Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Archives: Old Topic of the Month Threads / Flavor Of The Month - SAGE
    Lost? Site Map

    Flavor Of The Month - SAGE

    Go to page 1, 2  Next Page >>
    JoyfulCook
    Sun Mar 31, 2013 9:42 am
    Forum Host





    Once prized for its medicinal value, the most popular use of sage these days is in stuffing for the Thanksgiving turkey. Sage is much too good to bring out only for the holidays. Learn more about this respected herb and try some interesting old and new sage recipes

    Sage works especially well with fatty meats such as pork, sausage, goose, and lamb, because it aids in the digestion. Sage is also very good in stuffings, beans, potatoes, risotto, cheeses, and tomato sauces.

    VEGETABLES WITH SAGE



    Corn With Lime-Sage Butter
    Roasted Asparagus With Sage and Lemon Butter
    Roasted Potatoes With Sage and Garlic

    Misto Di Verdure Alla Salvia (Mixed Vegetables With Sage)
    Green Beans with Mushrooms and Sage
    Sage and Cheddar Potato Gratin
    Roasted Baby Carrots With Fennel and Sage

    Wash the sage and chop it as fine as possible. For an informal dinner, cut the sage with kitchen shears. In many cases it's better to add fresh sage at the end of the cooking process. The heat has a tendency to dissipate the flavor rather quickly. The nutrient levels in fresh sage are much higher than in dry sage, but they both have their place in cooking. Many people like the stronger taste of fresh sage.




    FANTASTIC FISH



    Herb Baked Fish
    Fish Fillet With Garlic Butter and Black Olives
    Baked Salmon Provencale

    Dried sage is preferred by most cooks and comes in whole leaf, rubbed, and ground form. Rubbed sage has a light, velvety texture, whereas ground sage is more of a free-flowing powder. As with all dried herbs, store closed containers in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Use within 6 months for best flavor.

    Fresh sage has a milder flavor than dried.

    1 Tablespoon fresh chopped sage = 1 teaspoon dried

    1/2 ounce fresh leaves = 1/2 cup leaves


    SAGE IN MEAT DISHES



    Sage and Pancetta Shrimp
    Sage-Roasted Turkey With Caramelized Onions
    Sage Meat Loaf




    Parmesan Sage Pork Chops
    Chicken with Apples and Sage
    Pork, Orange and Sage Meatloaf

    Do you have a favourite recipe using sage? do share your recipes and tips here with us please.


    Last edited by JoyfulCook on Tue Apr 30, 2013 8:26 am, edited 2 times in total
    chicken_feets
    Sun Apr 07, 2013 9:12 am
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Lately I've been seeing sage used a lot in cooking, especially to infuse oil or garnish a finished plate.

    While out shopping yesterday, I bought a plant called Pineapple Sage. It does have a pineapply after note, so I'm curious how it will compliment the dish I choose to use it with.

    That is if it continues to grow because my thumb isn't the greenest on the planet. icon_rolleyes.gif
    JoyfulCook
    Sun Apr 07, 2013 10:24 am
    Forum Host
    chicken_feets wrote:
    Lately I've been seeing sage used a lot in cooking, especially to infuse oil or garnish a finished plate.

    While out shopping yesterday, I bought a plant called Pineapple Sage. It does have a pineapply after note, so I'm curious how it will compliment the dish I choose to use it with.

    That is if it continues to grow because my thumb isn't the greenest on the planet. icon_rolleyes.gif


    I have not heard of a pineapple sage before - sounds great this is what I found on the web

    Pineapple sage (Salvia elegans) is an underrated herb in the garden. It doesn't need much attention, but has a lot to offer. It will grow up to five feet tall, and its bright leaves are a delicate shade of green all summer long. It produces slender, trumpet shaped red flowers that attract butterflies and hummingbirds, too.

    sounds like you made a great choice!
    chicken_feets
    Sun Apr 07, 2013 11:32 am
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Thank you, JoyfulCook. It is an attractive plant. Maybe when stepson tills the garden space, as a transplant it might get five feet tall! Currently, I planted it in a container of its own. Pics if it lives, lol.
    **Tinkerbell**
    Sun Apr 07, 2013 2:00 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Hi Joy! Hi Chicken_feets! wave.gif

    Thanks to both of you, I now have a plant to contribute to the garden. Great Gramma is teaching DD to grow things in the garden. With a dozen 15 foot long beds, there's plenty of room to give everyone an area. Great, except I keep telling GG that "my" area will be a big dead spot. It's a wonder I've successfully raised one kid and the second one is still thriving, cause if they were plants.... oh boy. Not a chance they'd survive my black thumb! icon_lol.gif

    However, the pineapple sage plant sounds like it might just hold up. And what a cute name! I like the sound of the blooms too. When we shop for seeds next weekend I'll look for the pineapple sage.
    Plus, I love sage! icon_smile.gif
    *Tink
    chicken_feets
    Mon Apr 08, 2013 3:36 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Oh my, Tinkerbell! That's a lot of room for planting. I've had decent luck with gardens in the summer, especially peppers. They love the heat and we have plenty of that. My real desire is a bumper crop of tomatoes. We will see.

    Best of luck to your planting and gardening!
    chicken_feets
    Mon Apr 08, 2013 4:03 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Here's a photo of the Pineapple Sage. After two days, it still lives. I'm keeping my fingers crossed for success this time. icon_smile.gif
    **Tinkerbell**
    Mon Apr 08, 2013 10:21 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    It's beautiful! I just used some sage tonight, as a matter of fact. Generally, I make my pasta sauces from scratch; however, tonight I ended up bringing an extra kid home from school and he's a very picky eater. Luckily, I usually keep a jar of sauce on hand for the occasional Dinner 911. But most of the flavors we've tried are too bland. Tonight I tossed in some sugar, oregano oil, basil oil and rubbed sage. Turned out pretty good. icon_smile.gif
    chicken_feets
    Tue Apr 09, 2013 7:24 am
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    I've always liked sage for savory preparations like chicken gravies. It lends an earthy flavor or something.
    JoyfulCook
    Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:27 am
    Forum Host
    Well both you Tinks and Chickens feet have been busy, it sounds a delightful addition to any garden. love the pictures too, btw Chickens I would pinch out the middle of all the shoots and it with thicken up, go down a couple of sets of leafs, its worth it !
    duonyte
    Tue Apr 09, 2013 3:23 pm
    Forum Host
    Regular garden sage is a very hardy plant - I've kept a plant going for years in a large tub, with other herbs. You really only need one, as it is a strongly-flavored herb, and you will never be using a great amount of it.

    I love pineapple sage - it's not as assertive, somewhat pineapply/floral in taste and fragrance. The plant, however, is not very hardy and generally does not survive our winters unless I bring it in, and then I forget to water it. So I usually buy a new one each year. This is for Zone 5.
    chicken_feets
    Tue Apr 09, 2013 7:56 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Hi JoyfulCook, I know to pinch the plant back for thickness. I figured to give it a bit of a transplant recovery period.

    Our winters aren't much here, but for an herb like that, or most of the others, I'd buy new ones.

    I'm trying something different because I haven't had luck with herbs in the past. It's the heat. So I've made their location mobile on a rolling cart. Before they were getting burned up in the full morning sun on the front porch.
    JoyfulCook
    Wed Apr 10, 2013 4:09 am
    Forum Host
    chicken_feets wrote:
    Hi JoyfulCook, I know to pinch the plant back for thickness. I figured to give it a bit of a transplant recovery period.

    Our winters aren't much here, but for an herb like that, or most of the others, I'd buy new ones.

    I'm trying something different because I haven't had luck with herbs in the past. It's the heat. So I've made their location mobile on a rolling cart. Before they were getting burned up in the full morning sun on the front porch.


    Yes, they always need a time to recover! I love the idea of being able to wheel it around, I must remember that for when we move.
    EddyGirl
    Thu Apr 11, 2013 8:09 am
    Food.com Staff
    duonyte wrote:
    Regular garden sage is a very hardy plant - I've kept a plant going for years in a large tub, with other herbs. You really only need one, as it is a strongly-flavored herb, and you will never be using a great amount of it.

    I love pineapple sage - it's not as assertive, somewhat pineapply/floral in taste and fragrance. The plant, however, is not very hardy and generally does not survive our winters unless I bring it in, and then I forget to water it. So I usually buy a new one each year. This is for Zone 5.


    Does sage need much sunlight? Do other herbs? I want to grow some on my balcony, but it doesn't get much sun.
    JoyfulCook
    Thu Apr 11, 2013 8:32 am
    Forum Host
    They do need some sun, give it a try thats the only way you will find out - it might be just great, they dont need sun all day!
    Go to page 1, 2  Next Page >> Stop sending e-mails when someone replies
    Add this to My Favorite Topics
    Alert us of inappropriate posts

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Ideas from Food.com

    Powered by phpBB 2.0.1 © 2002 phpBB Group

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites