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    Strawberry Jam

    2eaglesgram
    Wed Jun 05, 2013 12:46 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    icon_sad.gif
    Help! I made strawberry jam and it didn't gel. Would it be possible for me to put the jam back in a saucepan and cook it longer. It looked like it was gel when I put on cold plate but after I put it in the jars and let it cool down it was more like strawberry syrup then jam.
    I'd appreciate if someone could give me a tip on what to do.
    Thanks
    Molly53
    Wed Jun 05, 2013 2:29 pm
    Forum Host
    2eaglesgram wrote:
    icon_sad.gif
    Help! I made strawberry jam and it didn't gel. Would it be possible for me to put the jam back in a saucepan and cook it longer. It looked like it was gel when I put on cold plate but after I put it in the jars and let it cool down it was more like strawberry syrup then jam.
    I'd appreciate if someone could give me a tip on what to do.
    Thanks
    Welcome to the forum, friend. It's very nice to meet you. icon_smile.gif

    Something that's not commonly mentioned is that it's best not to multiply the recipe or alter the ingredients as it can lead to a failure to jell AND that it can take up to a month for jams/jellies to set up into a spreadable consistency. The jelling point is 221F on a candy thermometer.

    If you don't want to wait, you can re-make the jam using this recipe: Liquid Cement (link)

    Whatever you do, don't discard it. If you decide not to re-make the jam, use it for syrup over pancakes/waffles, as a dessert sauce on cake/ice cream, as a glaze for chicken/pork or as a base for delicious BBQ sauce.
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