    Sharon123
    Thu May 02, 2013 12:26 pm
    Forum Host
    American Samoa, also known as the heart of Polynesia, is a group of six islands in the South Pacific. It is a dazzling island nation bounded with affluent culture and natural surroundings.


    Fruits and Vegetables



    The tropics are known for their wide variety of fruits and American Samoa is no exception. Papayas, mangoes, pineapple and coconut are widely grown throughout the country, as well as durian, banana and breadfruit. Fruit is traditionally eaten at breakfast in American Samoa and is incorporated into sweet and savory dishes. Vegetables are also widely grown and available, although they do not play as important a role as fruit. Taro leaf is the most widespread vegetable traditionally eaten in the country, followed by yams and manioc. One of the most popular vegetable imports to American Samoa is the onion. Since their introduction, onions have become a favored ingredient in traditional and modern cuisine.
    Traditional Dishes



    Although more and more citizens of American Samoa are eating a typically mainland American diet, some traditional dishes continue to maintain popularity. Palusami, or lu'au, is one of American Samoa's most popular and well-known dishes. It consists of cooked taro leaves, coconut cream and onions folded into whole, uncooked taro leaves and placed to cook in an umu, or pit-oven. It is a common dish at fia fia celebrations where it is served with roasted suckling pig. Another common traditional dish is supoesi, a breakfast soup made from pawpaw fruit and coconut cream. Povi masima is Samoan salted beef, which is still eaten throughout the island nation. Many traditional dishes in American Samoa are accompanied by an all purpose sauce made of onions and coconut cream called pe'epe'e.


    Beverages



    The national drink of American Samoa is a fermented drink called kava, which is made from the roots of a local pepper plant. It is served in sacred ceremonies, as well as being an offering to village elders. There is special etiquette involved in drinking kava, which must be adhered to. First, when it is served a small amount must be poured on the ground directly in front of you while saying the word "manuia," meaning "good luck." Do not drink all of the contents of the cup, instead reserving a small amount at the end to be poured out as an offering.
    threeovens
    Thu May 02, 2013 12:26 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Satyne wrote:
    Well, I was going to make us a cookbook for this event, but after seeing your menu's 3ovens, I'm liking that idea a lot more. Since you have already set some up for this round, would you like to be the Menu master?


    I'll try.
    Satyne
    Thu May 02, 2013 4:12 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    threeovens wrote:
    Satyne wrote:
    Well, I was going to make us a cookbook for this event, but after seeing your menu's 3ovens, I'm liking that idea a lot more. Since you have already set some up for this round, would you like to be the Menu master?


    I'll try.


    I probably should have said for this round. Lol. It would probably be a little crazy for the whole thing. I can look after it if you would prefer. I discovered that we can upload small photos to descriptions
    Satyne
    Thu May 02, 2013 10:49 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Sharon123 wrote:
    American Samoa, also known as the heart of Polynesia, is a group of six islands in the South Pacific. It is a dazzling island nation bounded with affluent culture and natural surroundings.




    Wow, this looks wonderful.
    breezermom
    Sat May 04, 2013 11:52 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Just want to make sure I'm clear, it is one recipe for each region, not one recipe from each country?
    momaphet
    Sat May 04, 2013 1:26 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    breezermom wrote:
    Just want to make sure I'm clear, it is one recipe for each region, not one recipe from each country?


    I think we're going for at least 1 per country since we'll be in each group for 2 months.
    momaphet
    Sat May 04, 2013 1:30 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I found this site for Samoa

    http://www.samoafood.com/

    An excerpt from the home page

    Samoa is a group of islands in the South Pacific, home to some of the smiliest people in the world. Samoan people love to joke around, sing, dance and are serious about three things in life: God, family and food.

    Every major life event is marked with a feast, and every Sunday we have to'ona'i, which is lunch with a capital L. It's the only meal of the day, with people waking up in the wee hours of the morning to get it cooked in time for church, and to'ona'i is usually so filling that all we do afterwards is sleep.

    Samoans don't skimp on regular weekday meals either. Roasted chicken, homemade vegetable soups, smoky bbq and fresh fish salad (ota) were all regulars on my family's menu. My parents weren't exactly rolling in money (ask me later what a fa'alavelave is), but there was always plenty of food on the table.

    Samoan food today shows some clear historical influences, mostly European and Chinese. Classic dishes like umu (oven-pit-baked food), sapasui (chop suey), and puligi (pudding) have not changed much over the last few decades, whereas some dishes have not stood the test of time, such as suamasi (cracker soup).

    http://www.samoafood.com/p/recipes.html
    momaphet
    Sat May 04, 2013 1:31 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I'm a little bit confused are we making any recipe from any website that is appropriate to the country, or do we have to post the recipe if we use one that's not from this site?
    threeovens
    Sat May 04, 2013 5:40 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Okay. Maybe I can help. Satyne thought it would be an exciting learning experience to travel the world through every country''s food. There are a number of bloggers that are currently doing this. She thought it would be a good idea to share her journey with any of us who want to tag along.

    There are absolutely no requirements. The goal is to make the national dish or another typical dish from each and every country. However, you may not be able to do this or even want to. So you can travel a little or a lot, it is all up to you.

    Satyne thought it would be nice to share either experiences or research about different countries along the way. All optional, but fun to read, I think.

    You can make any dish you like, either from this site or anywhere else. If you want to add it to the database, great. If you don't, no problem. You can make any dish of your choosing. The fun is the journey. Posting a link will help others who want to try what you did. If you want, I will add the recipe to the database, I am good like that.

    Now, take a deep breath. Relax. This journey will take years if you keep with it.
    threeovens
    Sat May 04, 2013 6:17 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I made Afghan Meat Filled Pasta (Mantou). I haven't reviewed it yet, because I haven't eaten it yet. I took it to work for dinner a little later this evening. I also want feedback from DH. I left the tomatoes chunky as well as the onions. Okay, I admit it. I cut the recipe down to 2 servings so it wasn't enough to put in my food processor! My immersion blender decided today was as good as any a day to die. I tasted all the components, so I know it is good. The recipe was a little hard to understand though. Also, I did not have wonton wrappers. Or at least ones that were not moldy. Who knew wonton wrappers got moldy? Anyway, I used spring roll wrappers instead. They were actually fun to work with. They are just a little too thin for steaming and some of the packets opened, as you can see in the photo.

    I am planning on making more Afgani food.

    Satyne
    Sun May 05, 2013 1:49 am
    Food.com Groupie
    threeovens wrote:
    Okay. Maybe I can help. Satyne thought it would be an exciting learning experience to travel the world through every country''s food. There are a number of bloggers that are currently doing this. She thought it would be a good idea to share her journey with any of us who want to tag along.

    There are absolutely no requirements. The goal is to make the national dish or another typical dish from each and every country. However, you may not be able to do this or even want to. So you can travel a little or a lot, it is all up to you.

    Satyne thought it would be nice to share either experiences or research about different countries along the way. All optional, but fun to read, I think.

    You can make any dish you like, either from this site or anywhere else. If you want to add it to the database, great. If you don't, no problem. You can make any dish of your choosing. The fun is the journey. Posting a link will help others who want to try what you did. If you want, I will add the recipe to the database, I am good like that.

    Now, take a deep breath. Relax. This journey will take years if you keep with it.


    Spot on, except that yeah, I do want to have the recipes added to the website, it doesn't matter who posts them, but the idea is to be able to add them all to the countries 'menu' and the journey's cookbook for easy reference.
    Satyne
    Sun May 05, 2013 1:50 am
    Food.com Groupie
    threeovens wrote:
    I made Afghan Meat Filled Pasta (Mantou). I haven't reviewed it yet, because I haven't eaten it yet. I took it to work for dinner a little later this evening. I also want feedback from DH. I left the tomatoes chunky as well as the onions. Okay, I admit it. I cut the recipe down to 2 servings so it wasn't enough to put in my food processor! My immersion blender decided today was as good as any a day to die. I tasted all the components, so I know it is good. The recipe was a little hard to understand though. Also, I did not have wonton wrappers. Or at least ones that were not moldy. Who knew wonton wrappers got moldy? Anyway, I used spring roll wrappers instead. They were actually fun to work with. They are just a little too thin for steaming and some of the packets opened, as you can see in the photo.

    I am planning on making more Afgani food.



    Stunning picture, first tag! good work.
    Satyne
    Sun May 05, 2013 3:20 am
    Food.com Groupie
    have set up a host account for the event to save everything to a cookbook and menus.
    Leggy Peggy
    Sun May 05, 2013 4:02 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Satyne wrote:
    Need more people awake at the same time as me hahaha, all lonesome over here in Aus.


    Hi there -- I'm awake, but then I'm in Australia.
    Have been super busy, and just today had a chance to look at recipes.
    I'll tag two for now, but will do plenty more.
    Hope to do at least one for each country.

    For Angola, I'll make Lemon Salad (Angola) #466885

    For Algeria, I'll make Algerian Salad #171689

    Hubby and I spent about two weeks in Angola in 2009, travelling overland
    from the north to the south. The truck had problems and we spent several
    nights in a northern village that had almost nothing in the way of fresh food.
    I'll see if I can find a pic of the 'market'.
    Satyne
    Sun May 05, 2013 6:22 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Leggy Peggy wrote:
    Satyne wrote:
    Need more people awake at the same time as me hahaha, all lonesome over here in Aus.


    Hi there -- I'm awake, but then I'm in Australia.
    Have been super busy, and just today had a chance to look at recipes.
    I'll tag two for now, but will do plenty more.
    Hope to do at least one for each country.

    For Angola, I'll make Lemon Salad (Angola) #466885

    For Algeria, I'll make Algerian Salad #171689

    Hubby and I spent about two weeks in Angola in 2009, travelling overland
    from the north to the south. The truck had problems and we spent several
    nights in a northern village that had almost nothing in the way of fresh food.
    I'll see if I can find a pic of the 'market'.


    Awesome, I'm in Australia too, in Brisbane. Looking forward to the pic if you can find it. I'll record your tags now. I've only picked out a few, but I think I need to find some more recipes for some of our countries.
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