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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / White Lily flour vs. Cake flour
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    White Lily flour vs. Cake flour

    The_Swedish_Chef
    Wed Mar 11, 2009 1:13 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Greetings! Okay, I'm a Northern gal and we have King Arthur and Gold Medal flour up here. I have a recipe for Crunchy Buttermilk biscuits that requires White Lily flour. I just did a search, from their website, for any store in a 50 mile area for this brand and there is nothing!

    What White Lily recommends if you're using All Purpose flour that the ratio is 1 cup of A.P. = 1 cup + 2 tablespoons of W.Lily. However, according to the website, W.L. is famous for it's eiderdown-like qualities.

    That got me thinking about Swan's Down cake flour, of which I have plenty. Do you think that the cake flour and W.Lily would be comparable?

    I'd like to make these tomorrow as the weather is going to be wretched and freezing; I can't think of a nicer thing to have at dinner.

    Thanks for any help on this subject.
    Chocolatl
    Wed Mar 11, 2009 2:27 am
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    I haven't used White Lily, but since the ratio is approximately the same as cake flour, it could work. Cake flour and biscuit flour are both lower in protein than AP.
    The_Swedish_Chef
    Wed Mar 11, 2009 9:43 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Chocolatl wrote:
    I haven't used White Lily, but since the ratio is approximately the same as cake flour, it could work. Cake flour and biscuit flour are both lower in protein than AP.


    Thank you for your answer! We have cake flour, up North, galore so I'll try that. I've heard about White Lily from a lot of my Southern Zaar friends but it's never made it this far North.

    I'll give it a go and see what happens to those biscuits. icon_biggrin.gif
    Kerfuffle-Upon-Wincle
    Wed Mar 11, 2009 12:43 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    The_Swedish_Chef wrote:
    Chocolatl wrote:
    I haven't used White Lily, but since the ratio is approximately the same as cake flour, it could work. Cake flour and biscuit flour are both lower in protein than AP.


    Thank you for your answer! We have cake flour, up North, galore so I'll try that. I've heard about White Lily from a lot of my Southern Zaar friends but it's never made it this far North.

    I'll give it a go and see what happens to those biscuits. icon_biggrin.gif


    I was taught in my college foods class to use this substitution for cake flour: 1 cup all purpose flour, MINUS two tablespoons.

    I've always bought White Lily flour, but have no idea how it compares to Gold Medal when making biscuits ~ I've never seen Biscuit Flour in our grocery stores!
    The_Swedish_Chef
    Wed Mar 11, 2009 12:48 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Oh, there's no such thing as "biscuit flour". This is a recipe from Edna Lewis who said that the basis of all good Southern baking was because of White Lily flour. It's a special blend that works 'down south'; I'm going to guess because of the increased humidity, but who knows.

    Because White Lily's own website has a substitution of how to use W.L. instead of All Purpose flour, and they also say how W.L. is an exceptionally 'fluffy and light flour', I thought maybe cake flour would fit the bill.
    Chocolatl
    Wed Mar 11, 2009 1:16 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I know there's nothing labeled "biscuit flour." I was talking about the pastry/White Lily type.

    AP for cake flour is 1 cup minus 2 tablespoons AP to a cup of cake flour in the recipe, or 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons cake flour to a cup of AP flour in the recipe. It's not really an exact substitution, just a make-do. But since ratio is the same, I don't see why cake flour wouldn't work.
    Chef #1215206
    Wed Mar 25, 2009 11:27 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Well, I'm from the south, and I've always understood what was special about White Lily was that it was made from soft winter wheat.
    Mama's Kitchen (Hope)
    Thu Apr 02, 2009 6:31 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I am wondering if you tried it and how it worked? I am from the south and all the above statements are true.


    I would definitely use cake flour as a substitute- in the same amount called for in the recipe.

    If you really want 'them biscuits' light and fluffy try mixing all the dry ingredients together then sift the mixture. Then add your wet ingredients and mix gently. PAT the biscuits out gently. Press cutter straight down on dough then twist to cut.

    If your bowl and utensils are chilled all the better.

    HTH
    Burnt noodles
    Sat Mar 12, 2011 6:18 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Haven't got to try baking with White Lily, but I've had pretty good luck with the Swan's Down cake flour. Made my best batch this morn, but, still working out some of the kinks.
    Deni Luna
    Thu Mar 24, 2011 12:49 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Use southern soft wheat-derived White Lily flour for cakes and biscuits. (Northern wheat like King Arthur flour is made from "hard" winter wheat with a higher protein/gluten content -- good for breads and pizzas.

    White Lily can be ordered online through the Smuckers company, the jam people. Call them -- they are super friendly. Treat yourself. Good luck!
    flyingfish7000
    Sun Jul 24, 2011 2:26 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I haven't had the pleasure of using While Lily. It's not available even in Baltimore and that's below the line. Why is it so difficult to find? Walmart's listed but they don't have it. Nor does Food Lion, Giant Food, Shoppers, ... I'm running out of gas. I haven't called Smuckers but they only offer a combination of different flour products on line. I don't want corn meal just White Lily AP Flour. Gold Medal is ok but it makes heavy and inconsistent biscuits, short cake, etc. Can I blend cake flour with Gold Medal AP? If so at what ratio?
    Flyingfish7000 at yahoo.com edited by host to prevent spambots from picking it up
    duonyte
    Sun Jul 24, 2011 5:19 pm
    Forum Host
    Wheat is heavy and flour mills tend to use locally or at most regionally purchased wheat to make flour. The White Lily flour is made from the soft wheat that grows in the south - that wheat would not withstand the northern winters. I notice that when I buy wheat grains in the market for wheatberry salads, they are all hard wheat grains.

    Somewhere I have a link to a paper that analyzed the major brands and identified the protein strength in each. i think you could approximate WL by combining cake flour, which is much softer, lower protein, with norther AP flour. I'll see if I can find that.
    Wheres_the_Beef?
    Sat Nov 17, 2012 3:09 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Here’s a list of some flours and their protein contents, from the book Cookwise by Shirley O. Corriher:

    Cake flours (Swans Down, Softasilk):
    7.5 to 8.5% protein

    Bleached southern all-purpose (White Lily, Martha White, Gladiola, Red Band):
    7.5 to 9.5% protein

    National brand self-rising (Gold Medal, Pillsbury):
    9 to 10% protein

    National brand bleached all-purpose (Gold Medal, Pillsbury):
    10 to 12% protein

    Northern all-purpose (Robin Hood, Hecker’s):
    11 to 12% protein

    Northern unbleached all-purpose (King Arthur):
    11.7% protein

    Bread Flour:
    11.5 to 12.5% protein
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