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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Q & A / Sweet and Low
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    Sweet and Low

    shawniafan00
    Sat Dec 01, 2012 12:29 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Hi I am Sandy and am new to useing this part of the site. I just have a question about using sweeteners. How do I bake with sweet and low. Every time i try whatever i bake it doesn't turn out good at all. I have heard using applesauce, but I don't know how much. If someone could help I would really appriate it. Thank you Sandy
    Chicagoland Chef du Jour
    Sat Dec 01, 2012 1:20 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Welcome! I I have never used it, but hang tight, Someone will be along to help you.
    DrGaellon
    Sat Dec 01, 2012 1:40 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Sugar is an integral part of the structure of most sweet baked goods. Since most artificial sweeteners have no significant volume, they can't replace the sugar properly. You can use "Splenda for Baking," which is half real sugar and half tasteless carbohydrate, with enough sucralose added to make up the difference in sweetness. It's really hard to use Sweet'n'Low (saccharine) to bake.
    Zeldaz
    Sat Dec 01, 2012 2:21 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Most artificial sweeteners can NOT be used for baking because they break down when heated. Use a product made specifically for baking (Splenda baking blend) or find some recipes that use stevia/truvia, which does not break down when cooked.

    Applesauce is normally used as a fat replacer, not a sweetener.
    DrGaellon
    Sat Dec 01, 2012 2:27 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Zeldaz wrote:
    Most artificial sweeteners can NOT be used for baking because they break down when heated.

    That's not actually correct. Of the common artificial sweeteners used in the US today, only aspartame breaks down under heat. Sucralose, saccharine, stevia and acesulfame are all heat-stable.
    Zeldaz
    Sat Dec 01, 2012 3:01 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Straight sucralose (Splenda) is not recommended for baking; Splenda recommends the product be used for only a percentage of the sugar, which is why they market a baking blend, which is formulated to provide both sweetness and structure. Sucralose is also not recommended when making yeasted products, as it has a dampening effect on the yeast. Equal (aspertame) breaks down when exposed to much heat. Although stevia/truvia does not break down, it will not give the structure needed for many baked goods. Finding recipes written for the specific sweetener you wish to use is very important, rather than just substituting an artificial sweetener, especially as many have much higher sweetening power, measure for measure, than sugar.
    auzzi
    Sat Dec 01, 2012 6:53 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    The manufacturer has recipes listed on their website:

    http://www.sweetnlow.com/recipes
    Amberngriffinco
    Sat Dec 01, 2012 8:46 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Been a type 1 diabetic 41 yrs..

    I hated Sweet 'n Low, Equal was a big deal and now I use Stevia. . all the time.

    When I bake, personally, I usually use No Sugar Added Frozen apple juice concentrate or white grape as a sweetener. It helps retain moistness, and I also use home made applesauce as a sweetener and to cut out some of the fat.

    Swt and Low has such a horrid aftertaste, however, my dear old Aunt used it her whole life: swore by it.

    Can you get Stevia where you're at????
    DrGaellon
    Sat Dec 01, 2012 11:20 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Amberngriffinco wrote:
    When I bake, personally, I usually use No Sugar Added Frozen apple juice concentrate or white grape as a sweetener. It helps retain moistness, and I also use home made applesauce as a sweetener and to cut out some of the fat.

    Fruit juices, even without added sugar, are still quite high in fructose. While this will not affect insulin levels, and therefore is (relatively) safe for diabetics, it is not good for calorie counters, nor for those who are post-gastric-bypass.
    pinky kookie
    Sat Dec 01, 2012 11:54 pm
    Food.com Groupie

    I always use Splenda Blend and Splenda Brown Sugar for baking and the baking results and their taste is very good. I have no complains.


    Last edited by pinky kookie on Wed Dec 05, 2012 3:52 pm, edited 2 times in total
    shawniafan00
    Mon Dec 03, 2012 12:42 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I am not sure if we do or not. I apriciate all of your help. Thank you. My husband is a new diabetic and trying to bake for the holidays.
    pinky kookie
    Mon Dec 03, 2012 2:53 pm
    Food.com Groupie

    Thanks for your response, shawniafan. My husband is diabetic too, so I have to use alternatives for sugar when cooking and baking, and I have all this interesting info that maybe can also be useful to you:

    "DRY SWEETENER" OR SUGAR? - 12-05-2003 -
    http://community.cookinglight.com/showthread.php?50785-quot-dry-sweetener-quot-or-sugar-sneezles -
    They could mean sugar or some other form of sweetener in solid form such as granulated corn syrup solids. Very unlikely that a vegan recipe would call for an artificial sweetner.

    To replace 1 cup dry sweetener with 1 cup liquid sweetener: reduce another liquid by 1/3 cup or add 4-5 tablespoons flour.
    To replace 1 cup dry sweetener with 3/4 cup honey: reduce another liquid by 1/4 cup or add 1/3 cup flour.
    To replace 1 cup liquid sweetener with 1 cup dry sweetener: add 1/3 cup water.
    To replace 1 cup liquid sweetener with 3/4 cup honey: add 1/4 cup water.
    Note: When using thick liquid sweeteners, heat the jar in hot water for five minutes to make pouring easier and spray measuring cups with vegetable spray to prevent sticking.

    SWEET SUBSTITUTES -
    1 cup granulated sugar
    ***Substitutes*** -- (Reduce liquid by)
    3/4 cup honey -- (1/8c)
    3/4 cup maple syrup -- (1/8c)
    1 cup maple sugar (granules)
    1/2 cup molasses
    1 cup date sugar (health food)
    1 1/2 cups malt syrup / Barley Malt -- (slightly)
    1 1/2 cups fruit juice concentrate -- (1/8c)
    apple juice, frozen concentrate -- undiluted

    The above measurements are substitutes for 1 cup of sugar. You may need to reduce the amount a liquid in a recipe.
    For example: if a muffin recipe calls for 1 cup of sugar and 1/2 cup water, substitute 3/4 cup honey and 3/8 cup water.

    GUIDE TO NATURAL SWEETENERS & SUBSTITUTIONS -
    http://www.ecomall.com/greenshopping/vlsweet2.htm

    SWEETENER SUBSTITUTIONS -
    To replace 1 cup dry sweetener with 1 cup liquid sweetener: reduce another liquid by 1/3 cup or add 4-5 tablespoons flour.
    To replace 1 cup dry sweetener with 3/4 cup honey: reduce another liquid by 1/4 cup or add 1/3 cup flour.
    To replace 1 cup liquid sweetener with 1 cup dry sweetener: add 1/3 cup water.
    To replace 1 cup liquid sweetener with 3/4 cup honey: add 1/4 cup water.
    Note: When using thick liquid sweeteners, heat the jar in hot water for five minutes to make pouring easier and spray measuring cups with vegetable spray to prevent sticking.


    Last edited by pinky kookie on Mon Dec 03, 2012 2:58 pm, edited 1 time in total
    pinky kookie
    Mon Dec 03, 2012 2:55 pm
    Food.com Groupie

    And here is this more related info for you:

    HOW TO USE APPLESAUCE TO BAKE -
    http://www.wikihow.com/Use-Applesauce-to-Bake

    SUBSTITUING ONE SWEETENER FOR ANOTHER -
    http://www.ecomall.com/greenshopping/vlsweet2.htm
    Written by: John Buscher
    The granulated brown rice and cane juice sweetners are roughly equal in sweetness to refined white, brown, or turbinado sugar and can be substituted on a cup for cup basis without changing to anything else in the recipe.
    When you substitute a liquid sweetener for a dry one or vice versa, you will have to adjust the recipe to end up with the right batter consistency. The chart (below) will help you modify your recipes when using natural sweeteners.

    BEVERAGES WITH LOW & NO LOW CALORIE SWEETENERS -
    http://www.beverageinstitute.org/en_US/pages/beverage-low-no-caloric-sweeteners.html

    NATURAL SWEETENERS
    http://www.simplesocialkitchen.com/about/key-ingredients/natural-sweeteners/

    AVAGE NECTAR - SWEET & NATURAL -
    http://www.vegfamily.com/vegan-cooking-tips/agave.htm

    TIPS FOR SUBSTITUTING AGAVE IN BAKED GOODS -
    http://www.thekitchn.com/5-tips-on-substituting-agave-i-105651

    AGAVE NECTAR SUBSTITUTE -
    http://www.buzzle.com/articles/agave-nectar-substitute.html

    HOW TO USE AGAVE INSTEAD OF HONEY
    http://www.wikihow.com/Use-Agave-Instead-of-Honey
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