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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / African Cooking / Rooibos tea and Honeybush Tea
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    Rooibos tea and Honeybush Tea

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    Zurie
    Sat May 07, 2005 1:00 am
    Forum Host
    Yes, the wild tea story is interesting. These "teas" occur only in South Africa, and only in a few places. The teas are not processed except for being hygienically cleaned and packed, i.e. does not go through any commercial process. So their medicinal properties are untouched.

    Honeybush Tea (probably hard to come by in the USA) is my favourite. It has a deeper flavour than Rooibos and a faint honey flavour. It only grows against the hills in one fairly small farming valley not far from where I live.

    One important thing to remember is that these wild teas are not treated like ordinary Ceylon or even green and jasmine teas. It should be made like them, with boiling water, but make it strong!! Then you must literally brew it on a stove.

    It's best to use a fireproof pot such as stainless steel, but it can stand rough handling and you can also use an ordinary small saucepan with a lid. Let it simmer ever so gently for a while -- 5 - 15 mins., it doesn't matter. Real bush tea should be a reddish brown to a dark red brown when ready.

    Drink it as you like, but the preferred manner is much like English tea -- with milk and sugar -- BUT the milk must be warmed! A mug of steaming, sweet, strong bush tea is a real comfort when you have a cold of flu, or just feel like a hot drink. It has a slew of wonderful properties including lots of anti-0xidants, and as far as I know no-one on earth is allergic to it. In fact, it's used by people with allergies. You might find you want more milk in it than normally, or you might want it without milk.

    A colicky baby? No matter how young -- cool down some rooibos, doesn't matter how much, and add to baby's bottle. You can sweeten it a little. Goodbye, colic!
    HappyBunny
    Sat May 07, 2005 4:56 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Thank you for this information. I just posted in the other post about Rooibos. I have just started drinking Rooibos Chai and that's all I ever drink now.
    Sackville
    Sat May 07, 2005 6:03 am
    Food.com Groupie
    HappyBunny wrote:
    Thank you for this information. I just posted in the other post about Rooibos. I have just started drinking Rooibos Chai and that's all I ever drink now.


    It's very popular at our work as well. I have yet to try it but there are two guys in the office who swear by it and I see it in most of the supermarkets now.
    Zurie
    Sat May 07, 2005 10:33 am
    Forum Host
    Happy Bunny and Sackville Girl, just make sure it says on the packet that the tea does come from South Africa.
    Zurie
    Sat May 07, 2005 10:37 am
    Forum Host
    icon_biggrin.gif I assume you did see the website addy posted in the sosatie thread? http://www.annique.com/rooibosstory/story1.html
    This is all about rooibos tea.
    I doubt, actually, if you'll find honeybush tea in the US.
    Sackville
    Sat May 07, 2005 2:16 pm
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    Chef Zee wrote:
    Happy Bunny and Sackville Girl, just make sure it says on the packet that the tea does come from South Africa.


    Where else might it come from? Is there a difference in taste?
    Akikobay
    Thu May 12, 2005 9:52 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Oh my...honeybush tea is my absolute favorite. I'm of Japanese ancestry and grew up with green teas, but the rooibos and the honeybush teas are even higher in antioxidants so primarily we drink these teas at home and have been for several years.

    I also feel no guilt giving them to my kids! We brew them a bit stronger, make iced tea and they drink it without any sweetening.

    Edited to add: You can get honeybush at most upper end health food or tea stores, but it's a recent thing. Usually I buy my Honeybush at a tea specialty store.
    Zurie
    Fri May 13, 2005 1:35 pm
    Forum Host
    Akikobay, where do you live? I admit I didn't even know that Honeybush tea was being exported! Very interesting, what you wrote.
    Akikobay
    Fri May 13, 2005 1:57 pm
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    I live in Virginia and we've been drinking both Rooibos and Honeybush teas for several (over 2) years. Honeybush arrived on the scene a bit after the bush teas. I admit that the honeybush is often out of stock, so when it's available we buy it by the pound. I've also seen it at gourmet stores.

    After we started to find these teas at specialty places, we also started looking online for sources. (...it's often unavailable online as well.) We really enjoy this tea, it doesn't have caffeine, but you can put sweetening and milk in it. (It also has more of a black tea flavor than other herbals like mate. I can't even swallow mate!)

    I wonder, I know that there are very few places where honeybush is grown, is it also a "seasonal" item where you have to wait for the next crop to be ready to sell?

    BTW...the instructions that came with the honeybush are to steep it in water that is just below boiling. Based upon your posts, this doesn't sound right, although we do brew it until it's almost a dark red-brown-orangish color. Is it supposed to be steeped in boiling water (or boiled) as well?
    Anntrenton
    Mon Oct 18, 2010 5:45 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I've really gotten into Rooibos tea. I started drinking it for its health benefits which are many. Rooibos has anti-carcinogenic and antimutagenic effects. Rooibos tea is used for its anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic properties. Consumption of rooibos tea may relief fever, asthma, insomnia, colic in infants and skin disorders. Rooibos extracts are used in ointments against eczema.
    Zurie
    Mon Oct 18, 2010 8:55 am
    Forum Host
    Anntrenton wrote:
    I've really gotten into Rooibos tea. I started drinking it for its health benefits which are many. Rooibos has anti-carcinogenic and antimutagenic effects. Rooibos tea is used for its anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic properties. Consumption of rooibos tea may relief fever, asthma, insomnia, colic in infants and skin disorders. Rooibos extracts are used in ointments against eczema.


    First of all: Anntrenton, (I guess you're called Ann? icon_biggrin.gif ) welcome to Food.com and the African Cooking Forum!wave.gif

    I hope you come back, and also check out our other forums! We're a helpful and friendly lot! icon_lol.gif

    I was surprised to see this 5 year old thread again!!

    I see I also never answered two queries in the old thread!!

    One: Honeybush is seasonal. I'm not sure exactly when they harvest it: probably in fall (will have to do some research). Honeybush -- as far as I know: the thread is 5 yrs old, and things change -- is still only a wild bush tea, not cultivated, totally organic, and only grows in 2 areas that I know of -- mountainous, bushy regions.

    Two: The instructions might well say the water should be below boiling, but both these teas benefit from "brewing" and a light simmering is fine.

    (My long-late gran had a special tin kettle for this, on the back of her black wood stove!)

    What Ann says is true. In South Africa at least 2 local skin care ranges contain Rooibos extracts.

    It's in many skin lotions and creams.

    And I repeat: rooibos tea (I suppose Honeybush as well) in a baby's bottle helps with pesky colic!
    Anntrenton
    Mon Oct 18, 2010 9:21 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I've really gotten into Rooibos tea. I started drinking it for its health benefits which are many. Rooibos has anti-carcinogenic and antimutagenic effects. Rooibos tea is used for its anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic properties. Consumption of rooibos tea may relief fever, asthma, insomnia, colic in infants and skin disorders. Rooibos extracts are used in ointments against eczema.
    duonyte
    Mon Oct 18, 2010 9:36 am
    Forum Host
    UmmBinat
    Mon Oct 18, 2010 12:43 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I have Organic Rooibos with Honeybush by Traditional Medicinals. I'd like to try it like this>>> Simple Herbal Iced Tea (Sugar-Free)
    Zurie
    Mon Oct 18, 2010 2:32 pm
    Forum Host
    duonyte wrote:
    I have rooibos tea, but have not tried honeybush and will have to get some. I was interested to see the flavored honeybush teas that my favorite tea source is selling.


    I had to delete the rest of your quote, duo, because it was a large paragraph of gobbledegook!!! No idea why! icon_eek.gif

    By all means, try the flavoured teas. But genuine Honeybush Tea IS so flavourful, that I would not want to have added flavours in there! In its pure form it is just a lovely herbal tea, but without any medicinal flavour.

    I have never had it cold -- not really a habit here. But a large cup or mug of strongly-brewed honeybush, with hot milk and sugar, is a wonderfully comforting drink! icon_wink.gif
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