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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Q & A / Grits
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    Grits

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    Maximi
    Mon Feb 18, 2013 12:05 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    My husband loves grits and wants to know how to and what to use to make his own. I told him I thought grits are made from ground corn but I don't know much aboout them. I hope someone can help. Thank you, Maxine
    Zeldaz
    Mon Feb 18, 2013 12:27 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Grits are made from hominy, which is corn that's been nixtamalized in order to release its nutrients. Nixtamalization involve soaking the corn in an alkaline solution like limewater or lye, and hulling the kernals. This makes hominy. Grits are not cornmeal, which is made from corn that has not been processed in that way. If you want to make your own hominy, here's a description http://southernfood.about.com/gi/o.htm?zi=1/XJ&zTi=1&sdn=southernfood&cdn=food&tm=14&gps=314_184_1009_550&f=21&su=p284.9.336.ip_p830.4.336.ip_&tt=2&bt=1&bts=1&zu=http%3A//www.mtnlaurel.com/Recipes/hominy.htm.
    DrGaellon
    Mon Feb 18, 2013 4:01 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Zeldaz wrote:
    Grits are not cornmeal, which is made from corn that has not been processed in that way.

    I do believe, however, that the only difference between grits and polenta is the fineness of the grind?
    Zeldaz
    Mon Feb 18, 2013 5:20 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    No the basic difference is hominy vs. not hominy. Grits and cornmeal/polents are all available in coarse, medium, and fine grinds.
    MaineNative
    Tue Feb 19, 2013 8:29 am
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    Zeldaz, I think you're right. Also, the grits I buy are white, whereas cornmeal is yellow.
    Zeldaz
    Tue Feb 19, 2013 9:19 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Hominy (aka posole) is available in both yellow and white, but I think the preferred color in the South is white, but both colors are used in the Southwest.
    MaineNative
    Wed Feb 20, 2013 6:56 am
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    Zeldaz, what a fountain of information you are. You're a treasure!
    Zeldaz
    Wed Feb 20, 2013 8:36 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Kind words coming from a Maniac! icon_lol.gif
    Papa Deuce
    Thu Feb 21, 2013 4:23 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Zeldaz wrote:
    Hominy (aka posole) is available in both yellow and white, but I think the preferred color in the South is white, but both colors are used in the Southwest.


    Wait, posole is the stew you make from hominy, I believe..... Now I need to go check my facts, or yours. icon_smile.gif

    EDIT:

    Pozole (Nahuatl: pozolli [po'solːi]), which means "foamy"; variant spellings: pozolé, pozolli,or more commonly in the U.S. - posole)[1][2] is a traditional pre-Columbian soup or stew from Mexico, which once had ritual significance. Pozole was mentioned in Fray Bernardino de Sahagún's "General History of the Things of New Spain" circa 1500 CE. It is made from nixtamalized cacahuazintle corn,[1] with meat, usually pork, chicken, turkey, pork rinds, chili peppers, and other seasonings and garnis
    Papa Deuce
    Thu Feb 21, 2013 4:26 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    BTW, while not as good, there are boxed versions of grits available in many grocery stores.
    Zeldaz
    Thu Feb 21, 2013 7:03 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Papa Deuce wrote:
    Zeldaz wrote:
    Hominy (aka posole) is available in both yellow and white, but I think the preferred color in the South is white, but both colors are used in the Southwest.


    Wait, posole is the stew you make from hominy, I believe..... Now I need to go check my facts, or yours. icon_smile.gif

    EDIT:

    Pozole (Nahuatl: pozolli [po'solːi]), which means "foamy"; variant spellings: pozolé, pozolli,or more commonly in the U.S. - posole)[1][2] is a traditional pre-Columbian soup or stew from Mexico, which once had ritual significance. Pozole was mentioned in Fray Bernardino de Sahagún's "General History of the Things of New Spain" circa 1500 CE. It is made from nixtamalized cacahuazintle corn,[1] with meat, usually pork, chicken, turkey, pork rinds, chili peppers, and other seasonings and garnis


    Both the hominy and the soup are called posole. Check the shelves in an Hispanic market, or see this photo. http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.hotchile.com/shop/posole.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.hotchile.com/cgi-bin/shop.pl/page%3Dposcorn.html&h=207&w=216&sz=19&tbnid=u9dk9SrxS-m_OM:&tbnh=90&tbnw=94&zoom=1&usg=__--vUOrv82acCMbCX0lXSNkCva3I=&docid=-nt_C3iRwLQ8VM&sa=X&ei=j7YmUYylEYi1rQHsk4HgDg&ved=0CDUQ9QEwAQ&dur=3641
    ala-kat
    Thu Feb 21, 2013 8:33 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    DrGaellon wrote:
    Zeldaz wrote:
    Grits are not cornmeal, which is made from corn that has not been processed in that way.

    I do believe, however, that the only difference between grits and polenta is the fineness of the grind?


    Polenta is just a hi-falutin' name for cold grits icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif
    DEEP
    Thu Feb 21, 2013 8:59 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    ala-kat wrote:
    DrGaellon wrote:
    Zeldaz wrote:
    Grits are not cornmeal, which is made from corn that has not been processed in that way.

    I do believe, however, that the only difference between grits and polenta is the fineness of the grind?


    Polenta is just a hi-falutin' name for cold grits icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif


    Well, not exactly. But, we southerners sure like to look at things rather simplistically, eh?
    ala-kat
    Thu Feb 21, 2013 9:25 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    DEEP wrote:
    ala-kat wrote:
    DrGaellon wrote:
    Zeldaz wrote:
    Grits are not cornmeal, which is made from corn that has not been processed in that way.

    I do believe, however, that the only difference between grits and polenta is the fineness of the grind?


    Polenta is just a hi-falutin' name for cold grits icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif


    Well, not exactly. But, we southerners sure like to look at things rather simplistically, eh?


    Got me there...not the plain ole white grits, but the yellow stone-ground grits - cooked and now cold = polenta, at least in my book icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif
    DEEP
    Thu Feb 21, 2013 9:30 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    YELLOW, stone ground greets? Why, perish the thought, my dear!
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