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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Q & A / Question:Leftover Mashed Potato Soup
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    Question:Leftover Mashed Potato Soup

    polskakoza
    Sun Mar 31, 2013 5:47 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Leftover Mashed Potato Soup Kosher salt with bacon? icon_eek.gif
    Zeldaz
    Sun Mar 31, 2013 5:52 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Sure. Most chefs prefer kosher salt to cook with because of the size and shape of the flakes. If you substituted the same measure of fine table salt the dish would be much too salty. The other ingredients have nothing to do with the use of kosher salt.
    polskakoza
    Sun Mar 31, 2013 5:54 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Well, you always learn something new, cheers. icon_biggrin.gif
    DrGaellon
    Sun Mar 31, 2013 11:07 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    1 tsp of table salt weighs about 6.3 grams. 1 tsp of Morton's Kosher Salt weighs about 5 grams, 1 tsp of Diamond Kosher Salt weighs 3.75 grams.

    As a general rule, when using Morton's Kosher salt, multiply the volume of table salt by 1.2, or for Diamond, multiply by 1.7.

    Most cooks prefer kosher salt because the larger, spikier crystals are easier to grab with fingers and sprinkle; table salt is too fine and spills out of the fingers.
    polskakoza
    Mon Apr 01, 2013 8:24 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Thanks for the information. It makes things clear. Here in England we call large crystalled salt "see salt", I think because it comes from the see as opposed to mined salt (large crystals too), or full of additives, freely running table salt. icon_wink.gif
    DrGaellon
    Mon Apr 01, 2013 9:25 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Sea salt is something else yet again. Kosher salt is specifically SPIKY - for the original purpose of kashering meat, it's shaped to stick to the surface (like burrs stick to skin), which also helps it to be easily picked up by fingers. Sea salt varies in shape depending on where and how it's made, but is usually either big and flaky, like Maldon, or else cubic, like table salt but larger. Coarse sea salt won't dissolve in food as quickly because it has much less surface area as compared with kosher salt. Personally, I keep kosher salt next to the stove for cooking, and sea salt (either regular or grey) for finishing dishes and for adding at table.
    Chocolatl
    Mon Apr 01, 2013 12:26 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Technically all salt is sea salt, because it all originally came from the sea, even mined salt.

    Check the label on your sea salt and Kosher salt. You may find, as I did, that it's just as full of additives as table salt, without the benefit of providing iodide.
    DrGaellon
    Mon Apr 01, 2013 12:31 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Chocolatl wrote:
    Technically all salt is sea salt, because it all originally came from the sea, even mined salt.

    Check the label on your sea salt and Kosher salt. You may find, as I did, that it's just as full of additives as table salt, without the benefit of providing iodide.

    While accurate, that's a rather fussy technical point icon_smile.gif and "sea salt" usually means "salt which has been recently extracted from sea water" - but I'm sure you know that.

    Unless you have completely forsworn all seafood, you probably don't need to worry about using iodized salt. The amount of iodine you actually need is minuscule; your body is really really good at scavenging iodine, and does not need much replacement at all (unlike sodium, which is wasted in urine at hundreds of milligrams a day).
    Chocolatl
    Mon Apr 01, 2013 12:55 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    DrGaellon wrote:
    Chocolatl wrote:
    Technically all salt is sea salt, because it all originally came from the sea, even mined salt.

    Check the label on your sea salt and Kosher salt. You may find, as I did, that it's just as full of additives as table salt, without the benefit of providing iodide.

    While accurate, that's a rather fussy technical point icon_smile.gif and "sea salt" usually means "salt which has been recently extracted from sea water" - but I'm sure you know that.

    Unless you have completely forsworn all seafood, you probably don't need to worry about using iodized salt. The amount of iodine you actually need is minuscule; your body is really really good at scavenging iodine, and does not need much replacement at all (unlike sodium, which is wasted in urine at hundreds of milligrams a day).


    Actually, here in the midwest you really do need to use iodized salt. True, you don't need much of it, but it's not all that easy to get if you live far from the sea. Anyway, I'd rather not take the chance when iodized salt is such an easy answer.
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