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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Q & A / Question:Oatmeal- Raisin- Cookies
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    Question:Oatmeal- Raisin- Cookies

    moregloryb
    Thu Jan 03, 2013 6:43 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Oatmeal Raisin Cookies
    some cookie recipes use "1 egg", or "2 egg", "3 egg". What difference will there be with the cookies, if use different amount of eggs? more dense? or thicker?
    icon_question.gif
    DrGaellon
    Thu Jan 03, 2013 7:36 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Eggs add puff, so more eggs will give you a puffier, cakier cookie.
    Dee514
    Thu Jan 03, 2013 10:34 pm
    Forum Host
    The number of eggs in a cookie recipe is directly related to the ratio of other ingredients in that recipe.

    You should not arbitrarily increase the number of eggs in a cookie recipe....in other words, if a cookie recipe is written for 1 egg, only use 1 egg....don't increase the number of eggs to 2 or 3 because you think it will make a better cookie. Usually you just end up with a cookie dough that is too wet and will not hold its shape.

    You will get the best results from a cookie recipe if you follow it as written.
    icon_smile.gif
    DrGaellon
    Fri Jan 04, 2013 7:06 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Dee514 wrote:
    The number of eggs in a cookie recipe is directly related to the ratio of other ingredients in that recipe.

    Yes, I was unclear. I should have said, "more eggs will give you a cakier, puffier cookie if all the other ingredients are kept the same" - and even then, as Dee points out, it may not work, as there may be too much liquid. If you are looking for a caky oatmeal cookie, you should search for one built to be caky. Otherwise, you may be doing lots of kitchen experiments until you tweak someone else's recipe to your liking.

    If you can locate it, Alton Brown's Good Eats episode "Three Chips for Sister Martha" goes through how changing ratios in a cookie changes the outcome - from the same basic recipe, he makes a thin and crispy, a puffy and caky, and a chewy chocolate chip cookie.
    Chocolatl
    Fri Jan 04, 2013 3:39 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    DrGaellon wrote:
    Dee514 wrote:
    The number of eggs in a cookie recipe is directly related to the ratio of other ingredients in that recipe.

    Yes, I was unclear. I should have said, "more eggs will give you a cakier, puffier cookie if all the other ingredients are kept the same" - and even then, as Dee points out, it may not work, as there may be too much liquid. If you are looking for a caky oatmeal cookie, you should search for one built to be caky. Otherwise, you may be doing lots of kitchen experiments until you tweak someone else's recipe to your liking.

    If you can locate it, Alton Brown's Good Eats episode "Three Chips for Sister Martha" goes through how changing ratios in a cookie changes the outcome - from the same basic recipe, he makes a thin and crispy, a puffy and caky, and a chewy chocolate chip cookie.


    Shirley Corriher's Chocolate Chip Cookies, Puffy Version
    Shirley Corriher's Chocolate Chip Cookies, Medium Version
    Thin and Crispy Chocolate Chip Cookies
    DrGaellon
    Fri Jan 04, 2013 7:21 pm
    Food.com Groupie

    Yes, but if one watches the episode (or reads the transcript, available at http://goodeatsfanpage.com), one can actually learn the science behind the variations.
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