Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Suggestions & Comments / Fair Reviews
    Lost? Site Map

    Fair Reviews

    roncraven
    Sun Jan 06, 2013 4:32 pm
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    I use to read the recipe reviews in hopes of picking up a couple of hints or clues to make things work better. Now, since I retired and have more time, I read them, whether I save the recipe or not, just as a source of entertainment. They're far better than any reality TV, and much funnier than most sitcoms. A lot of times, I can't help but feel sorry for the chef who created the dish and went to the trouble to share it with us, only to have it criticized by cooks who shot themselves in the foot. I think it would help if people read their own reviews before rating a dish.
    One of my favorite expressions is, "I followed the recipe to a tee, but I did make a couple of alterations."
    Other good ones are, "I didn't use (this or that) because my boyfriend is allergic to it." "I omitted the onions because my children don't like them." "My family doesn't like food too spicy, so I left off the chili powder." " I didn't have any hoisin sauce, so I used Worshtershire, instead." "I was out of baking powder, so I used baking soda." You get the idea.
    These comments are usually followed by, "I counted off two stars because it tasted flat-----bland----lacked something----was disappointing----didn't meet the usual quality I expect from this chef."
    Folks, we all make substitutions. We all tweak things to our personal tastes. That's fine. This very forum has reassured me that it's expected to some degree. But we're the ones changing things, not the original chef. If it doesn't work, it's not their fault. If we don't start to use some logic in the ratings, these nice people are going to quit giving us their recipes, and that would "just plum suck!" And why rave about how good something was, then give the recipe only four stars. Are you ticked off because you had to wash the dishes, or to get that fifth star, does the chef need to come to your house and cook it, themselves?
    I'm not saying that you should use the peanut oil and watch your boyfriend blow up like a puffer fish, or make your kids eat the damned onions. I'm just saying give credit where it's due and let the blame, or doubt, fall on whoever's head it belongs. I know it's disappointing when things don't work out. I want to blame someone else, too. But let's be realistic about this. Let's be fair!! Thank you.
    Chocolatl
    Mon Jan 07, 2013 3:13 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    This forum is primarily for suggestions about the site, not for the other members--most people don't look here at all. I don't think the staff is going to microedit reviews, nor would we want them to!

    I do agree with you, at least in part. Some people never give five stars on their initial rating of a dish, no matter how good it is, which makes no sense to me. Sometimes they'll take off stars because they only make part of a recipe--cake but not frosting, for example. Why punish the posting chef for that, especially if the cake was good?

    The worst are those who give low star ratings without trying the recipe. They don't approve of an ingredient, or they don't think the recipe is authentic, or whatever. That's what starless comments are supposed to be for.

    All that said, people aren't going to change. And I have to say that whenever I've had a real recipe failure, I've followed the recipe exactly. icon_eek.gif
    mums the word
    Thu Jan 10, 2013 2:58 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Agreed! The nastiest reviews usually come from those who have never posted a recipe themselves!

    I don't mind when people make changes as it may help others who need to make a similar change, but you shouldn't complain about the recipe if you have made such a change.
    Sue Lau
    Fri Jan 11, 2013 12:33 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    This might sound strange, but-

    I'd rather get a nasty review from someone who made the recipe and it didn't work out for than a glowing 5-star review from someone who was afraid to tell me the recipe didn't work out for them, in fear they might hurt my feelings or tick me off.
    I think complaining about your reviews does give people pause to rate them as they want, or else they just don't bother to review.
    Don't think so? Go look in the reviews and see! Most of them are 5 star, or one star (from those who don't care what you think about what they say), and there are a number of 4 star reviews (that's not really so bad, is it?), BUT the number for 3 and 2 star reviews drops of sharply. What's the likelihood of that in reality?
    We all have different tastes and abilities, and a range of reviews spread across the board should reflect that (and not just be top heavy with 5 star reviews).
    Just remember, a review of your recipe is not a review of you as a person. It's just a recipe.
    j/s
    Chocolatl
    Fri Jan 11, 2013 1:21 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Sue Lau wrote:
    This might sound strange, but-

    I'd rather get a nasty review from someone who made the recipe and it didn't work out for than a glowing 5-star review from someone who was afraid to tell me the recipe didn't work out for them, in fear they might hurt my feelings or tick me off.
    I think complaining about your reviews does give people pause to rate them as they want, or else they just don't bother to review.
    Don't think so? Go look in the reviews and see! Most of them are 5 star, or one star (from those who don't care what you think about what they say), and there are a number of 4 star reviews (that's not really so bad, is it?), BUT the number for 3 and 2 star reviews drops of sharply. What's the likelihood of that in reality?
    We all have different tastes and abilities, and a range of reviews spread across the board should reflect that (and not just be top heavy with 5 star reviews).
    Just remember, a review of your recipe is not a review of you as a person. It's just a recipe.
    j/s


    You are SO right.
    Anyway, to me the point of a review is to tell other prospective cooks things about the recipe.
    1Steve
    Fri Jan 18, 2013 5:02 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    My pet peeve is when a recipe has an abundance of 5 and 4 star reviews and some newbie with just a number for an ID, comes along and gives it 1 star, with no review. The 1 star stands and brings the recipes rating down without any comment from the person that did it as to what was wrong with it. I don't care if a recipe didn't work for you, or you didn't like the taste, so you gave it 1 star or no stars. That's helpful. But without a review to back it up? I sometimes wonder if someone doesn't open a second account just to leave fly by 1 star reviews to bolster their own similar recipe or just to do mischief. I don't see the point of stars without comments.
    DrGaellon
    Sat Jan 19, 2013 4:20 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Sue Lau wrote:
    Don't think so? Go look in the reviews and see! Most of them are 5 star, or one star (from those who don't care what you think about what they say), and there are a number of 4 star reviews (that's not really so bad, is it?), BUT the number for 3 and 2 star reviews drops of sharply. What's the likelihood of that in reality?

    I think of the stars the way I do grades - A B C D F, and I curve accordingly. 3 stars is average, and about 20% of my reviews are 3 stars. (I tend not to review recipes which I would only give 1 or 2 stars - in this environment, which is all volunteer, I work from the principle of "if you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all.")
    Chocolatl
    Fri Jan 25, 2013 4:21 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    You can give a 1 or 2 star review and still be nice. It's also important to let prospective cooks know if a recipe is going to work for them or not.
    davianng
    Sat Jul 13, 2013 5:01 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I came to this forum specifically to find other's opinions on this subject. As Ron said initially, WHY do people think they should give MY recipe a poor review when they totally changed it, or changed or omitted a key ingredient? What they have made is not what I posted. I have no problem getting a poor review if the recipe was followed as written and the person actually likes all the ingredients called for. But to hear "I hate green peppers, so used celery instead" in a recipe for Beef and Peppers or "We don't eat chicken, so I used turkey instead, and it was horrible! " in a recipe for Chicken Tarragon is just unfair.
    Thanks for letting me vent!
    Now to find where I can post about how I feel about people who post recipes verbatim from magazines and other cooking sites without trying them!
    Stop sending e-mails when someone replies
    Add this to My Favorite Topics
    Alert us of inappropriate posts

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Ideas from Food.com

    Powered by phpBB 2.0.1 © 2002 phpBB Group

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites