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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Critter Cafe / Catz
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    Catz

    Zeldaz
    Sun Nov 25, 2012 9:25 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Our two Beasty Boys were adopted at Free Cat Month at the local shelter in June. We brought them home and released them simultaneously to prevent territorial issues.

    They had very little interaction for the first month, so we were happy when they finally began to play together a little. One had a terrible untreated wound on his back, so he was in two different collars to prevent grooming for two months, except for nightly grooming sessions under constant supervision to prevent him from re-opening the wound. He also turned out to have a tapeworm which has now been taken care of.

    By the way, I recommend the No-Bite Collar, it was SO much better than the vet's hard plastic Elizabethan Collar of Shame! More like a neck brace, much more comfy and no slamming into walls or furniture.

    Anyway, once the collar was permanently removed they started playing more vigorously, and it always ends in a real fight now. We have given up on the water sprayer, it freaks both of them out, and have been scruffing the aggressor like his mother would do. Apparently he never listens to Mama, though.

    They are neutered males, adult, one 3 1/2, the other 5 1/2. We think possibly the younger one (Lefty) just never learned how to stop and pushes the older one farther than he cares to go, as he (Pancho) is always the one defending himself. Pancho is bulkier, but Lefty is longer and younger. We know it's necessary for them to establish their own pecking order, but it hasn't stopped yet!

    These two guys have absolutely no trouble calmly sleeping on the same bed, sharing a lap, or eating next to each other, it's only play that turns into a fight. Feliway hasn't helped

    I thought sharing a litter box might be contributing to it, so we got a second one yesterday and put it in a separate area. Today was pretty peaceful, so we're hoping that's the solution, as they are both great cats, but I'm still curious if anyone has had a similar experience and what they might have done.
    K9 Owned
    Mon Nov 26, 2012 1:12 pm
    Forum Host
    I have no knowledge to share but cat folks will be in later to assist!
    Saralaya
    Mon Nov 26, 2012 2:19 pm
    Forum Host
    Zeldaz wrote:
    Our two Beasty Boys were adopted at Free Cat Month at the local shelter in June. We brought them home and released them simultaneously to prevent territorial issues.

    They had very little interaction for the first month, so we were happy when they finally began to play together a little. One had a terrible untreated wound on his back, so he was in two different collars to prevent grooming for two months, except for nightly grooming sessions under constant supervision to prevent him from re-opening the wound. He also turned out to have a tapeworm which has now been taken care of.

    By the way, I recommend the No-Bite Collar, it was SO much better than the vet's hard plastic Elizabethan Collar of Shame! More like a neck brace, much more comfy and no slamming into walls or furniture.

    Anyway, once the collar was permanently removed they started playing more vigorously, and it always ends in a real fight now. We have given up on the water sprayer, it freaks both of them out, and have been scruffing the aggressor like his mother would do. Apparently he never listens to Mama, though.

    They are neutered males, adult, one 3 1/2, the other 5 1/2. We think possibly the younger one (Lefty) just never learned how to stop and pushes the older one farther than he cares to go, as he (Pancho) is always the one defending himself. Pancho is bulkier, but Lefty is longer and younger. We know it's necessary for them to establish their own pecking order, but it hasn't stopped yet!

    These two guys have absolutely no trouble calmly sleeping on the same bed, sharing a lap, or eating next to each other, it's only play that turns into a fight. Feliway hasn't helped

    I thought sharing a litter box might be contributing to it, so we got a second one yesterday and put it in a separate area. Today was pretty peaceful, so we're hoping that's the solution, as they are both great cats, but I'm still curious if anyone has had a similar experience and what they might have done.


    Hi Zeldaz,

    I hope that the second litter box helps. the recommendation is always for one box per cat plus one...but personally I've never had room for three and two boxes seem to work really well here.

    Has your vet seen Lefty? Very often aggressive behavior can be the result of a medical problem. For example, cats with thyroid problems can become aggressive. If there is no medical cause, then you have to deal with behavior modification, as you have tried.

    I looked at the Cornell Vet School website regarding this and they had several suggestions, one of which you have already done....separate litter boxes.

    Here is the whole paragraph about male cats fighting:

    "Male cats are often involved in inter-cat aggression, which usually erupts as one cat reaches social maturity at two to four years of age. Although this type of aggression is usually seen in males due to hormone-driven competition for mates, it can occur between cats of any sex when territorial conflicts occur. Such cats exhibit the typical signs of aggression: flattened ears, puffed-up hair, hissing, and howling.

    Because there is a hormonal component, the first step toward alleviating this aggression is to neuter or spay all cats involved. If this has already been done, the cats should be separated, each with their own food, water, and litter box, whenever they are unsupervised. When you are monitoring them, they should be rewarded with treats for peaceful interactions. Put distinct sounding bells on breakaway collars on each cat so that you know their whereabouts. Immediately startle them with a loud noise (i.e. a compressed air canister, or shaken jar of pennies) or a squirt from a water gun whenever they behave aggressively. "

    (here is the link if you want to see the whole page.... http://www.vet.cornell.edu/fhc/brochures/aggression.html )

    Maybe having them eat separately would help if you have room. I sort of like the "treat for good behavior" suggestion. The belled collars is an interesting suggestion, if they will keep collars on!

    Another suggestion is to find some good interactive toys for them and play with them whenever you can. This will redirect some of their natural aggressive behavior towards the toys and away from each other- it may also tire them out so that maybe Lefty will be less interested in annoying Pancho! I learned this quite awhile ago and it's all over the research I did before answering you. It happens when the cat's natural instinct to hunt has no other outlet except the other cat in the house or the people!

    Here is a link to another article on the same topic (it's a pretty common issue)

    http://www.catcaresociety.org/social.html


    My only other comment is to ask you if they each have a place of their own, where they feel safe... preferably some place up off the ground. A shelf with a towel on it or the top of a sturdy piece of furniture. It's possible that Lefty feels unsafe and therefore feels the need to constantly be on guard.... Each of my girls has their own spots, which they have claimed as their own. Initially they could not both be on the bed with me at the same time without a hissing, spitting and swatting episode... but I made them both leave when that happened. Now they each have their own place on the bed and they stick to it.

    One more question... do they fight when you are NOT around or only when you are around to see it? Lefty may be trying to "claim" you as HIS person...

    At any rate... there is a lot of literature on this, some of which is repetitive, but here is another one from a reputable source:

    http://www.catsinternational.org/articles/aggression_to_cats/index.html

    Good luck! Let us know how it goes!
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