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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Critter Cafe / Pet poisons...A to Z- check for updates
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    Pet poisons...A to Z- check for updates

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    Dib's
    Tue Mar 19, 2013 10:25 am
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    Saralaya
    Tue Mar 19, 2013 12:27 pm
    Forum Host
    Thanks Dib's.... great article....We will make it a sticky!
    Pot Scrubber
    Tue Mar 19, 2013 5:15 pm
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    Very nice list. Lots of stuff on there that I wasn't aware of.
    K9 Owned
    Tue Mar 19, 2013 7:43 pm
    Forum Host
    Great list. Thanks Di!
    Saralaya
    Mon Apr 22, 2013 12:20 pm
    Forum Host
    I just read a VERY sad posting on fb from a woman who lost her beloved dog to plant poisoning that she was previously unaware of.

    Heliotrope :





    and the leaves in particular



    This woman said that her dog would munch on a couple of leaves occasionally. He became VERY ill and as it turns out the toxins in this plant destroy the liver! There is NO antidote or cure.

    Cats are in as much danger as dogs, as are horses and other mammals.

    icon_eek.gif I've seen these pretty flowers in so many gardens.... I thought I'd pass this on! icon_sad.gif
    K9 Owned
    Mon Apr 22, 2013 2:11 pm
    Forum Host
    Thanks Saralaya!

    They are lovely flowers and without reading this I could easily have planted some.
    Saralaya
    Mon Apr 22, 2013 5:01 pm
    Forum Host
    K9 Owned wrote:
    Thanks Saralaya!

    They are lovely flowers and without reading this I could easily have planted some.


    The poor woman said she had no clue and had not encountered these on previous lists of dangerous plants. I see them in so many yards, because they ARE so pretty........I'm glad that she decided to share her experience.
    Saralaya
    Wed Apr 24, 2013 4:16 pm
    Forum Host
    OK... here's a HORRIBLE story.... about a dog who died after ingesting ONE (U.S.) penny...... here are the details...

    http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57581037/dog-fatally-poisoned-by-one-penny/

    Some dogs will eat just about anything, from chicken bones to plants to prescription pills.

    Common household items pose health danger to pets

    One poor pooch from Colo. lost her life after eating another item found commonly in households: a penny.

    That's because pennies minted after 1982 contain zinc, which is a toxic substance to pets such as dogs and cats, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association.

    "I used to call her my walking heart on four legs; just one of the nicest dogs," Maryann Goldstein , the owner of the deceased West Highland White terrier named Sierra, said to CBS Denver, which reported the case.

    Goldstein said Sierra was always attracted to change, and remembered her Westie swallowing 32 cents worth of a change as a puppy, requiring surgery.

    However this March, the dog got very sick and had to go to the veterinarian. An X-ray revealed a quarter and penny in her stomach. The penny presented the biggest risk because it contained zinc.

    Dr. Rebecca Jackson, a staff veterinarian at Petplan pet insurance, told CBSNews.com in an email that these newer pennies are so toxic because gastric acid from the pet's stomach can reach the zinc center of the penny quickly, causing it to be absorbed in the body rapidly.

    She said zinc interferes with red blood cell production, and the longer the exposure, the greater likelihood red blood cells will be destroyed. Symptoms of zinc toxicity include vomiting, diarrhea, lack of appetite, lethargy, red-colored urine or looking jaundiced.

    "I just couldn't believe it, and this time she wasn't so lucky," said Goldstein.

    Goldstein wears her dog's ashes in a heart-shaped container on a necklace, and shares Sierra's story to warn others that a penny could be so costly.

    In March, one lucky New York City Jack Russell terrier had a health scare when he ate 111 pennies and became ill.

    The dog, Jack, developed an upset stomach and began to vomit. When the owner brought Jack to the vet, doctors had to remove the pennies four to five coins at a time before all 111 were removed, BluePearl Veterinary Partners said at the time.

    Jack survived the ordeal.

    "Zinc toxicosis is more commonly seen in dogs, but cats can get sick from eating pennies, too," warned Jackson. "Be sure to bank your spare change before curious pets can get their paws on it -- and if they do, get them to the emergency vet immediately."

    © 2013 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    K9 Owned
    Wed Apr 24, 2013 4:33 pm
    Forum Host
    How awful!

    It had nothing to do with the health of pets but here in Canada pennies are no longer minted and most stores just round up or down.... most I have noticed have just increased the price a cent or two.
    Saralaya
    Wed Apr 24, 2013 4:39 pm
    Forum Host
    K9 Owned wrote:
    How awful!

    It had nothing to do with the health of pets but here in Canada pennies are no longer minted and most stores just round up or down.... most I have noticed have just increased the price a cent or two.


    K9- there are still plenty of Canadian pennies floating around though and I just Googled it and from 1997 to 1999 the pennies made were switched to copper coated zinc.... this affects cats too btw..... I am always trying to make sure that all our change is put AWAY...now I will redouble that effort! icon_eek.gif
    K9 Owned
    Wed Apr 24, 2013 4:43 pm
    Forum Host
    I mentioned the pennies being eliminates as an aside. I expect that there are many people like me with scads of coins that won't get recycled any time soon so of course they are still a hazard.

    My guys don't seem the least interested in metal objects but I/we do make sure that everything dangerous is out of reach. Of course the cats can get places dogs cannot. A great warning post.
    Saralaya
    Wed Apr 24, 2013 4:49 pm
    Forum Host
    K9 Owned wrote:
    I mentioned the pennies being eliminates as an aside. I expect that there are many people like me with scads of coins that won't get recycled any time soon so of course they are still a hazard.

    My guys don't seem the least interested in metal objects but I/we do make sure that everything dangerous is out of reach. Of course the cats can get places dogs cannot. A great warning post.


    I know that K9....sorry if that didn't come across.... I wish they would eliminate them in the US too...such a pain in the...wherever you wind up carrying them! rotfl.gif
    K9 Owned
    Wed Apr 24, 2013 5:10 pm
    Forum Host
    Back pockets can be painful icon_wink.gif
    Dib's
    Thu Sep 05, 2013 4:37 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Kinda makes you wonder about the DIY people who use pennies to make their floors. icon_eek.gif
    Pot Scrubber
    Thu Sep 05, 2013 7:15 pm
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    Dib's wrote:
    Kinda makes you wonder about the DIY people who use pennies to make their floors. icon_eek.gif

    I like that penny floor trick but my landlord would KILL me!

    But... covering the floor with pennies would TOTALLY give him a coronary.

    Anyway... back on topic... I used to give my dogs frozen grapes until I read this thread. They loved them and I hadn't been doing it for very long so no damage done. Now I give them frozen green beans or frozen baby carrots and they love either. For some odd reason they like them better frozen. Probably because they are crunchy. Dogs love crunchy stuff.
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