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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Q & A / Seeking- information- about:- flour
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    Seeking- information- about:- flour

    LBuettner
    Mon Dec 24, 2012 1:15 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    can one substitute something to make "bread flour"?
    Zurie
    Mon Dec 24, 2012 6:08 am
    Forum Host
    Do you mean: you need bread flour but don't have it?

    I don't know where you are (I'm in South Africa) but I believe the flour called "all-purpose" in the USA should be a perfect substitute.

    I think bread flour contains more gluten than white (cake) flour, but even cake flour can be used.
    duonyte
    Mon Dec 24, 2012 9:52 am
    Forum Host
    To make bread flour, add 1 to 2 tsp vital wheat gluten for every cup of all-purpose flour used instead of the bread flour. Vital wheat gluten can be found in the baking section of most groceries. It will last a very long time if you keep it in the fridge in a sealed container.

    If you don't want to do this, go ahead and use the all-purpose flour - I assume you are making some kind of bread. The bread will not rise quite as high, and will be more tender, but it will be perfectly delicious. Hold back a bit of the liquid when making the dough - bread flour requires a bit more liquid, so if you are using all-purpose flour, you won't need quite as much.
    DrGaellon
    Tue Dec 25, 2012 8:37 am
    Food.com Groupie
    duonyte wrote:
    To make bread flour, add 1 to 2 tsp vital wheat gluten for every cup of all-purpose flour used instead of the bread flour. Vital wheat gluten can be found in the baking section of most groceries. It will last a very long time if you keep it in the fridge in a sealed container.

    If you don't want to do this, go ahead and use the all-purpose flour - I assume you are making some kind of bread. The bread will not rise quite as high, and will be more tender, but it will be perfectly delicious. Hold back a bit of the liquid when making the dough - bread flour requires a bit more liquid, so if you are using all-purpose flour, you won't need quite as much.

    Cook's Illustrated tested this, and found the vital wheat gluten didn't actually work. One solution is to use a retarded rise - pop the bread dough in the refrigerator over night. The gluten will develop to the maximum it can (all-purpose flour simply has less protein than bread flour, so it will never get QUITE as much gluten development).
    duonyte
    Tue Dec 25, 2012 10:32 am
    Forum Host
    Published May 1, 2011. From Cook's Illustrated.

    What is vital wheat gluten? Is it necessary when baking homemade bread?

    Vital wheat gluten (also known simply as “gluten”) is the protein component of wheat flour. To isolate the gluten, manufacturers combine flour with water to make dough and knead it to develop the gluten network. The dough is subsequently rinsed in water until all of the starch is removed and only the rubbery gluten remains, which is then dried and ground before packaging.

    Professional bakers add vital wheat gluten to strengthen dough so it retains more gas, which results in greater volume and a lighter crumb. Extra gluten is beneficial in “gluten-challenged” dough containing lower gluten flours (like whole wheat or rye) or sharp or bulky components (nuts, seeds, or bran) that can sever gluten strands. It can also enhance the chewiness of breads like bagels.

    When we tried the product in a hearty whole-wheat bread, adding 1½ teaspoons per cup of whole-wheat flour according to the manufacturer’s guidelines, we found that it rose 1/2 inch higher than the bread made without it. Added to a bagel recipe, it generated a crisp exterior and chewy interior, despite the fact that we used ordinary all-purpose flour instead of the specialized high-gluten flour the recipe called for.

    Our conclusion: If you want to lighten up a dense loaf or ensure chewiness in breads like bagels without having to resort to special mail-order flour, vital wheat gluten (available in supermarkets) is worth trying.
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