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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Q & A / Grits
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    Grits

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    DrGaellon
    Thu Feb 21, 2013 10:35 pm
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    ala-kat wrote:
    Got me there...not the plain ole white grits, but the yellow stone-ground grits - cooked and now cold = polenta, at least in my book icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif

    Not to an Italian. I've been served polenta both hot and cold, both soft and firm.
    Dee514
    Thu Feb 21, 2013 10:48 pm
    Forum Host
    ala-kat wrote:
    Got me there...not the plain ole white grits, but the yellow stone-ground grits - cooked and now cold = polenta, at least in my book icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif

    NO WAY! The only similarity between grits and (white or yellow) polenta is that they are made from corn. The similarity ends there.!
    Papa Deuce
    Fri Feb 22, 2013 6:23 am
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    Zeldaz wrote:
    Papa Deuce wrote:
    Zeldaz wrote:
    Hominy (aka posole) is available in both yellow and white, but I think the preferred color in the South is white, but both colors are used in the Southwest.


    Wait, posole is the stew you make from hominy, I believe..... Now I need to go check my facts, or yours. icon_smile.gif

    EDIT:

    Pozole (Nahuatl: pozolli [po'solːi]), which means "foamy"; variant spellings: pozolé, pozolli,or more commonly in the U.S. - posole)[1][2] is a traditional pre-Columbian soup or stew from Mexico, which once had ritual significance. Pozole was mentioned in Fray Bernardino de Sahagún's "General History of the Things of New Spain" circa 1500 CE. It is made from nixtamalized cacahuazintle corn,[1] with meat, usually pork, chicken, turkey, pork rinds, chili peppers, and other seasonings and garnis


    Both the hominy and the soup are called posole. Check the shelves in an Hispanic market, or see this photo. http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.hotchile.com/shop/posole.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.hotchile.com/cgi-bin/shop.pl/page%3Dposcorn.html&h=207&w=216&sz=19&tbnid=u9dk9SrxS-m_OM:&tbnh=90&tbnw=94&zoom=1&usg=__--vUOrv82acCMbCX0lXSNkCva3I=&docid=-nt_C3iRwLQ8VM&sa=X&ei=j7YmUYylEYi1rQHsk4HgDg&ved=0CDUQ9QEwAQ&dur=3641


    Well, I have 6 cans of hominy in my basement, and none say posole on them.
    Zeldaz
    Fri Feb 22, 2013 9:51 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I have several in my pantry, they all say posole on them. I live in New Mexico. The term is used for both the hominy and for the stew.

    Dee514
    Sun Feb 24, 2013 1:38 am
    Forum Host
    Is it possible that pozole = hominy, and posole = stew? Or doesn't the spelling make a difference? icon_confused.gif
    Zeldaz
    Sun Feb 24, 2013 9:02 am
    Food.com Groupie
    No, it's the same thing. The z is often used in Mexico, the s is usually used in the U.S. There are some other variations on the spelling, too.

    Other examples of an ingredient having the same name as the product: chile refers to the chile pod, but it also refers to the product made with those pods, as in red chile and green chile; gumbo refers both to okra and a dish made with the okra.

    Dee514
    Sun Feb 24, 2013 9:33 am
    Forum Host
    Thanks Z....I learned something new today icon_smile.gif
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