Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Emergency Food/Supplies / Hurricane Sandy...Head's up for the east coast!
    Lost? Site Map

    Hurricane Sandy...Head's up for the east coast!

    UnknownChef86
    Thu Oct 25, 2012 5:59 pm
    Forum Host
    http://www.usatoday.com/story/weather/2012/10/24/jamaica-storm-hurricane-sandy/1653851/
    One forecast model shows the storm slamming into the Northeast next week
    by Doyle Rice
    * Hurricane Sandy's rampage through the Caribbean is only the beginning
    * Chances are increasing for a major storm impacting the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast, a forecast says
    * Sandy's first U.S. impacts will be along the east coast of Florida
    9:40AM EDT October 25. 2012 -

    Hurricane Sandy's rampage through the Caribbean today is only the beginning: Forecasters say the storm could morph into a monstrous nor'easter and slam the U.S. East Coast next week — or it could miss us entirely.

    If it hits the Northeast the day before Halloween, as one computer model shows, it would be a disastrous storm, bringing coastal flooding, drenching rainfall, high winds, downed trees, power outages, travel mayhem and even Appalachian snow, according to AccuWeather meteorologist Alex Sosnowski.

    Could that happen? Unfortunately, as of midday Wednesday, the "chances are increasing for a major storm impacting the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast," according to an online forecast report by meteorologist James Cisco of the Hydrometeorological Prediction Center.

    INTERACTIVE MAP:Track Hurricane Sandy
    PHOTOS: Sandy strikes

    Regardless of what happens next week, Sandy's first U.S. impacts will be along the East Coast of Florida this afternoon and evening, National Hurricane Center spokesman Dennis Feltgen says.

    Although the center of gigantic Sandy (even if downgraded to a tropical storm) will be between Cuba and the Bahamas, it will still affect Florida: Sandy will grow into a huge storm Thursday, Feltgen says, with tropical-storm-force winds extending as far as 220 miles from the eye.

    The National Hurricane Center has issued tropical storm warnings and watches for Florida's southeastern coast from the Volusia/Brevard County line south to the Upper Keys.

    The weather along waterlogged Florida's East Coast will be dismal today through Saturday as Sandy slogs north, bringing gusty winds and rain, huge waves and dangerous rip currents. South Florida has had one of its wettest years on record and could do without any additional rain from Sandy. Just since May 1, Miami has received more than 5 feet of rain, the National Weather Service reports.

    Where the storm goes after it moves past Florida Saturday is just a guess, Feltgen says. One computer model shows it curving out to sea, while another shows it hooking into the Northeast coast as a powerful nor'easter.

    Nor'easters are intense areas of low pressure that develop off the East Coast during late fall, winter and early spring. They are called "nor'easters" because they usually bring strong northeast winds over the East as they move north along the Atlantic Coast.

    By that point, Sandy would no longer be a tropical storm or hurricane, having transitioned to what meteorologists call an "extratropical" storm.

    Before it's done, Sandy is likely to produce total rainfall amounts of 6 to 12 inches across Jamaica, Haiti, the Dominican Republic and eastern Cuba, with isolated maximum amounts of 20 inches possible, according to meteorologist Steve Bowen of global reinsurance firm Aon Benfield. These rains may produce life-threatening flash floods and mudslides, especially in areas of mountainous terrain.

    Tropical storms and hurricanes this late in the season aren't actually all that unusual, Feltgen says. He says that, on average, there are about two named tropical storms or hurricanes each October. Additionally, each of the past three Novembers has seen at least one storm, meaning we're not out of the woods even after Sandy.

    Sandy is the 18th named tropical storm or hurricane of the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season, and Tropical Storm Tony, spinning harmlessly in the Atlantic, makes 19. An average season sees about 12 named storms and hurricanes.
    DEEP
    Sun Oct 28, 2012 2:15 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I certainly hope folks are paying very close attention as this storm plays out,UC. Even here in W. NC we are expecting anywhere from 2 to 8 inches of snow....temps only in the 20s and 30s.....winds from 25-35 mph with gusts to 60 mph. I really expect we will lose power at some point during this event. I have spent months "prepping" for emergencies, yet I am hopeful it doesn't happen, but am fully prepared if it does. These type storms are not rare here with the "eye" of the storm being so far away. Nor are they common. But every few years we are affected this way by really strong Nor'easters.....the winter blizzard of '93 being the greatest example. I feel totally prepared going into the next few days. For many, it is going to be much worse I'm afraid. Prepare NOW for whatever you can!
    kseiverd
    Sun Oct 28, 2012 4:36 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I'm pretty much right in the middle of NJ (N to S) and close to the Delaware river (short drive to Philly). No HIGH areas around me, but flooding isn't a big concern to me... except potential basement water?? Have all the "essentials"... toilet paper, coffee, cat food/litter. DID have a thought earlier today... was planning to pay a lot of normal bills within next few days. Did that TODAY, since I do it online. If power goes out, seriously doubt payees will be sympathetic toward late payments. Has been dreary/drizzly for past few hours. I have flashlights all over the house (with good batteries). Pulled ANCIENT corded phone outta hall closet. Have a full tank of gas... but that's more something I make sure to do when it snows.

    If power goes out, could still light gas burners on stove top manually. Wondering is a "modern" gas oven can be manually started... NOT that I'm planning on doing any BAKING!?!
    UnknownChef86
    Tue Oct 30, 2012 5:25 pm
    Forum Host
    DEEP wrote:
    I certainly hope folks are paying very close attention as this storm plays out,UC. Even here in W. NC we are expecting anywhere from 2 to 8 inches of snow....temps only in the 20s and 30s.....winds from 25-35 mph with gusts to 60 mph. I really expect we will lose power at some point during this event. I have spent months "prepping" for emergencies, yet I am hopeful it doesn't happen, but am fully prepared if it does. These type storms are not rare here with the "eye" of the storm being so far away. Nor are they common. But every few years we are affected this way by really strong Nor'easters.....the winter blizzard of '93 being the greatest example. I feel totally prepared going into the next few days. For many, it is going to be much worse I'm afraid. Prepare NOW for whatever you can!

    I can appreciate the "prepared but grateful if you don't need it" thought! Rather prepared and not need it, tho', than vice-versa.

    Praying all goes well for you and yours.
    UnknownChef86
    Tue Oct 30, 2012 5:28 pm
    Forum Host
    kseiverd wrote:
    I'm pretty much right in the middle of NJ (N to S) and close to the Delaware river (short drive to Philly). No HIGH areas around me, but flooding isn't a big concern to me... except potential basement water?? Have all the "essentials"... toilet paper, coffee, cat food/litter. DID have a thought earlier today... was planning to pay a lot of normal bills within next few days. Did that TODAY, since I do it online. If power goes out, seriously doubt payees will be sympathetic toward late payments. Has been dreary/drizzly for past few hours. I have flashlights all over the house (with good batteries). Pulled ANCIENT corded phone outta hall closet. Have a full tank of gas... but that's more something I make sure to do when it snows.

    If power goes out, could still light gas burners on stove top manually. Wondering is a "modern" gas oven can be manually started... NOT that I'm planning on doing any BAKING!?!

    Good idea re. the paying ahead of time...given the size of this storm, they may be understanding...but better that it's out of the way.

    I have an old, rotary phone we equipped with a "modern" jack...not sure where it is at the moment, but we usually have it on hand for those nasty storms that will take down the electrically dependent cordless phones. Funny (ie, ironic) how we bring out the "old" stuff because the new stuff isn't up to the task, isn't it? "New and improved" isn't, always...

    God bless and stay safe.
    Stop sending e-mails when someone replies
    Add this to My Favorite Topics
    Alert us of inappropriate posts

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Ideas from Food.com

    Powered by phpBB 2.0.1 © 2002 phpBB Group

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites