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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Recipe Requests - General / recipe - pickled carrot julienne for serving salad
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    recipe - pickled carrot julienne for serving salad

    satimis
    Wed Apr 03, 2013 2:13 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Hi all,

    I have been making pickled carrot julienne with distilled white vinegar for serving salad for prolonged time. It is extremely easy just pouring distilled white vinegar on carrot julienne prepared on food process. It will be ready for serving salad in 3 days.

    I expect trying something different using apple cider vinegar instead of distilled white vinegar. Please advise where can I find a recipe? TIA

    B.R.
    satimis
    pinky kookie
    Wed Apr 03, 2013 2:41 pm
    Food.com Groupie

    Here are these similar recipes with apple cider vinegar that you can make adding and omitting the ingredients in the way you want it:

    MEXICAN STYLE HOT PICKLED CARROTS RECIPE -
    By dawnie2u - 20 reviews -
    http://www.food.com/recipe/mexican-style-hot-pickled-carrots-143736

    PICKLED CARROTS WITH MINT RECIPE -
    By under12parsecs - no reviews -
    http://www.food.com/recipe/pickled-carrots-with-mint-449106
    Zeldaz
    Wed Apr 03, 2013 4:18 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    As long as the vinegar has the same acidity level as the one you have been using, they would be interchangeable, so you could use the same recipe. Most distilled white vinegar and cider vinegar sold in the US has 5% acidity.

    I ferment shredded carrots with some dill in a 2% salt brine at room temperature for several days. It's great on salads, and the probiotics from the fermentation are an extra benefit. Fermented Carrots With Dill (Pikl-It)
    I also use this recipe for Escabeche, Mexican Pickled Carrots (Escabeche)
    satimis
    Wed Apr 03, 2013 11:40 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    pinky kookie wrote:

    Here are these similar recipes with apple cider vinegar that you can make adding and omitting the ingredients in the way you want it:

    MEXICAN STYLE HOT PICKLED CARROTS RECIPE -
    By dawnie2u - 20 reviews -
    http://www.food.com/recipe/mexican-style-hot-pickled-carrots-143736

    PICKLED CARROTS WITH MINT RECIPE -
    By under12parsecs - no reviews -
    http://www.food.com/recipe/pickled-carrots-with-mint-449106

    Hi,

    Thanks for your recipe

    satimis
    satimis
    Thu Apr 04, 2013 12:16 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Zeldaz wrote:
    As long as the vinegar has the same acidity level as the one you have been using, they would be interchangeable, so you could use the same recipe. Most distilled white vinegar and cider vinegar sold in the US has 5% acidity.

    Noted and thanks.

    Quote:

    I ferment shredded carrots with some dill in a 2% salt brine at room temperature for several days. It's great on salads, and the probiotics from the fermentation are an extra benefit. Fermented Carrots With Dill (Pikl-It)
    I also use this recipe for Escabeche, Mexican Pickled Carrots (Escabeche)

    I would like trying "Fermented Carrots with Dill". But I don't have Pikl-It. Neither it is available here. Air-tight jars are plenty here.

    I have been searching on Internet to find a solution how to create "anaerobic environment" on air-tight jars without result. I found following links;

    How To Turn A Mason Jar Into A Fermenting Crock
    http://www.nwedible.com/2012/07/how-to-turn-a-mason-jar-into-a-fermenting-crock.html

    Equally it is not a good idea to make a few of them. Besides I have to order the parts abroad.

    It there any solution? Thanks

    Edit:
    ===
    Re. I ferment shredded carrots with some dill in a 2% salt brine at room temperature for several days.

    1) Is it in a air-tight jar?
    2) 2% salt brine - 2% salt per weight of the ingredients?
    3) Is it necessary to rinse it with water afterwards?

    satimis
    Zeldaz
    Thu Apr 04, 2013 8:56 am
    Food.com Groupie
    satimis wrote:
    Zeldaz wrote:
    As long as the vinegar has the same acidity level as the one you have been using, they would be interchangeable, so you could use the same recipe. Most distilled white vinegar and cider vinegar sold in the US has 5% acidity.

    Noted and thanks.

    Quote:

    I ferment shredded carrots with some dill in a 2% salt brine at room temperature for several days. It's great on salads, and the probiotics from the fermentation are an extra benefit. Fermented Carrots With Dill (Pikl-It)
    I also use this recipe for Escabeche, Mexican Pickled Carrots (Escabeche)

    I would like trying "Fermented Carrots with Dill". But I don't have Pikl-It. Neither it is available here. Air-tight jars are plenty here.

    I have been searching on Internet to find a solution how to create "anaerobic environment" on air-tight jars without result. I found following links;

    How To Turn A Mason Jar Into A Fermenting Crock
    http://www.nwedible.com/2012/07/how-to-turn-a-mason-jar-into-a-fermenting-crock.html

    Equally it is not a good idea to make a few of them. Besides I have to order the parts abroad.

    It there any solution? Thanks

    Edit:
    ===
    Re. I ferment shredded carrots with some dill in a 2% salt brine at room temperature for several days.

    1) Is it in a air-tight jar?
    2) 2% salt brine - 2% salt per weight of the ingredients?
    3) Is it necessary to rinse it with water afterwards?

    satimis


    1. It has an air lock with water in it so gasses can escape. You could probably rig something inexpensively.
    2. Yes. 19g. of pickling salt in 4 cups (slightly less than 1 liter) of water.
    3. No need to rinse, the salt is not that strong.It's not as intense as sauerkraut.
    satimis
    Thu Apr 04, 2013 9:51 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Zeldaz wrote:
    - snip -

    1. It has an air lock with water in it so gasses can escape. You could probably rig something inexpensively.
    2. Yes. 19g. of pickling salt in 4 cups (slightly less than 1 liter) of water.
    3. No need to rinse, the salt is not that strong.It's not as intense as sauerkraut.

    Thanks for your further advice.

    I never used pickling salt before, having no idea of its availability here.

    Anyway I found following article'

    What Is Pickling Salt?
    http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-pickling-salt.htm

    I'll use kosher salt instead to be pulverized in the blender. Since I use weight measurement it won't make much difference.


    I also read following article:-

    Pickle Salt Substitute
    http://www.ehow.com/facts_7468775_pickle-salt-substitute.html

    Re. Substitue Warning
    When making pickles, it is essential not to substitute reduced-sodium salt. Sodium acts as the primary curing agent that enacts the pickling process. Low-sodium salts will not be effective in pickling.


    Regarding Pickl-it jar I'll try the option suggested on following article;
    Another Option for Fermentation
    http://www.picklemetoo.com/2012/05/10/another-option-for-fermentation/

    Because all ingredients are under the oil layer. The oil seals the top, bubbles can escape but no oxygen can get it, creating an anaerobic environment.

    I'm still interested to get Pickl-It jar if possible.

    Rgds
    satimis
    Zeldaz
    Thu Apr 04, 2013 10:40 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Any pure salt will do, as long as it has no additives, like anti-caking agents or iodine. Pickling salt is relatively fine so it dissolves faster. Crushing a coarser salt without additives should work just fine for you. Just check the label, as some kosher salt does have additives.
    satimis
    Fri Apr 05, 2013 5:17 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Zeldaz wrote:
    Any pure salt will do, as long as it has no additives, like anti-caking agents or iodine. Pickling salt is relatively fine so it dissolves faster. Crushing a coarser salt without additives should work just fine for you. Just check the label, as some kosher salt does have additives.

    Noted and thanks.

    I have some doubt in mind. For fermentation the bottle has to be kept in a dark corner at room temperature for several days. Would the pickled food be suitable for eating without further treatment? If applying heat for sterilization it would destroy the pickled food.

    satimis
    Zeldaz
    Fri Apr 05, 2013 9:33 am
    Food.com Groupie
    satimis wrote:
    Zeldaz wrote:
    Any pure salt will do, as long as it has no additives, like anti-caking agents or iodine. Pickling salt is relatively fine so it dissolves faster. Crushing a coarser salt without additives should work just fine for you. Just check the label, as some kosher salt does have additives.

    Noted and thanks.

    I have some doubt in mind. For fermentation the bottle has to be kept in a dark corner at room temperature for several days. Would the pickled food be suitable for eating without further treatment? If applying heat for sterilization it would destroy the pickled food.

    satimis


    The heat would not destrry the food itself, but it would destroy the bacteria, which are beneficial, like the bacteria found in yogurt. I pack the carrots into smaller jars (pints) and store them in the refrigerator. This is not a strongly acidic product, and would require the addition of more acid to make it safe to process in canning jars; if that is your goal, I would not recommend this method for that purpose.
    satimis
    Sat Apr 06, 2013 12:37 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Zeldaz wrote:
    - snip -

    The heat would not destrry the food itself, but it would destroy the bacteria, which are beneficial, like the bacteria found in yogurt. I pack the carrots into smaller jars (pints) and store them in the refrigerator. This is not a strongly acidic product, and would require the addition of more acid to make it safe to process in canning jars; if that is your goal, I would not recommend this method for that purpose.

    I accept the bacteria in daily yogurt, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus etc. They are probiotics.

    I'll keep the carrots in a glass jar refrigerated. I'll use them as salad dressing to be consumed in one week.

    Thanks

    satimis
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