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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Canning, Preserving and Dehydrating / From Poblano to Ancho
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    From Poblano to Ancho

    nolan_vode
    Thu Feb 07, 2013 6:42 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I'd like to know when a poblano pepper is at a suitable stage to convert into an ancho,

    From what I can gather, even tho anchos have that deep red raisin-like color, they are generally made from green poblanos, not red.

    If you dry a poblano it in a dehydrator, will it come out the same as drying it slowly and naturally, or is there a increase in sweetness (and color change) that only occur during the slow method?
    Zeldaz
    Thu Feb 07, 2013 8:04 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    You need to wait for the poblanos to ripen. Anchos are ripe poblanos which are dried. If it's green it may be mature, but it isn't ripe or sweet yet. It will turn a sort of chocolate color before it turns red, and they can be picked at that stage and left in a cool, dry place to finish turning red. Then you can dry them. We have dried them whole in a dehydrator, but it does take quite awhile and didn't really dry them any faster, but we live in the desert and almost anything dries in the air here. We've had good luck making them into primitive ristras and hanging them in our garage to dry. Put some newspaper or cardboard under them, in case of dripping juice.
    Debbwl
    Thu Feb 07, 2013 8:14 pm
    Forum Host
    Hi Nolan_vode,

    The poblano is a mild chili pepper originating in the state of Puebla, Mexico. Dried, it is called a chile ancho ("wide chile"). The ripened red poblano is significantly hotter and more flavorful than the less ripe, green poblano. While poblanos tend to have a mild flavor, occasionally and unpredictably, they can have significant heat. Different peppers from the same plant have been reported to vary substantially in heat intensity. A closely related variety is the mulato, which is darker in color, sweeter in flavor and softer in texture.

    Dried poblano peppers are called ancho chiles. The peppers wrinkle and become black, resembling a raisin. Ancho means "broad" in Spanish, referring to the pepper's width when it flattens during drying. Drying ancho chiles is a method of preservation and flavor concentration.

    Drying does concentrate the flavor!

    As for dehydrator over slow and natural have not compared the two as the peppers I have enjoyed have been naturally dried.

    Hope this has been some help. Deb


    Last edited by Debbwl on Thu Feb 07, 2013 8:16 pm, edited 1 time in total
    JanuaryBride
    Thu Feb 07, 2013 8:15 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I found this info online:

    Harvesting Poblano Peppers
    Poblano peppers look very much like a small wrinkled, bell pepper.
    Leave poblanos on the vine a little longer, if you want them to turn red. For eating poblanos, you can harvest them green or red – it is a matter of personal taste. For drying, fully ripe peppers are best.
    JanuaryBride
    Thu Feb 07, 2013 8:20 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I found this too...this person tells you their experience with dehydrating poblanos and they used green ones (not red)

    http://dehydratingwaybeyondjerky.blogspot.com/2012/09/processing-poblano-peppers.html
    Zeldaz
    Thu Feb 07, 2013 9:18 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Note those are dried green poblanos, not red, ripe anchos. Unripe poblanos will not ripen in the dehydrator, and most certainly not if they are cut up, which stops all maturation.
    Timothy J Higgins Eva
    Fri Feb 08, 2013 10:20 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Poblano peppers are also called Ancho peppers and originate from Mexico. The longer you leave the pepper on the plant the darker red it will turn until it's like a fire truck red. They are a little larger in size and have very little zip, comparable to a green pepper.Don't get me wrong there are hot types but most are mild and great on the grill!
    Leave poblanos on the vine a little longer, if you want them to turn red. For eating poblanos, you can harvest them green or red – it is a matter of personal taste. For drying, fully ripe peppers are best.They will not change color after they are dried.
    nolan_vode
    Fri Feb 08, 2013 7:26 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Thanks for all your responses.

    Before coming here I discovered a lot of info browsing for Poblanos and Anchos, but there always seemed to be key details left out from different expert sources which left questions and sometimes caused them to sound contradictory.

    It didn't make sense to me that Anchos come from green Poblanos, but that was the explanation I got at more than a few sites.

    Then I discovered this place and figured what better place to seek answers

    Sadly for me, It seems to be a moot point now that I have been surprised to find there is no availability of any larger sized fresh chiles in my Southern California locale aside from green Poblanos (which the grocers here mistakenly call Pasillas), Anaheim peppers, and of course bell peppers of every color.

    No large red peppers of any kind whatsoever. I could have sworn seeing them here in the past, but no more.

    But I am still curious about one thing (just in case I stumble upon a red Poblano one of these days).

    Some people say the Ancho is not just a dried Poblano, but "smoked" as well.

    Can anyone speak to that?

    BTW, I did run across that article at http://dehydratingwaybeyondjerky.blogspot.com/2012/09/processing-poblano-peppers.html
    in my search. I roast different peppers all the time but it never dawned on me to dehydrate them afterwards, but why not? I usually freeze my unused roasted peppers, but I'm gonna definitely try dehydrating as well.

    thanks
    Debbwl
    Fri Feb 08, 2013 7:59 pm
    Forum Host
    Here is an artical you might find helpful http://www.pepperseeds.eu/pepersbewaren/
    Zeldaz
    Fri Feb 08, 2013 10:10 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    "Some people say the Ancho is not just a dried Poblano, but "smoked" as well."

    They are confusing chipotles with anchos. Anchos often taste somewhat smoky when dried. Chipotles are red, ripe jalapenos which have been smoked. They are available dried and in cans with adobo sauce. Once certain chiles re ripe and dried, they usually have a different name. Ancho chiles, are, once again, ripe red poblanos which have been dried. Smoking is a separate issue.
    Molly53
    Fri Feb 08, 2013 10:11 pm
    Forum Host
    Since you're in southern California, I wonder if you might not consider growing your own peppers, friend. I believe you have the ideal climate for them.

    Alternatively, have you considered shopping at the Mexican markets? They'll frequently have items mainstream groceries won't have.
    Zeldaz
    Sat Feb 09, 2013 8:45 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    nolan_vode wrote:




    ...green Poblanos (which the grocers here mistakenly call Pasillas),
    No large red peppers of any kind whatsoever. I could have sworn seeing them here in the past, but no more.

    You are so right about the mis-labeling in markets.
    "Pasilla ... refers to more than one variety of chili pepper in the species Capsicum annuum. A true pasilla is the dried form of the long and narrow chilaca pepper. However, in the United States producers and grocers often incorrectly use pasilla to describe the poblano, a different, wider variety of pepper whose dried form is called an ancho."
    Do you have a Pro's Ranch Market near you? Or an equivalent market that caters to Mexican-American customers? Pro's here has just about everything, but here's the thing:

    WHY are you looking for FRESH chiles in February? Look for them in season. Anything you do find now is not going to be in prime shape. Like the wizened poblanos in my fridge right now that we just HAD to have! icon_lol.gif Chiles rellenos in my future this coming week!
    nolan_vode
    Wed Feb 13, 2013 5:44 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Molly53 wrote:
    Since you're in southern California, I wonder if you might not consider growing your own peppers, friend. I believe you have the ideal climate for them.

    Wish I had the environment.

    Molly53 wrote:
    Alternatively, have you considered shopping at the Mexican markets? They'll frequently have items mainstream groceries won't have.

    Zeldaz wrote:
    Do you have a Pro's Ranch Market near you? Or an equivalent market that caters to Mexican-American customers?

    The Vallarta, Jons and Northgate chains, but none of them have it.

    I actually spoke to a produce specialist at the huge "Grand Central Market" in downtown Los Angeles, who explained that there is not sufficient demand to stock the red variety on any consistent basis. They get them only occasionally .

    Zeldaz wrote:
    WHY are you looking for FRESH chiles in February? Look for them in season. Anything you do find now is not going to be in prime shape

    I'm sure you know much more about seasonal trends than me. All I can say is the Poblanos here as recently as a couple weeks ago when I shopped them looked fresh (full of moisture), crisp and dark glossy green; as nice as you would want to see them.
    Zeldaz
    Wed Feb 13, 2013 7:00 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    You're lucky, I'm down near the border and all the chiles in winter are shrivelly from storage. And I live where they grow the darn things! Good luck in your quest.
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