Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Middle East & North Africa / NA/ME TRAVELS TO MOROCCO IN NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2012!
    Lost? Site Map

    NA/ME TRAVELS TO MOROCCO IN NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2012!

    Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next Page >>
    Elmotoo
    Fri Nov 02, 2012 2:59 pm
    Forum Host
    .............................................

    Morocco is a country with a multiethnic society and a rich culture, civilization, and etiquette. Throughout Moroccan history, Morocco has hosted many peoples, in addition to the indigenous Berbers, coming from the East (Phoenicians, Jews, and Arabs), South (Sub-Saharan African), and North (Romans and Vandals). All of these have had an impact on the social structure of Morocco. It has also hosted many forms of belief, from Paganism, Judaism, Christianity to Islam.
    .......................[/colr]

    Each region possesses its own uniqueness, contributing to the national culture. Morocco has set among its top priorities, the protection of its diversity, and the preservation of its cultural heritage.

    ..............................................................................................................

    In the political world, Morocco is referred to as an African state. The majority of Morocco's population is Arab by identity. At least a third of the population speaks the Amazigh language. During the Islamic expansion, some Arabs came to Morocco and settled in the flat regions, such as Tadla and Doukkala. For example, there are groups called Charkawa and Arbawa who settled in Morocco from Arabia. The Charkawa claimed to be descended from Umar ibn Al-Khattab, the second caliph of Islam.
    .............................................

    Traditional clothing
    A Moroccan kaftan
    The traditional dress for men and women is called djellaba; a long, loose, hooded garment with full sleeves. For special occasions, men also wear a red cap called a bernousse, more commonly referred to as a Fez. Women wear kaftans decorated with ornaments. Nearly all men, and most women, wear balgha (بلغه) —- soft leather slippers with no heel, often dyed yellow. Women also wear high-heeled sandals, often with silver or gold tinsel.

    The distinction between a djellaba and a kaftan is that the djellaba has a hood, while a kaftan does not. Most women’s djellabas are brightly colored and have ornate patterns, stitching, or beading, while men's djellabas are usually plainer and colored neutrally. Women are strongly attached to their "Moroccan wardrobe," despite the financial costs involved; the production of such garments is relatively expensive, as most of the work is done by hand, yet most women purchase a minimum of one new kaftan or takchita every year, normally for a special social event, such as a religious festival or a wedding. These days, it is an unwritten rule that traditional Moroccan dress is worn at such events.

    ............................................................................

    Moroccan architecture
    Dar, the name given to one of the most common types of domestic structures in Morocco, is a home found in a medina, or walled urban area of a city. Most Moroccan homes traditionally adhere to the Dar al-Islam, a series of tenets on Islamic domestic life. Dar exteriors are typically devoid of ornamentation and windows, except occasional small openings in secondary quarters, such as stairways and service areas. These piercings provide light and ventilation. Dars are typically composed of thick, high walls that protect inhabitants from thievery, animals, and other such hazards; however, they have a much more symbolic value from an Arabic perspective. In this culture the exterior represents a place of work, while the interior represents a place of refuge. Thus, Moroccan interiors are often very lavish in decoration and craft.

    Consistent with most Islamic architecture, dars are based around small open-air patios, surrounded by very tall thick walls, to block direct light and minimize heat. Intermediary triple-arched porticos lead to usually two to four symmetrically located rooms. These rooms have to be long and narrow, creating very vertical spaces, because the regional resources and construction technology typically only allow for joists that are usually less than thirteen feet.

    Upon entering a dar, guests move through a zigzagging passageway that hides the central courtyard. The passageway opens to a staircase leading to an upstairs reception area called a dormiria, which often is the most lavish room in the home adorned with decorative tilework, painted furniture, and piles of embroidered pillows and rugs. More affluent families also have greenhouses and a second dormiria, accessible from a street-level staircase. Service quarters and stairways were always at the corners of the structures.
    .......................................................................................

    Moroccan cuisine is extremely refined, thanks to Morocco's interactions and exchanges with other cultures and nations over the centuries. Moroccan cuisine has been subject to Berber, Moorish, and Arab influences.
    ......................................
    IngredientsMorocco produces a large range of Mediterranean fruits and vegetables and even some tropical ones. Common meats include beef, mutton and lamb, chicken, camel, rabbit and seafood, which serve as a base for the cuisine. Characteristic flavorings include lemon pickle, cold-pressed, unrefined olive oil and dried fruits. It is also known for being far more heavily spiced than Middle Eastern cuisine.
    ..........................................
    Spices & other flavoringsSpices are used extensively in Moroccan food. Although spices have been imported to Morocco for thousands of years, many ingredients, like saffron from Tiliouine, mint and olives from Meknes, and oranges and lemons from Fez, are home-grown. Common spices include karfa (cinnamon), kamoun (cumin), kharkoum (turmeric), skinjbir (ginger), libzar (pepper), tahmira (paprika), anise seed, sesame seeds, qesbour (coriander), and zaafran beldi (saffron). Common herbs include mint and 'maadnous'(parsley.)
    ....................................................................
    Structure of meals The midday meal is the main meal, except during the holy month of Ramadan. A typical meal begins with a series of hot and cold salads, followed by a tagine. Bread is eaten with every meal. Often, for a formal meal, a lamb or chicken dish is next, followed by couscous topped with meat and vegetables. A cup of sweet mint tea usually ends the meal. Moroccans usually eat with their hands and use bread as a utensil. The consumption of pork and alcohol are considered Haraam, and are prohibited per Muslim dietary restrictions.
    .........................................................
    Main Dishes The main Moroccan Berber dish most people are familiar with is couscous, the old national delicacy. Beef is the most commonly eaten red meat in Morocco. Lamb is also consumed, but as North African sheep breeds store most of their fat in their tails, Moroccan lamb does not have the pungent flavour that Western lamb and mutton have. Poultry is also very common, and the use of seafood is increasing in Moroccan food. Among the most famous Moroccan Berber dishes are Couscous, Pastilla (also spelled Bsteeya or Bestilla), Tajine, Tanjia and Harira. Although the latter is a soup, it is considered as a dish in itself and is served as such or with dates especially during the month of Ramadan. Pork consumption is forbidden in accordance with Sharia, religious laws of Islam.
    .........................................
    Salads
    Salads include both raw and cooked ingredients, served either hot or cold. Cold salads include zaalouk, an eggplant and tomato mixture, and taktouka (a mixture of tomatoes, green peppers, garlic and spices).

    Desserts
    Usually, seasonal fruits rather than cooked desserts are served at the close of a meal. A common dessert is kaab el ghzal ("gazelle's horns"), a pastry stuffed with almond paste and topped with sugar. Another is " Halwa shebakia ", pretzel-shaped dough deep-fried, dipped into a hot pot of honey and sprinkled with sesame seeds. Halwa Shebakia are cookies eaten during the month of Ramadan. Coconut fudge cakes, 'Zucre Coco', are popular also.
    ........................................................
    BeveragesThe most popular drink is green tea with mint. Traditionally, making good mint tea in Morocco is considered an art form and the drinking of it with friends and family is often a daily tradition. The pouring technique is as crucial as the quality of the tea itself. Moroccan tea pots have long, curved pouring spouts and this allows the tea to be poured evenly into tiny glasses from a height. For the best taste, glasses are filled in two stages. The Moroccans traditionally like tea with bubbles, so while pouring they hold the teapot high above the glasses. Finally, the tea is accompanied with hard sugar cones or lumps.
    .....................................................

    **this is taken directly from Wikipedia if you want to read more:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moroccan_cuisine & http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culture_of_Morocco In light of Sandy, I'm not doing much research this time. The food photos are from unreviewed or little reviewed Moroccan recipes here at Food.com. Search recipes, narrow to Moroccan, narrow by photos & go to the end, work your way back. Happy cooking!** Beth


    Last edited by Elmotoo on Mon Dec 31, 2012 11:22 am, edited 2 times in total
    Elmotoo
    Fri Nov 02, 2012 3:12 pm
    Forum Host
    THE MOROCCAN COOKBOOK! NA/ME Visits MOROCCO! #580445
    Elmotoo
    Fri Nov 02, 2012 3:14 pm
    Forum Host
    TAGS!

    11/2
    icon_biggrin.gif Annacia Moorish Moroccan Chicken Tagine #290607 by Clare 'E-Foodie' Jones

    11/4
    icon_biggrin.gif Annacia - Hasa Al Hummus -- Moroccan Chickpea Soup #140868
    by Hajar Elizabeth

    11/6
    icon_biggrin.gif Annacia Moroccan Pilaf #321104 by mersaydees

    11/7
    icon_biggrin.gif awalde Chicken With Dates and Moroccan Spices #483812 by Annacia

    11/9
    icon_biggrin.gif Mia in Germany Citrus and Cinnamon Couscous #52428 by canarygirl
    icon_biggrin.gif Mia in Germany Moroccan-Spiced Lamb Burgers With Beet Salsa #305837 by Samantha in Ut
    icon_biggrin.gif Mia in Germany Moroccan Chicken Stew, Crock Pot #275573 by Annacia

    11/10
    icon_biggrin.gif Cookgirl Krachel- Moroccan Sweet Rolls With Anise and Sesame #491157 By Annacia
    icon_biggrin.gif duonyte Sweet Potato Soup With Harissa & Spinach #471383 by Bob Marshall

    11/16
    icon_biggrin.gif Annacia Spicy Moroccan Lentil Soup #361628 by La Dilettante

    11/23
    icon_biggrin.gif Annacia Tagine With Chicken and Quinces #437225 by awalde

    11/28
    icon_biggrin.gif Baby Kato Flavored Butter: Saffron and Cardamom Butter #489593

    12/1
    icon_biggrin.gif Annacia Golden Saffron and Cardamom Spiced Chicken & Rice Pilau #380409

    12/5
    icon_biggrin.gif elmotoo Harira (Beef and Chickpea Soup) #351856 by threeovens
    icon_biggrin.gif elmotoo Moroccan Casserole #346120 by hipbonez

    12/13
    icon_biggrin.gif Baby Kato Qishr - Yemeni Ginger Coffee #288851

    12/19
    icon_biggrin.gif Annacia Moroccan Carrot-Chickpea Salad #459138 by Ex-Pat Mama

    12/20
    Baby Kato Golden Saffron and Cardamom Spiced Chicken & Rice Pilau #380409 by BecR

    12/28
    icon_biggrin.gif Batata Slata -- Moroccan Potato Salad #139793 by Hajar Elizabeth
    icon_biggrin.gif Amalou (Almond Honey Butter) #354791 by threeovens
    icon_biggrin.gif Beef Marrakesh With Apricots and Lemon #447626 by Gourmand


    Last edited by Elmotoo on Thu Jan 17, 2013 8:11 am, edited 3 times in total
    Annacia
    Fri Nov 02, 2012 4:53 pm
    Forum Host
    YAY, we made it to Morocco!

    Tagging
    Moorish Moroccan Chicken Tagine #290607 by Clare 'E-Foodie' Jones

    icon_biggrin.gif
    Annacia
    Fri Nov 02, 2012 9:51 pm
    Forum Host
    I made
    Moorish Moroccan Chicken Tagine #290607 by Clare 'E-Foodie' Jones



    crummy kitchen light icon_evil.gif
    Elmotoo
    Sat Nov 03, 2012 2:28 pm
    Forum Host
    Annacia wrote:
    I made
    Moorish Moroccan Chicken Tagine #290607 by Clare 'E-Foodie' Jones



    crummy kitchen light icon_evil.gif

    oooooohhhhhh what a gorgeous photo!!
    Annacia
    Sat Nov 03, 2012 4:01 pm
    Forum Host
    Thanks hon.

    And there you see my tagine in use, I love it. icon_biggrin.gif
    Annacia
    Sun Nov 04, 2012 9:25 am
    Forum Host
    Tagging

    Hasa Al Hummus -- Moroccan Chickpea Soup #140868 by Hajar Elizabeth

    K, where is everyone icon_question.gif
    I'm feeling kind of lonely here.
    Elmotoo
    Sun Nov 04, 2012 6:52 pm
    Forum Host
    trying desperately to gather my thoughts.
    Annacia
    Sun Nov 04, 2012 7:09 pm
    Forum Host
    You have an excellent excuse hon. You've had just a bit on your plate of late.
    Annacia
    Tue Nov 06, 2012 2:18 pm
    Forum Host
    Hasa Al Hummus -- Moroccan Chickpea Soup #140868 by Hajar Elizabeth

    Has been made and enjoyed icon_biggrin.gif

    Annacia
    Tue Nov 06, 2012 2:58 pm
    Forum Host
    Tagging

    Moroccan Pilaf #321104 by mersaydees
    UmmBinat
    Tue Nov 06, 2012 4:48 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Not our favorite type of food.
    awalde
    Wed Nov 07, 2012 12:49 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    UmmBinat wrote:
    Not our favorite type of food.

    Hi Ummi, I'm really glad see you again! I hope you all are well!
    Thanks for dropping in even if this is not yor favorite food!
    awalde
    Wed Nov 07, 2012 12:52 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Annacia wrote:
    I made
    Moorish Moroccan Chicken Tagine #290607 by Clare 'E-Foodie' Jones



    crummy kitchen light icon_evil.gif

    I love you photo with the tagine.
    This made me hungry of Maroccan food.

    About 8 years ago we spent 2 weeks travelling there. We had woonderful dishes!
    Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next Page >> Stop sending e-mails when someone replies
    Add this to My Favorite Topics
    Alert us of inappropriate posts

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Ideas from Food.com

    Powered by phpBB 2.0.1 © 2002 phpBB Group

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites