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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / GF Baking - Share Tips, Recipes, Experience!
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    GF Baking - Share Tips, Recipes, Experience!

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    Donna M.
    Fri Oct 26, 2012 12:13 pm
    Forum Host
    You guys, check your health food store bulk bins for the xanthan gum. I haven't looked or priced it there, but I have found that other specialty flour items are much cheaper when purchased this way. Bob's Red Mill is always very pricey in the grocery stores.
    Bonnie G #2
    Fri Oct 26, 2012 12:15 pm
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    I don't understand what the xanthum gum does? Is it a sugar, yeast, what?
    pammyowl
    Fri Oct 26, 2012 1:25 pm
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    duonyte wrote:
    JoeV, your xanthan gum is a lot cheaper than what I saw here. I don't really bake GF regularly so have not invested in it, I seem to remember something around 16-17 dollars for a small package at the grocery store, perhaps I need to check some other stores.


    Actually, I googled it, and you can use cornstarch but you only use half as much as the tapioca starch. I live out in the middle of nowhere, but the next time I am at the store, I'll look for it! Thanks icon_smile.gif
    Mia in Germany
    Fri Oct 26, 2012 1:30 pm
    Forum Host
    Bonnie G #2 wrote:
    I don't understand what the xanthum gum does? Is it a sugar, yeast, what?


    It's a thickening agent. It's to imitate the gluten which actually is the glue in normal flour. Gluten free flours don't have any real glue, so baked items can get pretty crumbly or - worst case - turn out like a brick. With xanthan you get gluten free baked items more elastic, less crumbly, and they rise better and don't become brick stones icon_lol.gif
    Chemically, xanthan is a polysaccharide, a kind of sugar that you get by fermenting sucrose or another sugar with a specific bacterium. You can use it like agar agar.
    duonyte
    Fri Oct 26, 2012 1:54 pm
    Forum Host
    Donna M. wrote:
    You guys, check your health food store bulk bins for the xanthan gum. I haven't looked or priced it there, but I have found that other specialty flour items are much cheaper when purchased this way. Bob's Red Mill is always very pricey in the grocery stores.


    My bulk food place does not carry it - has lots of other stuff but not that. Will need to check the health food stores.
    Bonnie G #2
    Fri Oct 26, 2012 4:14 pm
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    Mia in Germany wrote:
    Bonnie G #2 wrote:
    I don't understand what the xanthum gum does? Is it a sugar, yeast, what?


    It's a thickening agent. It's to imitate the gluten which actually is the glue in normal flour. Gluten free flours don't have any real glue, so baked items can get pretty crumbly or - worst case - turn out like a brick. With xanthan you get gluten free baked items more elastic, less crumbly, and they rise better and don't become brick stones icon_lol.gif
    Chemically, xanthan is a polysaccharide, a kind of sugar that you get by fermenting sucrose or another sugar with a specific bacterium. You can use it like agar agar.


    Wow that's interesting, now it's something I'm going to have to look for when I get home as my DS and his family will be spending Thanksgiving with us.
    Mia in Germany
    Fri Oct 26, 2012 4:19 pm
    Forum Host
    Bonnie G #2 wrote:
    Mia in Germany wrote:
    Bonnie G #2 wrote:
    I don't understand what the xanthum gum does? Is it a sugar, yeast, what?


    It's a thickening agent. It's to imitate the gluten which actually is the glue in normal flour. Gluten free flours don't have any real glue, so baked items can get pretty crumbly or - worst case - turn out like a brick. With xanthan you get gluten free baked items more elastic, less crumbly, and they rise better and don't become brick stones icon_lol.gif
    Chemically, xanthan is a polysaccharide, a kind of sugar that you get by fermenting sucrose or another sugar with a specific bacterium. You can use it like agar agar.


    Wow that's interesting, now it's something I'm going to have to look for when I get home as my DS and his family will be spending Thanksgiving with us.


    Good luck icon_biggrin.gif It's fun to experiment around icon_wink.gif
    Mia in Germany
    Fri Oct 26, 2012 4:21 pm
    Forum Host
    [quote="JoeV"]
    Mia in Germany wrote:
    JoeV wrote:
    Hi wave.gif
    Pammyowl made me aware of your post because I'm gluten free. I googled this recipe as it sounds interesting - thanks for bringing up this idea, I'll definitely try this bread. My first approach to gf bread years ago was an Irish soda bread made from rice flour - it turned out terrible icon_lol.gif I've been looking for an easy gluten free rice bread ever since but didn't find one that did the trick. This one looks like what I've been hunting all the time icon_biggrin.gif
    I'll add some xanthan, though, even though it seems to work without it.
    It's so sweet of you to make this for that old lady!
    Here are the quantities I used. This loaf was baked in a 8" x 4" x 2-1/2" dp. bread pan. The original recipe used half of these ingredients, so you may want to make a smaller loaf to try at first. Good luck, and I hope you enjoy it.

    2C Rice flour
    2-1/2t GF Baking powder (or make your own)
    1t Sea salt or table salt (I like sea salt for its flavor)
    2T Mixed Italian herbs (My addition)
    2T Dried vegetable flakes (My addition)
    3T Honey
    2 Large egg well beaten
    1C Milk (I used 2% as that's we drink)
    1/4C Vegetable oil (I have seen recipes using olive oil)

    Blend the dry stuff...blend the wet stuff...mix them together...pour into a greased pan and bake at 350F for 20-25 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean.

    (I'm sure you are used to doing the conversions.)

    P.S. As with all bread baking, you can experiment with adding things to the base recipe. Herbs, nuts, seeds, cracklings, meats and GF cheeses are just some ideas.


    Thanks so much for writing this down for me icon_biggrin.gif I'm going to make it first thing tomorrow morning! This amount fits exactly my smallest loaf pan, so I'll follow it to the letter.
    Galley Wench
    Fri Oct 26, 2012 4:27 pm
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    My son and granddaughter have been diagnosed with Celiac so he does all the baking. I've yet to find a GF that I liked . . . to much like cardboard, but guess if that's all I could have it would be WONDERFUL!
    Mia in Germany
    Fri Oct 26, 2012 4:43 pm
    Forum Host
    icon_lol.gif
    The problem is the comparing. People try to imitate the "real thing" instead of making the gluten free bread the real thing itself. I see it like Chinese and French cooking. Don't expect French food when you're eating Chinese, but that doesn't make either worse. They're both good on their own, just different. Eating gluten free is like just eating Chinese and avoiding French icon_wink.gif
    But I agree that many gluten free items don't turn out well - many remind me of the organic food cooking experiments that were popular in my area in the 1980s. Healthy and not edible icon_lol.gif
    Galley Wench
    Fri Oct 26, 2012 4:53 pm
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    My son has found some mixes on Amazon that he claims are very good. I'll have find out what they are!
    pammyowl
    Fri Oct 26, 2012 5:10 pm
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    I Have tried the all purpose GF flour from KAF. made pie crust and bread from it. t is good, not gritty at all like some other AP GF flours. I'd look in stores, as the shipping can be expensive icon_smile.gif
    Galley Wench
    Fri Oct 26, 2012 5:14 pm
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    Shipping is free on Amazon with orders of $25, on most items.
    pammyowl
    Fri Oct 26, 2012 5:19 pm
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    That is true,I was talking about the KAF website icon_smile.gif I looooove amazon! icon_lol.gif
    Galley Wench
    Fri Oct 26, 2012 5:21 pm
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    Pamela's is the mix brand that they like . . . http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=node%3D16310221&field-keywords=Pamela's&rh=n%3A16310101%2Cn%3A!16310211%2Cn%3A16310221%2Ck%3APamela's
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