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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Q & A / Japanese Chilis, Arbol Chilies
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    Japanese Chilis, Arbol Chilies

    trick
    Fri Dec 28, 2012 1:20 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I went to a party and was served a salsa. It only had various chili peppers in it...how would I prepare it to make it at my home. Didn't know the cooks so I'm stumped....Hope someone can help me make this sauce. It looked like tabasco when served. So it doesn't have any vegetables, etc. in it. Any ideas?
    Zeldaz
    Fri Dec 28, 2012 1:23 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    What color was it? Texture? Types of flavors? Different chiles have different flavors. What was served with it? Why do you reference Japan and chile arbol?
    Chocolatl
    Fri Dec 28, 2012 2:12 pm
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    How spicy was it? Japan and Arbol chilies are both very hot.
    trick
    Fri Dec 28, 2012 6:33 pm
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    The "salsa" was served at a Mexican party. It was deep red, smooth, and spicy. A nice spicy....not a hot, hot, hot spicy. One of the guests said that it was the Japanese Chilis and Arbol chilies toasted and ground into a paste. Then perhaps a liquid (water?) was added. The hostess served it with french fries - (fabulous) along with other foods, i.e. Mexican menu. I especially want to make it to serve with french fries...yummy!!!
    Zeldaz
    Fri Dec 28, 2012 6:56 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    If they are dried chiles they are first dry-toasted in a skillet, then re-hydrated before pureeing. There was probably some dry-roasted garlic in there, possibly some cumin, and some Mexican oregano, as well.
    Here's Rick Bayless' recipe for salsa made with arbol chiles. Despite the tomatillos, it does turn out red.

    Arbol Chile Salsa
    Salsa de Chile de Arbol

    Makes about 1 3/4 cup

    Ingredients

    1/2 ounce (about 16) chile de arbol
    6 large garlic cloves, unpeeled
    1 pound (10 to 12 medium) tomatillos, husked and rinsed
    Salt
    Sugar, about 1/2 teaspoon (optional)
    Directions

    1. Toast and roast. In an ungreased skillet set over medium heat, toast the chiles, stirring them around for a minute or so until they are very aromatic (some will have slightly darkened spots on them). Cover with hot tap water and let rehydrate for 30 minutes.

    In the same skillet, roast the garlic, turning regularly, until soft and blotchy-dark in places, about 15 minutes. Cool and slip off the papery skin.

    Roast the tomatillos on a baking sheet 4 inches below a very hot broiler until darkly roasted, even blackened in spots, about 5 minutes. Flip them over and roast the other side - 4 or 5 minutes more will give you splotchy-black and blistered tomatillos. Cool, then transfer the contents of the baking sheet (including any juices) to a blender or food processor.

    2. Finish the salsa. Drain the chiles and add them to the tomatillos along with the garlic. Puree, then scrape into a serving dish. Stir in enough water to give the salsa a spoonable consistency, usually about 1/4 cup. Season with salt, usually a scant teaspoon, and the sugar. Refrigerated, the salsa keeps for several days.
    trick
    Fri Dec 28, 2012 10:43 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Sounds interesting..I'm going to try this recipe tomorrow and I'll post the results. Thanks for taking the time to help me...it's sincerely appreciated!
    Rinshinomori
    Sat Dec 29, 2012 2:42 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Japanese chiles are called shishitou and looks like this:



    Found in Japanese markets and can be grown easily in the US. The heat is very minimal mostly, but 1 out of 10 is hot.
    Chocolatl
    Sat Dec 29, 2012 2:57 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Rinshinomori wrote:
    Japanese chiles are called shishitou and looks like this:



    Found in Japanese markets and can be grown easily in the US. The heat is very minimal mostly, but 1 out of 10 is hot.


    I think in this case "Japanese" refers to japonesa chiles, which are on the hot side.
    Rinshinomori
    Sat Dec 29, 2012 3:53 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Chocolatl wrote:
    Rinshinomori wrote:
    Japanese chiles are called shishitou and looks like this:



    Found in Japanese markets and can be grown easily in the US. The heat is very minimal mostly, but 1 out of 10 is hot.


    I think in this case "Japanese" refers to japonesa chiles, which are on the hot side.


    Not sure I understand Choco. Elaborate please. These can be quite hot sometimes.
    Chocolatl
    Sat Dec 29, 2012 4:13 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Rinshinomori wrote:
    Chocolatl wrote:
    Rinshinomori wrote:
    Japanese chiles are called shishitou and looks like this:



    Found in Japanese markets and can be grown easily in the US. The heat is very minimal mostly, but 1 out of 10 is hot.


    I think in this case "Japanese" refers to japonesa chiles, which are on the hot side.


    Not sure I understand Choco. Elaborate please. These can be quite hot sometimes.


    I believe the OP was referring to this kind of chile, which is usually sold dried, and is similar to arbol, but hotter:
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