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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Canning, Preserving and Dehydrating / Reccomendation on a good pressure canner.
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    Reccomendation on a good pressure canner.

    Chef #2663112
    Mon Jan 28, 2013 1:17 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I want to start canning my own spaghetti sauce, and I need some advice and a recommendation on a new pressure canner. Can you help me out?
    Molly53
    Mon Jan 28, 2013 2:05 pm
    Forum Host
    Chef 2663112 wrote:
    I want to start canning my own spaghetti sauce, and I need some advice and a recommendation on a new pressure canner. Can you help me out?
    All-American is generally considered the cadillac of home pressure canners, but they're a little pricey. Mirro and Presto also make pretty nice ones. When you make your purchase, make sure you get a pressure CANNER, not a pressure cooker. Click on PRESSURE CANNER V. PRESSURE COOKER for more information.

    A caveat if you have a smooth-top stove...not all of them can withstand the rigors of pressure canning (All-American does NOT recommend using their product on those stoves). It's an expensive appliance and it would be a shame to cause damage. It's best to contact your stove's mfgr for accurate advice. Click on CANNING ON A SMOOTHTOP STOVE for more information.

    If it turns out that your stove cannot handle pressure canning, some other people have had good luck with a commercial hotplate:


    Welcome to the forum. It's very nice to meet a new friend. icon_smile.gif
    Chef #2663112
    Mon Jan 28, 2013 2:13 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Thanks Molly53:
    This is exactly the advice and recordation I was looking for.
    Your point about the smooth top stove is great because I have one.
    I will have to called the manufacturer to see if it can handle pressure canning.
    Otherwise I will need to purchase the commercial hot plate.
    Krislady
    Tue Jan 29, 2013 6:30 am
    Forum Host
    I've been using an All-American canner for several years now, and have been very happy with it. I think it cost a couple of hundred dollars on Amazon, which I've more than recovered in home-canned food (mostly tomatoes and chicken stock!).

    The main reason I bought the All-American, though, was that it looked the most like the only other one I was familiar with - my mother's. icon_smile.gif
    lotusland
    Wed Jan 30, 2013 10:54 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I have used the side burner on my Barbeque for canning out on my deck. Worked fine! Lotus
    Krislady
    Thu Jan 31, 2013 6:21 am
    Forum Host
    Lotus - so have I! I had too many pots of tomatoes blanching and puree cooking, and we ran out of burners for the canner!
    Chef #2663112
    Fri Feb 01, 2013 12:48 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Still trying to buy the right pressure canner, and i have another question.
    The All-Ammerican 15 quart canner holds 7 quart jars but the inside hight is only 7.5 inches. Standard canning jars are 6.9". I remeber reding that the top of the jars need to be covered with 2" of water, Is that true?
    Do i need to be concerend about the inside hieght of the canner? I am only going to use quart jars.
    Molly53
    Fri Feb 01, 2013 1:54 pm
    Forum Host
    [quote="Chef #2663112"]Still trying to buy the right pressure canner, and i have another question.
    The All-Ammerican 15 quart canner holds 7 quart jars but the inside hight is only 7.5 inches. Standard canning jars are 6.9". I remeber reding that the top of the jars need to be covered with 2" of water, Is that true?
    Do i need to be concerend about the inside hieght of the canner? I am only going to use quart jars.[/quote]No, you only need a coupla inches of water in a pressure canner.

    The 2" you're referring to are for a boiling water bath canner (for processing pickles, fruits and jellies)

    Click on this and see if you don't find it helpful: http://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/uga/using_press_canners.html
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