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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / Bake anything lately?
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    Bake anything lately?

    Go to page << Previous Page  1, 2, 3 ... 13, 14, 15 ... 26, 27, 28  Next Page >>
    Red Apple Guy
    Sun Feb 24, 2013 6:55 am
    Forum Host
    Karyl, by golly, I think you've got it! Looking good.

    To add to all this English Muffin talk, check out this breakfast sandwich using pumpernickel English muffins: http://www.countrycleaver.com/2012/10/breakfast-reuben-sandwiches-with-pumpernickel-english-muffins.html

    Red
    Karyl Lee
    Sun Feb 24, 2013 9:05 am
    Forum Host
    Red, it's as moist and tender as I had hoped this morning, and if it keeps well, I'll be set. Then I can teach people how to do it. icon_biggrin.gif
    JoeV
    Sun Feb 24, 2013 12:51 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    GW, those are mighty fine looking muffins. Might have to try those with my starter.

    This morning I felt like making something different, so I took my Italian bread recipe and made it with 70% hydration and 33% stone ground whole wheat flour. It was a sticky gooey mesh (just like a no knead), but I baked it on my pizza stone and covered it with a SS bowl for 2/3 of the bake time, then uncovered for the balance to brown it up. The crumb was very soft and it got some good height to it. The kids and the granddaughter said it was a keeper.



    Red Apple Guy
    Sun Feb 24, 2013 4:20 pm
    Forum Host
    Very nice, Joe. I like the fact that it didn't split but remains smooth and round. Good looking loaf.
    JoeV
    Sun Feb 24, 2013 5:08 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Red Apple Guy wrote:
    Very nice, Joe. I like the fact that it didn't split but remains smooth and round. Good looking loaf.
    I thought it would split like no-knead does for me, but I guess being under the pot provided enough steam to hold it together. Who knows??? icon_lol.gif Hey, the most important thing is that everyone liked it. It made a great sandwich at lunch time.
    tasb
    Mon Feb 25, 2013 12:29 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Joe V, thanks for the hints on what to do with my mixer. I think it isn't the gears, they look fine. I think it is do to strain I put the mixer under. It is rated for 12 cups flour, but most times when I do the white bread I need 13 cups. I think I really should look into a bigger KA, and maybe pass this one on to my sister or someone who needs it.

    So many great looking baked goods lately. I had to come on to my computer because most of the pics aren't showing up on my phone. Now I am really wishing to bake more often.

    All I have done lately is pull a couple pies out of the freezer and bake them and tonight I made Coconut Cookies.

    The recipes for the pies were, Freezer Apple Pie Filling - OAMC and Freezer Peach Pie Filling and Pie Freezing Method. In summer/fall I make up these pie fillings and put them into pie shells in cheap aluminum pans and freeze. Sometimes I use a crumb topping instead of a pie topping. All I have to do when I want pie it put a frozen pie on a cookie sheet with parchment paper under the pie and bake for 1 hour to 1 hour 20 minutes, depends on how much filling I used. We had the apple pie at home and the peach pie the girls took too school for a class party, they also took a loaf of Zucchini Chocolate Chip Bread too. I made the bread in the summer when I had zucchini coming out of the garden and froze it too.
    Red Apple Guy
    Mon Feb 25, 2013 1:57 pm
    Forum Host
    You've got me hungry, tasb.

    This weekend I smoked another pastrami and baked both deli rye and pumpernickel for the kids coming over one night. I think I'm about saturated on pastrami and rye for a while. Here's some photos. The deli rye was Sourdough Deli Rye and the pumpernickel recipe was Sourdough Pumpernickel.











    And....I've decided my Kitchenaid Pro is not the best equipment for rye breads. I'm considering one of these: http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200356927_200356927?cm_mmc=Google-pla-_-Construction-_-Cement%20Mixers-_-998250&ci_src=17588969&ci_sku=998250&gclid=CLjp6Zqa0rUCFY6e4AodWREAXw

    Red
    JoeV
    Mon Feb 25, 2013 5:20 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Let me know how the CM125 works out. i might also do that upgrade. icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif
    Red Apple Guy
    Mon Feb 25, 2013 6:52 pm
    Forum Host
    These doughs are only 33% rye and 68% hydrated, but the stuff has the feel of wet cement and is about impossible to knead by hand.
    duonyte
    Mon Feb 25, 2013 7:29 pm
    Forum Host
    I've tried making 100% rye, did not work out well, but cement is a good description. The old ladies say the dough is talking to you - that wet, sucking sound when you try to knead it.....
    Donna M.
    Mon Feb 25, 2013 10:40 pm
    Forum Host
    Red Apple Guy wrote:
    And....I've decided my Kitchenaid Pro is not the best equipment for rye breads. I'm considering one of these: http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200356927_200356927?cm_mmc=Google-pla-_-Construction-_-Cement%20Mixers-_-998250&ci_src=17588969&ci_sku=998250&gclid=CLjp6Zqa0rUCFY6e4AodWREAXw

    Red


    Haha, Red! I thought I was going to see a real dough mixer when I clicked on the link. You should look into a Bosch mixer. They can handle that heavy stuff. I'm really loving my Compact model.
    JoeV
    Mon Feb 25, 2013 11:08 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Red Apple Guy wrote:
    These doughs are only 33% rye and 68% hydrated, but the stuff has the feel of wet cement and is about impossible to knead by hand.
    That's why i use the Pro 600 for mixing and not my hands. Rye and whole wheat flour requires additional hydration, but rye tend to be the stiffest dough, even at 33%. I always add more water or milk to these two doughs.
    JoeV
    Thu Feb 28, 2013 3:30 am
    Food.com Groupie
    We had spaghetti for dinner, so I made a couple of Italian baguettes to go with it.



    Red Apple Guy
    Thu Feb 28, 2013 5:50 am
    Forum Host
    Oh wow. Another work of art, buddy. Great slashing on the baguettes. Is that the same Italian dough you normally use or do you change it for baguettes?

    Red
    JoeV
    Thu Feb 28, 2013 7:35 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Red Apple Guy wrote:
    Oh wow. Another work of art, buddy. Great slashing on the baguettes. Is that the same Italian dough you normally use or do you change it for baguettes?

    Red
    Same dough, different shape. I also use it for hamburger buns and hoagie rolls. When used right after cooling, the crumb and crust are soft. I also use my other doughs for the same shapes ,it just depends on what we have a taste for on a particular day.
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