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    A Drizzle Of Oil

    JoyfulCook
    Sun Mar 10, 2013 8:47 am
    Forum Host



    Drizzling involves adding a thin stream of olive oil to various dishes for added flavor. Olive oil is usually drizzled from bottles designed to dispense oil called cruets. Cruets have narrow pour spouts that allow you to control the amount of olive oil you drizzle. You can drizzle olive oil over salads, breads, meats, seafood, pasta and vegetables.



    “It’s the finishing touch that dresses up a dish at the last minute. It usually consists of a teaspoon or two, and goes together with a sprinkling of some fresh chopped herbs, and possibly a squeeze of lemon or lime juice (or a wedge of one or the other placed on the plate).

    The aromas of olive oil are a critical part of its flavor. Pour a little bit of extra virgin olive oil into a small glass. Hold it, swirl it, warm it for a minute or two. Then put your nose in the glass and take in the aroma or “nose” of the olive oil. You may notice the smell of fresh-cut grass, cinnamon, tropical fruits or other aromas of ripe or green olive fruit.



    Oil and Vinegar Dressing
    Wild Purslane Salad With Olive Oil and Lemon Dressing
    Oil and Vinegar Salad Dressing

    A little olive oil is good for you and keeps you health specially if you have a few skin problems. not only by using it in your cooking but you can use olive oil on your skin as well.



    Beef or Chicken Fajita Marinade
    Chicken Souvlaki Marinade
    Spicy Barbecue Rub for Pork Ribs

    What do you use just a drizzle of oil on, I use it on tomatoes and chopped salad onions along with a few splashes of dark Balsamic vinegar and about half a teaspoon of dried oregano mixed in with the vinegar and oil, I leave it for a few hours for everything to work together
    Greek Style Tomato and Onion Salad

    Please give us the recipes you use that have that drizzle of oil and any tips that you have
    Zurie
    Sun Mar 10, 2013 10:50 am
    Forum Host
    A drizzle is great to use on fresh salad leaves.

    When preparing veggies to oven-roast, this method is probably the easiest:

    Put the oven-ready veggies in a mixing bowl or a plastic bowl. Season to taste. Then add olive oil, and toss the veggies in the oil while they're in the bowl. Then lift out with a slotted spoon to the roasting tin.

    This way each piece gets its covering of oil -- it works better than trying to drizzle over the oil when the vegetables are already in a roasting tin.
    JoyfulCook
    Mon Mar 11, 2013 4:01 am
    Forum Host
    Zurie wrote:
    A drizzle is great to use on fresh salad leaves.

    When preparing veggies to oven-roast, this method is probably the easiest:

    Put the oven-ready veggies in a mixing bowl or a plastic bowl. Season to taste. Then add olive oil, and toss the veggies in the oil while they're in the bowl. Then lift out with a slotted spoon to the roasting tin.

    This way each piece gets its covering of oil -- it works better than trying to drizzle over the oil when the vegetables are already in a roasting tin.


    Thanks Zurie, great tip. I must admit that I use the garlic olive oil like that quite a lot lol
    Chocolatl
    Mon Mar 11, 2013 1:44 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Even easier is to put them in a zip-top bag and shake it up.
    JoyfulCook
    Tue Mar 12, 2013 2:08 am
    Forum Host
    Chocolatl wrote:
    Even easier is to put them in a zip-top bag and shake it up.


    I do that when marinading but have not thought to do it with vegetables!
    Chocolatl
    Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:42 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    JoyfulCook wrote:
    Chocolatl wrote:
    Even easier is to put them in a zip-top bag and shake it up.


    I do that when marinading but have not thought to do it with vegetables!


    We always do this now when roasting vegetables. Much easier!
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