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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Middle East & North Africa / FEBRUARY'S SUN and SPICE EVENT
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    FEBRUARY'S SUN and SPICE EVENT

    Go to page << Previous Page  1, 2, 3 ... 53, 54, 55 ... 96, 97, 98  Next Page >>
    Rita~
    Mon Feb 11, 2013 9:04 pm
    Forum Host
    Annacia wrote:
    We are current to here and it's almost time for Sweet Genius icon_biggrin.gif .....so:


    Love the heart on the belly! Perfect for Valentine's day
    Debbwl
    Mon Feb 11, 2013 9:06 pm
    Forum Host
    Starrynews wrote:
    Have made and enjoyed Jalapeno and Cheddar Cornbread #39165 by Sue Lau (Veggie forum)



    Oh man that looks yummy!!
    Starrynews
    Mon Feb 11, 2013 9:08 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Debbwl wrote:
    Starrynews wrote:
    Have made and enjoyed Jalapeno and Cheddar Cornbread #39165 by Sue Lau (Veggie forum)



    Oh man that looks yummy!!


    It was great; definitely recommended icon_smile.gif
    Debbwl
    Mon Feb 11, 2013 9:08 pm
    Forum Host
    Rita~ wrote:
    UmmBinat wrote:
    Rita~ wrote:
    UmmBinat wrote:
    Annacia wrote:
    UmmBinat wrote:
    Has anyone here ever tried maca?


    I've heard of it but don't really know what it is.


    Same but I read good things about it for fertility and the preparation for getting a baby lol.

    R U trying a child?


    I think so.
    From what I see of your eating habits your baby will be just perfect. Healthy strong and beautiful. I wish you good health and an easy pregnancy and labor.




    Big Congrats!!!!
    UmmBinat
    Mon Feb 11, 2013 9:34 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Annacia wrote:
    UmmBinat wrote:
    Rita~ wrote:
    UmmBinat wrote:
    Annacia wrote:
    UmmBinat wrote:
    Has anyone here ever tried maca?


    I've heard of it but don't really know what it is.


    Same but I read good things about it for fertility and the preparation for getting a baby lol.

    R U trying a child?


    I think so.


    Are congratulations in order yet?


    Not yet. icon_smile.gif
    UmmBinat
    Mon Feb 11, 2013 9:38 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Rita~ wrote:
    UmmBinat wrote:
    Rita~ wrote:
    UmmBinat wrote:
    Annacia wrote:
    UmmBinat wrote:
    Has anyone here ever tried maca?


    I've heard of it but don't really know what it is.


    Same but I read good things about it for fertility and the preparation for getting a baby lol.

    R U trying a child?


    I think so.
    From what I see of your eating habits your baby will be just perfect. Healthy strong and beautiful. I wish you good health and an easy pregnancy and labor.


    Thank you Rita. My last birth was perfect for the location ~ hospital.
    pammyowl
    Mon Feb 11, 2013 9:43 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I had my daughter in a hospital, I see nothing wrong with that, but I did get blood poisoning immediately afterwards. A connection? Hmm, not sure icon_lol.gif
    loof
    Mon Feb 11, 2013 9:54 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Enjoyed a delightful vegetarian meal this evening yummy.gif

    North African Bulgar Stuffed Baby Eggplant #491177 by Annacia (NA/ME)
    Burmese Cucumber Salad #282552 by Sharon123 (Vegetarian)


    North African Bulgar Stuffed Baby Eggplant




    Burmese Cucumber Salad
    Acadia*
    Tue Feb 12, 2013 12:36 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I made and reviewed Sahlab by LibraChick93093 (NA*ME Forun)

    Sorry no photo icon_rolleyes.gif I took one however I have no idea what I did with my card reader. If it is in our RV that is out of reach currently as it is getting serviced.
    Annacia
    Tue Feb 12, 2013 7:48 am
    Forum Host
    Hi All and Good Morning wave.gif

    Look at the over night activity, cool icon_biggrin.gif. I'll go get us updated then make some coffee and be back

    See you soon
    Annacia
    Tue Feb 12, 2013 7:56 am
    Forum Host
    Starrynews wrote:
    Have made and enjoyed Jalapeno and Cheddar Cornbread #39165 by Sue Lau (Veggie forum)



    Yum! I'd love some of this with a bowl of chili icon_biggrin.gif
    Annacia
    Tue Feb 12, 2013 8:03 am
    Forum Host
    loof wrote:
    Enjoyed a delightful vegetarian meal this evening yummy.gif

    North African Bulgar Stuffed Baby Eggplant #491177 by Annacia (NA/ME)
    Burmese Cucumber Salad #282552 by Sharon123 (Vegetarian)


    North African Bulgar Stuffed Baby Eggplant




    Burmese Cucumber Salad


    Loof, looks like a marvelous dinner hon. The completions are logged and a great big Thank You for trying the stuffed eggplant I'm happy that it was a hit for you. icon_biggrin.gif
    Annacia
    Tue Feb 12, 2013 8:05 am
    Forum Host
    Acadia* wrote:
    I made and reviewed Sahlab by LibraChick93093 (NA*ME Forun)

    Sorry no photo icon_rolleyes.gif I took one however I have no idea what I did with my card reader. If it is in our RV that is out of reach currently as it is getting serviced.


    Morning Cadie wave.gif

    Got this one. How is your MIL doing ?



    Treasure found here


    Last edited by Annacia on Wed Feb 13, 2013 10:32 am, edited 2 times in total
    Annacia
    Tue Feb 12, 2013 8:52 am
    Forum Host
    Lets do a bit of yogurt discovery while I sip my coffee.

    Yogurt History

    How milk was first cultured into yogurt remains a mystery. Analysis of the L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus genome indicates that the bacteria may have originated on the surface of a plant. Milk may have become spontaneously and unintentionally infected through contact with plants, or bacteria may have been transferred via the udder of domestic milk-producing animals.

    There is evidence of cultured milk products in cultures as far back as 2000 BCE. In the records of the ancient culture of India and Iran, yogurt is mentioned by 500 BCE. In ancient Indian records the combination of yogurt and honey is called "the food of the gods". Persian traditions hold that "Abraham owed his fecundity and longevity to the regular ingestion of yogurt".

    The oldest writings mentioning yogurt are attributed to Pliny the Elder, who remarked that certain "barbarous nations" knew how "to thicken the milk into a substance with an agreeable acidity". The use of yogurt by medieval Turks is recorded in the books Diwan Lughat al-Turk by Mahmud Kashgari and Kutadgu Bilig by Yusuf Has Hajib written in the 11th century. Both texts mention the word "yogurt" in different sections and describe its use by nomadic Turks. The earliest yogurts were probably spontaneously fermented by wild bacteria in goat skin bags.

    Another early account of a European encounter with yogurt occurs in French clinical history: Francis I suffered from a severe diarrhea which no French doctor could cure. His ally Suleiman the Magnificent sent a doctor, who allegedly cured the patient with yogurt. Being grateful, the French king spread around the information about the food which had cured him.


    Turkish cacık

    Until the 1900s, yogurt was a staple in diets of people in the Russian Empire (and especially Central Asia and the Caucasus), Western Asia, South Eastern Europe/Balkans, Central Europe, and India. Stamen Grigorov (1878–1945), a Bulgarian student of medicine in Geneva, first examined the microflora of the Bulgarian yogurt. In 1905, he described it as consisting of a spherical and a rod-like lactic acid bacteria. In 1907, the rod-like bacterium was called Bacillus bulgaricus (now Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus). The Russian Nobel laureate biologist Ilya Ilyich Mechnikov (also seen as Élie Metchnikoff), from the Institut Pasteur in Paris, was influenced by Grigorov's work and hypothesized that regular consumption of yogurt was responsible for the unusually long lifespans of Bulgarian peasants. Believing Lactobacillus to be essential for good health, Mechnikov worked to popularize yogurt as a foodstuff throughout Europe.

    Isaac Carasso industrialized the production of yogurt. In 1919, Carasso, who was from Ottoman Salonika, started a small yogurt business in Barcelona, Spain, and named the business Danone ("little Daniel") after his son. The brand later expanded to the United States under an Americanized version of the name: Dannon.


    Tarator is a cold soup made of yogurt, cucumber, dill, garlic and sunflower oil (walnuts are sometimes added) and is popular in Bulgaria.

    Yogurt with added fruit jam was patented in 1933 by the Radlická Mlékárna dairy in Prague.

    Yogurt was first introduced to the United States in the first decade of the twentieth century, influenced by Élie Metchnikoff's The Prolongation of Life; Optimistic Studies (1908); it was available in tablet form for those with digestive intolerance and for home culturing. It was popularized by John Harvey Kellogg at the Battle Creek Sanitarium, where it was used both orally and in enemas, and later by Armenian immigrants Sarkis and Rose Colombosian, who started "Colombo and Sons Creamery" in Andover, Massachusetts in 1929. Colombo Yogurt was originally delivered around New England in a horse-drawn wagon inscribed with the Armenian word "madzoon" which was later changed to "yogurt", the Turkish name of the product, as Turkish was the lingua franca between immigrants of the various Near Eastern ethnicities who were the main consumers at that time. Yogurt's popularity in the United States was enhanced in the 1950s and 1960s, when it was presented as a health food. By the late 20th century, yogurt had become a common American food item and Colombo Yogurt was sold in 1993 to General Mills, which discontinued the brand in 2010.


    Nutritional Value and Health Benefits

    Yogurt is nutritionally rich in protein, calcium, riboflavin, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12. It has nutritional benefits beyond those of milk. Lactose-intolerant individuals can sometimes tolerate yogurt better than other dairy products, because the lactose in the milk is converted to glucose and galactose, and partially fermented to lactic acid, by the bacterial culture.

    Yogurt containing live cultures has been found effective in a randomized trial at preventing antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Yogurt contains varying amounts of fat. There is non-fat (0% fat), low-fat (usually 2% fat) and plain or whole milk yogurt (4% fat). A study published in the International Journal of Obesity (11 January 2005) also found that the consumption of low-fat yogurt can promote weight loss.

    Varieties and Presentation

    Da-hi is a yogurt of the Indian subcontinent, known for its characteristic taste and consistency. The word da-hi seems to be derived from the Sanskrit word dadhi, one of the five elixirs, or panchamrita, often used in Hindu ritual. Dahi also holds cultural symbolism in many homes in the Mithilanchal region of Bihar. It is found in different flavours, two of which are very widely known: sour yogurt (tauk doi) and sweet yogurt (meesti or podi doi). In India and Pakistan, it is often used in cosmetics mixed with turmeric and honey. Sour yogurt,खट्टा दही, (not "खट्टी दही", since in Hindi the word for yogurt has a masculine grammatical gender) is also used as a hair conditioner by women in many parts of India and Pakistan. Dahi is also known as Mosaru (Kannada), Thayir (Tamil), Thayiru (Malayalam), doi (Assamese, Bengali), dohi (Oriya), perugu (Telugu), or Qәzana a pәәner (Pashto).

    Srikhand, a popular dessert in India, is made from drained yogurt, saffron, cardamom, nutmeg and sugar and sometimes fruits such as mango or pineapple.


    Srikhand

    Dadiah or Dadih is a traditional West Sumatran yogurt made from water buffalo milk, fermented in bamboo tubes.

    Yogurt is popular in Nepal, where it is served as both an appetizer and dessert. Locally called dahi (दही), it is a part of the Nepali culture, used in local festivals, marriage ceremonies, parties, religious occasions, family gatherings, and so on. The most famous type of Nepalese yogurt is called juju dhau, originating from the city of Bhaktapur. In Tibet, yak milk (technically dri milk, as the word yak refers to the male animal) is made into yogurt (and butter and cheese) and consumed.

    In Northern Iran, Mâst Chekide is a variety of kefir yogurt with a distinct sour taste. It is usually mixed with a pesto-like water and fresh herb purée called delal. Yogurt is a side dish to all Iranian meals. The most popular appetizers are spinach or eggplant borani, Mâst-o-Khiâr with cucumber, spring onions and herbs, and Mâst-Musir with wild shallots. In the summertime, yogurt and ice cubes are mixed together with cucumbers, raisins, salt, pepper and onions and topped with some croutons made of Persian traditional bread and served as a cold soup. Ashe-Mâst is a warm yogurt soup with fresh herbs, spinach and lentils. Even the leftover water extracted when straining yogurt is cooked to make a sour cream sauce called kashk, which is usually used as a topping on soups and stews.


    Recipe for kashk

    Matsoni is a Georgian yogurt popular in the Caucasus and Russia. It is used in a wide variety of Georgian dishes and is believed to have contributed to the high life expectancy and longevity in the country. Dannon used this theory in their 1978 TV advertisement called In Soviet Georgia where shots of elderly Georgian farmers were interspersed with an off-camera announcer intoning, "In Soviet Georgia, where they eat a lot of yogurt, a lot of people live past 100."[37] Matsoni is also popular in Japan under the name Caspian Sea Yogurt (カスピ海ヨーグルト).

    Tarator and Cacık are popular cold soups made from yogurt, popular during summertime in Albania, Azerbaijan (known as Dogramac), Bulgaria, Republic of Macedonia, Serbia and Turkey. They are made with ayran, cucumbers, dill, salt, olive oil, and optionally garlic and ground walnuts. Tzatziki in Greece and milk salad in Bulgaria are thick yogurt-based salads similar to tarator.

    Khyar w Laban (cucumber and yogurt salad) is a popular dish in Lebanon and Syria. Also, a wide variety of local Lebanese and Syrian dishes are cooked with yogurt like "Kibbi bi Laban", etc.

    Rahmjoghurt, a creamy yogurt with much higher fat content (10%) than many yogurts offered in English-speaking countries (Rahm is German for "cream"), is available in Germany and other countries.

    Dovga, a yoghurt soup cooked with a variety of herbs and rice is popular in Azerbaijan, often served warm in winter or refreshingly cold in summer.

    Cream-top yogurt is yogurt made with unhomogenized milk. A layer of cream rises to the top, forming a rich yogurt cream. Cream-top yogurt was first made commercially popular in the United States by Brown Cow of Newfield, New York, bucking the trend toward low- and non-fat yogurts.

    Jameed is yogurt which is salted and dried to preserve it. It is popular in Jordan.


    Jameed

    Zabadi is the type of yogurt made in Egypt, usually from the milk of the Egyptian water buffalo. It is particularly associated with Ramadan fasting, as it is thought to prevent thirst during all-day fasting.[38]

    Raita is a yogurt-based South Asian/Indian condiment, used as a side dish. The yogurt is seasoned with cilantro (coriander), cumin, mint, cayenne pepper, and other herbs and spices. Vegetables such as cucumber and onions are mixed in, and the mixture is served chilled. Raita has a cooling effect on the palate which makes it a good foil for spicy Indian and Pakistani dishes.

    Dahi is a Sindhi-curd, popular in India and Pakistan. People drink dahi along with food at intervals, to help digestion and make food more delicious. In some places, dahi is also served with plain rice
    UmmBinat
    Tue Feb 12, 2013 9:18 am
    Food.com Groupie
    pammyowl wrote:
    I had my daughter in a hospital, I see nothing wrong with that, but I did get blood poisoning immediately afterwards. A connection? Hmm, not sure icon_lol.gif


    They are just very pushy with the drugs to both mother and baby here.
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