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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / Stiff bread
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    Stiff bread

    Passionforbread
    Tue Nov 20, 2012 9:13 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Hi, I am making finish coffee bread. In the process of kneading I was looking for the thin membrane that indicates that the bread is ready. I continued to knead, at speed 2 or 4, and add dough and it would almost get there but not quite. The recipe says to knead until stiff. What did I do wrong? I used to do this by hand and it is the first time with my kitchen aid mixer. I make whole wheat bread which comes out wonderfully. Thank you In advance.
    Donna M.
    Tue Nov 20, 2012 11:01 pm
    Forum Host
    I'm sorry I can't help you because I don't use a mixer for my doughs. Hopefully someone will come along who knows. Did you finish your bread? How did it turn out? It may be helpful if you posted your recipe so someone could troubleshoot for you. Have you made this particular recipe before?

    Oh, and welcome to the forum! We are happy to have you here!!
    duonyte
    Wed Nov 21, 2012 8:38 am
    Forum Host
    When I use a kitchenaid to make my dough, I always knead it for a few minutes after removing it from the machine. That is the best way to judge the texture and consistency of the dough.

    You should not be using significantly more or less flour than you would in making it by hand. There are always small variances when working with flour, of course, but the amounts should be pretty close. Once the dough forms a ball around the dough hook, you should be close to done. Finishing by hand would likely give you the assurance that it's properly formed dough.
    Ninetyniner
    Mon Nov 26, 2012 4:42 pm
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    In my experience with my Kitchen Aid mixer the dough soon leaves the side of the bowl before it is kneaded enough. The dough hooks are not properly formed and is to far away from the side of the bowl for proper kneading. I always knead by hand for a couple of minutes to ensure the gluten is properly stretched. The dough should have an elasticity to it before proofing. You can also purchase Gluten in your local bulk food section. Add 1 Tablespoon per cup of flour. AP flour does not make very good bread as it's low in gluten.
    JoeV
    Mon Nov 26, 2012 11:18 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Passionforbread wrote:
    Hi, I am making finish coffee bread. In the process of kneading I was looking for the thin membrane that indicates that the bread is ready. I continued to knead, at speed 2 or 4, and add dough and it would almost get there but not quite. The recipe says to knead until stiff. What did I do wrong? I used to do this by hand and it is the first time with my kitchen aid mixer. I make whole wheat bread which comes out wonderfully. Thank you In advance.
    I believe what you are referring to is "window paneing," where when you stretch the dough it is elastic enough that it will stretch to the point where you can almost see through it. I have read about this, and used to agonize over weather or not my dough was up to some bread guru's strange stretching habits. I never saw grandma trying to look through her bread dough, and she made fabulous bread. She kneaded the dough until it was as "smooth as a baby's butt." Every parent knows what that feels like, so stop kneading when the dough gets there. If you have a standard KitchenAid mixer, mix the dough for 7 minutes on speed #3 (KA Pro 600 6 minutes on #2), pull it out, knead to shape it into a ball and throw it in a greased bowl to rise. No agony, no window panes. Just nice dough.

    Red Apple Guy
    Tue Nov 27, 2012 9:01 am
    Forum Host
    Like JoeV, I gave up trying to obtain a windowpane. Instead, I knead for a reasonable time (6 or 7 minutes) by hand or machine and then I do some stretching and folding. During the first part of the fermentation, I'll stretch the dough out on the counter and fold it letter-style top to bottom and side to side. it's amazing how it strengthens the dough. Two times, 10 minutes apart seems to really help. I call it kneading insurance.

    Red
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