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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Critter Cafe / Week 5 Class - the phony baloney good time banana
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    Week 5 Class - the phony baloney good time banana

    Krislady
    Sun Nov 11, 2012 10:42 am
    Forum Host
    Well, another not unsuccessful class yesterday. icon_smile.gif

    We ran though the regular stuff - Jar's still somewhat resisting heeling - though we had a short-ish walk yesterday morning, so he wasn't too tired and uncooperative. We did our heeling exercise in the hall, away from the other dogs, though he could still see them, and he did fine. AND Bob (the instructor) was able to see him. We still need work on corners, but we'll get there.

    Then we went into the room and did the sit-down-stay-come hand signal exercises which he knows COLD.

    Only this time he was all "hey, Bob, how's it going, yeah, in a minute, lemme get a drink of water first, okay what did you want again?" and then walking all tired and achy-acting.

    Bob was very concerned about the limpy stuff - I told him that CLEARLY Jar did not want to be there. He said, well, he was just doing fine in the hall, and I said, yeah, the hall's not a roomful of dogs. And he's figured out that people (not naming any names) tend to cut him more slack when he's all tired and sore and limping.

    Seriously. He was barely dragging himself across the room last week, and as soon as we were done and went outside, he made a miraculous recovery and was practically prancing down the street. icon_rolleyes.gif

    So anyway.

    The lady with the friendly little cutie dog is determined to get her dog within tongue's reach (Jar's tongue, not her dog's tongue) and live to tell the tale. I went into kitty-treat-time mode - Jar lying down, and each of them getting a treat, with happy joy all around.

    Our new "thing" for the week was "wait" - as in, you wander to the doorway, dog walks with you - although it's not a "let's go" or a heel - it's just more that apparently I'm not the only one whose dog needs to be Up My Butt every minute. icon_wink.gif So you get to the doorway, tell the dog to wait, and the dog just . . . waits. He can sit, he can lie down, he can wander off, he can go out for a beer, we don't care. Just don't follow me.

    Heh. We do that all the time, so that one was cake. icon_smile.gif

    BUT - and this is huge! Remember how he had the dogs heeling in figure-8 around other people with dogs? And we just sort of observed, which is fine, because it's a good thing for Jar to just watch other dogs wandering around and not caring.

    So anyway, once they were all done, Bob had all the dogs kind of gather toward the center of the room in a circle, THEN he had me take Jar and heel him around the room, AROUND ALL THE OTHER DOGS. And he did it! He held it together, though it was not easy for him. As were were finishing, one dog relaxed and started milling around, right near Jar, and I could feel Jar tense - then he stopped and LOOKED UP AT ME! Yay! boy, I treated the daylights out of him then!

    So we've got one more week of this class, then we'll re-start the same class. After all, I don't have anything else to do Saturdays, right? icon_wink.gif
    Saralaya
    Sun Nov 11, 2012 12:33 pm
    Forum Host
    Hard work but sounds like it was well worth it and will continue to be..... Jar...the ham.... going to be nominated for a Doggy Emmy I think, for Best- Acting-Like-I'm-Injured!
    K9 Owned
    Sun Nov 11, 2012 12:39 pm
    Forum Host
    Ok, so the subject line was a grabber! icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif

    I had a young dog once upon a time that would 'limp' whenever you asked him to do something he didn't want to. It looked so pitiful. Introduce a treat or a meal and the dog took a mental trip to Lourdes, was healed and sprinted towards food. They know how to works us for sure.

    Great going with Jarly!!! The meet and greet with the other little dog was an awesome display of how far he has come. Heeling around the others without a fuss or tension is heartwarming. grouphug.gif
    Krislady
    Mon Nov 12, 2012 11:18 am
    Forum Host
    Thanks, guys. icon_smile.gif

    I'll tell you, my heart was in my throat the whole time I was walking around that room with him! Especially when we were passing the (not too swift-seeming) lady with the reportedly reactive GSD. icon_eek.gif Bob actually moseyed over there to stand between them and us, as well - he said that was NOT a fight he wanted to break up. Jar powered through like a trooper, though. icon_smile.gif

    I'm having trouble, sort of, with finding the line between REQUIRING him to comply and making training sessions not-fun. icon_confused.gif

    I mean, if we're walking along, and I tell him "Jarly, heel" and I'm all perky and smiley and stuff, I don't want him to LOOK THE OTHER WAY and ignore me, you know? (Not to mention that it's kind of hard to sound happy and cheery when I want to say, hey, jerk, I'm talking to you!)

    But when I correct him, that's not so fun, and he does get stubborn. But training is supposed to be FUN FUN FUN, right?

    What's been happening is that I've been settling for less-than-perfect heeling - heck, there are days that if he doesn't turn around and walk the other way, I'm doing well - and I really don't want to reward that, either.

    SIGH

    But still - heeling around the roomful of dogs is HUGE! icon_biggrin.gif
    K9 Owned
    Mon Nov 12, 2012 12:18 pm
    Forum Host
    Krislady wrote:
    Thanks, guys. icon_smile.gif

    I'll tell you, my heart was in my throat the whole time I was walking around that room with him! Especially when we were passing the (not too swift-seeming) lady with the reportedly reactive GSD. icon_eek.gif Bob actually moseyed over there to stand between them and us, as well - he said that was NOT a fight he wanted to break up. Jar powered through like a trooper, though. icon_smile.gif

    I'm having trouble, sort of, with finding the line between REQUIRING him to comply and making training sessions not-fun. icon_confused.gif

    I mean, if we're walking along, and I tell him "Jarly, heel" and I'm all perky and smiley and stuff, I don't want him to LOOK THE OTHER WAY and ignore me, you know? (Not to mention that it's kind of hard to sound happy and cheery when I want to say, hey, jerk, I'm talking to you!)

    But when I correct him, that's not so fun, and he does get stubborn. But training is supposed to be FUN FUN FUN, right?

    What's been happening is that I've been settling for less-than-perfect heeling - heck, there are days that if he doesn't turn around and walk the other way, I'm doing well - and I really don't want to reward that, either.

    SIGH

    But still - heeling around the roomful of dogs is HUGE! icon_biggrin.gif

    Please remember that heeling is one of the hardest things to nail. It really can take years depending on the level of performance you require. It is not a natural thing for a dog to walk along with a world full of sights and smell to stay glued to your side disregarding his surroundings. Cut yourselves some slack and go slow.

    Heeling also requires a great deal of concentration on the dogs part and they get mentally drained as you know. Chase heeled beautifully but I regret that I powered through it with him...drill, drill, drill. It wasn't fun. When we were taking trial prep classes a trainer there turned me around on it. When Chase had heeled for a little bit she'd call out 'Break it off and play!". That consisted of a few seconds of tug or a little rough housing. Just enough to give him a mental break and then we'd resume. It became much more fun for him. I taught Chase to tug with his leash. (fold up the couple of feet closest to you hands) The theory behind that was that while you won't always be carrying toys you will always have a leash.

    Do you have a word that you use to get attention? His name or 'look'? I use both for different occasions. I'm teaching Dawson to give me eye contact when I say his name. If I want him to heel I would say "Dawson (get the attention) then HEEL as I step out treating quickly. You know to end on a high note so maybe do shorter - like 1 or 2 minute sessions for heeling, have a party then switch to something else then back to heeling.

    I also don't correct unless I KNOW that he KNOWS a behaviour completely. IMO it's better to lure him back to your left side with kissy sounds, a treat or whatever and then praise when he is in the correct position. Sorry this is so long but I don't want you to beat yourself up or stress Jar unnecessarily.
    Krislady
    Mon Nov 12, 2012 1:32 pm
    Forum Host
    I wonder if maybe I've been pushing him too hard?

    Usually, we'll walk a bit, he's sniffy all over the place, stops and pees, basically takes care of what he needs to take care of, THEN I'll have him heel.

    Because we're in a mainly residential area, I kind of try to keep track of how many houses we walk by - WHEN he's cooperating, I can get him to do 2 or 3 houses, but it involves constant "yes, good boy, yes, yes, who's my boy," with occasional reminders - HEEL, yes, good boy, yes - and I do try to release him BEFORE his attention starts wandering - usually a couple of reminders, then, once he's giving me what I want, I'll release and treat, then it's back to sniffing and peeing.

    It's only when he REFUSES to look at me that I correct him. I mean, I'll say "heel" and he'll actually turn his head AWAY from me! (jerk) My reaction is generally OH HECK NO - correction - "HEEL" (still smiling).

    And still, I don't want to just let it go - though that's when I'll settle for looking at me and taking a step or two, then I'll release him, ideally before he looks away.

    Stubborn sod. I keep telling him he's just like his brother Josh. icon_rolleyes.gif
    K9 Owned
    Mon Nov 12, 2012 2:01 pm
    Forum Host
    LMBO!
    They really are clever buggers! I remember when we were trialling and doing directed jumping etc. It was all hand signals - no voice at all allowed. So my dog would 'go out', turn around, face me and sit waiting for the next instruction. This is timed btw. So there he'd be sitting body facing me but looking absolutely everywhere else including over his shoulder. He knew if he couldn't 'see' me he couldn't possibly be expected to do another exercise. icon_rolleyes.gif

    The regime you are following sounds just fine - it doesn't sound like you are pushing him. The following is not 'positive' training but we used to use a small poke or pinch (a very little one) on the shoulder or flank to get their attention in those circumstances. Like I'd be heeling with him for example - he'd wander around or lag and I'd poke or pinch and say 'Hey'. It would get his attention and we'd start again. A sorta kinda correction.
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