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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Q & A / How to cook a dry salt cured ham
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    How to cook a dry salt cured ham

    Go to page << Previous Page  1, 2
    Zeldaz
    Fri Dec 21, 2012 8:44 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    When I got married we drove from MA to SC, stopping to visit my brother-in-law and his VERY pregnant wife at Fort Bragg in NC. We wanted to arrive bearing a gift, so we picked up a Smithfield country ham on the way, as WE would have loved it! It was a terrible present for them, she was in no shape to be cooking it and they were afraid of the mold anyway. Found out years later that they tossed the thing! I could have used that ham...
    He's on wife #3 now.
    ala-kat
    Fri Dec 21, 2012 8:46 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Isabella's Can Opener wrote:
    And we anxiously await your results. I watch Q & A to see what people are cooking so I can add to my cookbooks and gain from the experience of the other chefs.


    The people here are so fantastic!! I'm now confident in my ham cooking, have a good idea what I'm up against. Heck, without the good folks here I probably would never have tried that turkey a couple of years ago - which turned out awesome icon_biggrin.gif The best hot line in town for cooks icon_biggrin.gif
    ala-kat
    Fri Dec 21, 2012 8:48 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Zeldaz wrote:
    When I got married we drove from MA to SC, stopping to visit my brother-in-law and his VERY pregnant wife at Fort Bragg in NC. We wanted to arrive bearing a gift, so we picked up a Smithfield country ham on the way, as WE would have loved it! It was a terrible present for them, she was in no shape to be cooking it and they were afraid of the mold anyway. Found out years later that they tossed the thing! I could have used that ham...
    He's on wife #3 now.


    Oh no!!! Give it away, don't throw it away!!! I got this with no particular date or event in mind so I have no pressure there. Can do it at my own pace, and as it turns out, that is a good thing. Must have been thinking about ham in the can, couple hours in the oven and your good to go icon_eek.gif
    Dee514
    Fri Dec 21, 2012 10:52 pm
    Forum Host
    ala-kat wrote:
    Isabella's Can Opener wrote:
    Ready to cook means raw but cured. now comes the fun part...


    Looking at the site Dee was so kind to add, I think I have a good idea. My one question on it is, after turning the ham after roasting for a while - until it reaches temp - is about what kind of time would I be looking at?


    Directions from the Smithfield website:

    Smithfield Country Ham

    Suggestions for Cooking an Old-Fashioned Favorite

    To prepare ham:

    Wash ham thoroughly in warm water. Use a stiff brush to remove surface mold if present. This mold is in no way injurious. Aged hams, like ages cheeses, mold in the process. To reduce saltiness, soak ham in cold water for 12-24 hours prior to cooking. Changing the water during soaking will aid in drawing salt from the ham. (If a milder salt flavor is desired, soak ham for 36 hours). Cook your ham using the Water or Oven cooking instructions listed below.

    Water Cooking (preferred method):

    Place ham skin side down in vessel and cover with cool water.
    Bring water to 190 F (simmering, not boiling).
    Cook approximately 25 minutes per pound or until 163 F internal temperature.
    Add water as needed to keep ham covered
    When done, take ham from vessel. While the ham is still warm, remove skin and fat as desired.
    If a sweet coating is desired, sprinkle the fat side with brown sugar and bread crumbs and bake in oven at 400 F until brown (approximately 15 minutes)

    Oven Cooking:

    Wrap ham in heavy-duty aluminum foil joining edges carefully and forming a vessel with the bottom layer. Add four cups of water within the foil and place in oven with a tray or shallow pan underneath for support.

    Cook by the following method:

    Preheat oven to 300 F.
    Bake ham for approximately three hours or 20 minutes per pound.
    Using a meat thermometer, check for 163 F internal temperature in the thickest part of ham.
    Remove ham and let cool to room temperature for one hour.
    Remove skin and fat as desired.

    If a sweet coating is desired, sprinkle the fat side with brown sugar and bread crumbs and bake in oven at 400 F until brown (approximately 15 minutes).

    Suggestions for Carving:

    Use a very sharp knife and cut VERY THIN slices. With ham on platter, fat side up, begin slicing about two inches from hock or small end. Make first cut straight through to the bone. Slant the knife for each succeeding cut. Decrease slant as slices become larger.

    CAUTION: Please be careful while slicing ham to avoid personal injury.
    ala-kat
    Fri Dec 21, 2012 11:15 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Thank you for posting this. I don't know where I was at on their site, but these weren't quite what I was seeing elsewhere. What I saw was (at least to me) ambiguous and left me a little confused.

    With everyone's help here, including Smithfield, I am now confident on how to proceed. For whatever reason, be it my reading comprehensive skills, what I found to be not the best instructions, whatever, this is no cheap chunk of meat to not take good care of.

    I have learned a lot in the past few hours, and y'all are to thank for it icon_biggrin.gif I'll be back next week to gloat on what an awesome job I did icon_lol.gif

    Let me add this...an insert (not a pamphlet, book, etc) with the ins and outs of cooking a raw ham would have been welcome. Not asking much here, just instructions for newbies like me. Most people know how to cook a steak, but Omaha Steaks makes sure you know how to do it, just in case you don't.
    Dee514
    Sat Dec 22, 2012 2:05 am
    Forum Host
    Granted, I haven't bought a Smithfield/country ham in many years. The last time I did though it came with a little booklet attached that had the cooking instructions as well as a list of their products. icon_confused.gif
    ala-kat
    Sat Dec 22, 2012 2:28 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Dee514 wrote:
    Granted, I haven't bought a Smithfield/country ham in many years. The last time I did though it came with a little booklet attached that had the cooking instructions as well as a list of their products. icon_confused.gif


    And mine may be a one off...but no, there was nothing more than the little tag stating what final temp you needed. Nothing more, nothing less. Basically nothing. But if you are in the market for those nice little pillow fillers for shipping, just let me know, got plenty icon_biggrin.gif
    Dee514
    Sat Dec 22, 2012 3:32 am
    Forum Host
    ala-kat wrote:
    Dee514 wrote:
    Granted, I haven't bought a Smithfield/country ham in many years. The last time I did though it came with a little booklet attached that had the cooking instructions as well as a list of their products. icon_confused.gif


    And mine may be a one off...but no, there was nothing more than the little tag stating what final temp you needed. Nothing more, nothing less. Basically nothing. But if you are in the market for those nice little pillow fillers for shipping, just let me know, got plenty icon_biggrin.gif


    I wonder if that had anything to do with it (not that it should have)....I used to buy them locally from my butcher, I didn't get it shipped.
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