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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Q & A / Question:Perfect- Rump- Roast
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    Question:Perfect- Rump- Roast

    oldenuff
    Wed Feb 20, 2013 5:23 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Perfect Rump Roast How many minutes per pound for a rump roast to be medium well done? Thank you
    Dee514
    Wed Feb 20, 2013 5:31 pm
    Forum Host
    Meat Temperatures & Doneness Chart

    There are two schools of thought on roasting: cook the meat from start to finish at a consistent medium temperature, which reduces shrinking and sputtering and produces a juicy, evenly-cooked roast; or put it in a very hot oven to start, and then lower the temperature for the remainder of the cooking time, which helps brown the roast and its juices (contrary to a widely held belief, however, it does not sear the surface and thereby lock in its juices).

    In either case, you should let the roast warm up to room temperature for an hour or two. You may want to season it with salt and pepper and/or rub it with a garlic clove. Place it on a wire rack in a fairly shallow roasting pan (so it doesn’t steam in its own juices and so that the heat circulates freely), and pop it in the oven. If there is a layer of fat on the meat, keep that on top.

    Various cuts of meat take different amounts of time to cook.

    Cooking at a constant oven temperature of 300°F (160°C), a 5- to 8-lb standing rib roast will take 17-19 minutes per pound for rare, 20-22 for medium rare, 23-25 minutes for medium, and 27-30 minutes for well done. A sirloin roast of 8- to 12-lbs will take 16-20 minutes for rare, 20-22 for medium rare, 23-25 for medium, and 26-30 for well done. A boneless top round, by contrast, will take 28-30 minutes for rare, 30-33 for medium rare, 34-38 for medium, and 40-45 for well done.

    If you roast at 325°F (160°C), subtract 2 minutes or so per pound. If the roast is refrigerated just before going into the oven, add 2 or 3 minutes per pound. We won’t even attempt to suggest times for the initial-hot-oven cooking method.

    After the roast comes out of the oven, let it rest for 15 to 20 minutes, which allows the juices to become more evenly distributed within the meat and makes it easier to carve. The temperature of the roast will rise 5° to 10° after you take it from the oven, so if you are using a thermometer, you should take it out a bit before it reaches the desired temperature.
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