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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Q & A / Question:Pressure cooker chicken stock
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    Question:Pressure cooker chicken stock

    lalapizzaparty
    Sat Dec 08, 2012 4:26 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    The picture looks fabulous. Lots of good gelatin. Wonder about the tradtional step of skimming impurities off the top when pot first comes to aboil. I have always been told this step is imperative for ahealthy broth. Thoughts? Pressure cooker chicken stock
    duonyte
    Sat Dec 08, 2012 4:59 pm
    Forum Host
    There really is no way of skimming this because of the way it's cooked. It may be that the shorter cooking time prevents any cloudiness from "impurities" - it's not a question of healthiness, but of clarity of the broth.
    Zeldaz
    Sat Dec 08, 2012 5:08 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I never boil stock, it makes it cloudy! It never needs skimming that way. Always cook at what I call a "seethe".
    duonyte
    Sat Dec 08, 2012 5:59 pm
    Forum Host
    I cook mine in the crockpot- it stays very clear. I just ladle out the stock and the sediment is all at the bottom.

    Another way to keep the stock clear is to "pre-boil" meat and bones. Cook in boiling water for about 3 or 4 minutes (after it comes back to a boil), then dump into a colander and rinse. This gets rid of the loose proteins that causes the cloudiness.
    Dee514
    Sat Dec 08, 2012 6:25 pm
    Forum Host
    Skimming the stock has absolutely nothing to do with the stock being "healthy"! The only reason for skimming any foam that may appear on the surface of the pot is to help keep the stock clear.

    When ("stove-top") stock is properly made, it shouldn't become cloudy from unskimmed foam/solids, because there shouldn't be any foam/solids to skim. If your stock develops a foam that needs to be removed, you are cooking it at too high a temperature....it should NOT boil.

    According to the pressure cooker recipe in question, step # 5 directs you to strain the finished stock, which should get rid of any solids that could cause cloudiness.
    icon_smile.gif
    DrGaellon
    Sun Dec 09, 2012 9:24 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Dee514 wrote:
    According to the pressure cooker recipe in question, step # 5 directs you to strain the finished stock, which should get rid of any solids that could cause cloudiness.
    icon_smile.gif

    Just straining it will not entrap the finest particulates. If you really want a clear stock from a pressure cooker, you'd have to clarify it. http://www.ehow.com/how_2093862_clarify-stock.html gives good instructions.
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