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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Q & A / Question:Polenta and Sausage Pies
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    Question:Polenta and Sausage Pies

    livingstonfran
    Thu Nov 08, 2012 8:55 pm
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    Polenta and Sausage Pies

    My husband would go nuts over this recipe and I would like very much to make for him. My problem is that, I can not find instant polenta any where. I can find instant grits ( go figure.) I am willing to make the polenta from scratch but what about the 2 Tablespoons of instant polenta that goes into the sausage mixture. Is there some thing else that I could use as a substitute, oh say like instant grits?
    The people working this site are so awesome and have always been so helpful. Thank you so much for your time and assistance. Have a great rest of the week.
    DrGaellon
    Thu Nov 08, 2012 9:36 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Grits and polenta are fairly similar, especially the instant varieties. I bet you could substitute without much trouble.
    ala-kat
    Fri Nov 09, 2012 3:46 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    something I recently read, and found funny....

    'Polenta' is just a high falutin term for cold grits.

    edit: when I say 'cold grits', I'm referring to grits that have gone cold and set up, became thick.
    livingstonfran
    Fri Nov 09, 2012 7:17 pm
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    Thank you so much for taking the time to answer my question. I knew that grits and polenta were made from corn and I thought I might be able to get away with the swap. Thank you for verifying that for me.
    livingstonfran
    Fri Nov 09, 2012 7:18 pm
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    Thank you so much for taking the time to answer my question and validating my thoughts.
    Zeldaz
    Fri Nov 09, 2012 7:36 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Polenta (made from corn meal, grits are made from hominy, which is corn that has been treated with lime) is also eaten hot, like mashed potatoes. When cold, it can be sliced and fried, or grilled. Grits will make a satisfactory substitute, however.
    DrGaellon
    Sat Nov 10, 2012 6:13 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Zeldaz wrote:
    Polenta (made from corn meal, grits are made from hominy, which is corn that has been treated with lime) is also eaten hot, like mashed potatoes. When cold, it can be sliced and fried, or grilled. Grits will make a satisfactory substitute, however.

    The Italians refer to "thin polenta" and "thick polenta." Thin polenta is like porridge and can be used as breakfast, or as a side dish for meats. Thick polenta is stiff, and once it's cold can be sliced.
    Zeldaz
    Sat Nov 10, 2012 10:16 am
    Food.com Groupie
    There are also different grades of fineness/coarseness, but I suspect instant polenta is probably pretty fine. I'd like to know how polenta/cornmeal mush came to be such an Italian thing, as corn was a new world crop. Then again, so were tomatoes. Maybe they just knew a good thing when they saw it.
    I horrified a friend in South Carolina by slicing up some cold grits, frying them in bacon fat, and topping with (horrors!) the dreaded Yankee maple syrup. I don't think she ever got over that abomination.
    Dee514
    Sat Nov 10, 2012 11:15 am
    Forum Host
    Zeldaz wrote:
    I horrified a friend in South Carolina by slicing up some cold grits, frying them in bacon fat, and topping with (horrors!) the dreaded Yankee maple syrup. I don't think she ever got over that abomination.

    rotfl.gif rotfl.gif rotfl.gif
    That made my day Zelda, thanks for sharing.
    (BTW that is yummy icon_wink.gif )
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    Corn has been around in Europe since the early 1500's, when Columbus brought it back to Spain from his second trip.
    Origin, History, and Uses of Corn
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