Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Archives: Old Topic of the Month Threads / What's On Your Menu for Christmas Eve and Christmas Day??
    Lost? Site Map

    What's On Your Menu for Christmas Eve and Christmas Day??

    JoyfulCook
    Sun Dec 23, 2012 2:24 pm
    Forum Host
    In Australia its already in the early hours of Christmas Eve and here in Darwin its Hot and so very humid so tonights menu will probably be decided at the last moment - something easy to put together and to eat as well.

    Christmas day is going to be outside with loads of salads, potato salad, rice salad, tossed salads with Fillet Mignon cooked on the barbeque, Cold Ham, Massive prawns cold and hot and spicy washed down with lots of long refreshing drinks.

    So whats on your menu?
    duonyte
    Sun Dec 23, 2012 3:47 pm
    Forum Host
    Traditionally for Christmas Eve we are supposed to have a dinner with 12 dishes - http://www.food.com/bb/viewtopic.zsp?t=385817 - with just the two of us, I won't be doing that, but I am having:



    [/img]
    Plotkeles - the wafer we share


    Savory Kucia - Wheat Berry Salad


    Lithuanian Mixed Vegetable Salad (Darzoviu Misraine)

    Lithuanian Herring Salad With Onion and Tomato (Silke Su Pomidor

    and salmon in a creamy sauce - either a combination of two recipes or perhaps this one, which I love, Salmon With Horseradish "Cream"



    I'm not quite decided about dessert - probably some cranberry kisielius, possibly something else.

    For Christmas Day, I have a ham, will make some kind of potatoes and all the leftovers from Tuesday.
    JoyfulCook
    Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:12 am
    Forum Host
    duonyte wrote:
    Traditionally for Christmas Eve we are supposed to have a dinner with 12 dishes - http://www.food.com/bb/viewtopic.zsp?t=385817 - with just the two of us, I won't be doing that, but I am having:



    [/img]
    Plotkeles - the wafer we share


    Savory Kucia - Wheat Berry Salad


    Lithuanian Mixed Vegetable Salad (Darzoviu Misraine)

    Lithuanian Herring Salad With Onion and Tomato (Silke Su Pomidor

    and salmon in a creamy sauce - either a combination of two recipes or perhaps this one, which I love, Salmon With Horseradish "Cream"



    I'm not quite decided about dessert - probably some cranberry kisielius, possibly something else.

    For Christmas Day, I have a ham, will make some kind of potatoes and all the leftovers from Tuesday.


    That all looks wonderful thanks so much for sharing - are there any other traditional dishes that you obviously choose from, what are they?
    duonyte
    Mon Dec 24, 2012 10:45 am
    Forum Host
    Well, my first disaster of the day - I managed to drop the rice cooker bowl when putting the soaked wheat berries in it, they are on the floor and I'm out of luck.

    I might make fake poppy seed milk with slizikai/preskucia/kuciukaii - pastry nuggets, the name depends on which region you are in. The real recipe calls for you to grind poppy seeds until they exude a white liquid - a milk. Mix in some sweetened water to thin it. This is poured over baked nuggets. A non-dairy cereal, if you will. I fake it these days - learned to do this from my late aunt who would be well over 100 years old if she were still alive. Mix some vanilla into plain milk and pour it over the slizikai. I suppose you could use vanilla flavored soy or almond milk to make it dairy free these days!





    I used to buy these at Lithuanian bakeries and just eat them out of hand, they are tasty.

    Additional dishes would be mushrooms in a sour cream sauce, boiled potatoes with fresh dill, Lithuanian rye bread - a dark sourdough rye, barsciai - a vegetarian beet soup, but enriched with sour cream by mom, saltanosiai - dumplings made with blueberries . A lot of good eating!
    JoyfulCook
    Mon Dec 24, 2012 2:41 pm
    Forum Host
    Well, lets hope that that was the last disaster of the day. The food sounds wonderful,I always love to try new things and your traditional food sounds lovely, We lived in Germany for a while when I was about 10, and I loved their dark round rye bread with the price chalked on the top of it icon_smile.gif

    I am going to cruise through your recipes tomorrow when its quieter
    Stop sending e-mails when someone replies
    Add this to My Favorite Topics
    Alert us of inappropriate posts

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Ideas from Food.com

    Powered by phpBB 2.0.1 © 2002 phpBB Group

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites