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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / Chestnut bread recipe
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    Chestnut bread recipe

    satimis
    Mon Oct 22, 2012 3:14 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Hi all,

    Can any folk point me links of chestnut bread recipe for bread machine using chestnut puree, not chestnut flour?

    Thanks

    B.R.
    satimis
    duonyte
    Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:58 am
    Forum Host
    I found this recipe which is not for a bread machine but which I think could be made in one, http://www.carina-forum.com/ricette/bread/bread/0000040_en.php

    I think this would make a small loaf.
    satimis
    Mon Oct 22, 2012 9:47 am
    Food.com Groupie
    duonyte wrote:
    I found this recipe which is not for a bread machine but which I think could be made in one, http://www.carina-forum.com/ricette/bread/bread/0000040_en.php

    I think this would make a small loaf.

    Hi,

    Thanks for your link.

    Ingredients:-

    75 g chestnut puree*
    225 g mineral water
    350 g wheat flour
    25 g rye flour
    1 tbsp beetroot molasses
    7 g oat malt
    6 g fresh yeast
    1,5 tsp salt
    Pinch of nutmeg (optional)
    1 tbsp vegetable oil
    50 ml dry black currants (cranberries, raisins, cherries)
    50 ml black currant liquor (orange juice, water, rum, any alcohol of your choice)

    Fresh Yeast Conversion
    http://makebread.com.au/fresh-yeast-conversion/
    The rule of thumb is dividing or multiplying by 3:

    I don't have following ingredients. What will be their substitution?

    - rye flour
    How to substitude it?

    - oat malt
    How to substitute it?

    - beetroot molasses
    Can it be substituted with honey or maple syrup or syrup ?

    Why dry black currants is measured in volume?

    Following steps will be performed manually as instructed.

    Soak the currants in the liquor for 1 hour (minimum)
    * for the chestnut pure cook the chestnuts in 150ml milk and blend into a puree
    Rub the yeast into the molasses and malt, stir in a bit of water and leave for 10 min
    Pour in the rest of the water and stir well

    Afterwards put all ingredients in the baking pan of the bread machine. Start "Basic Bread" cycle to make the bread which includes kneading.

    Comment and suggestion would be appreciated. TIA

    B.R.
    satimis
    duonyte
    Mon Oct 22, 2012 10:29 am
    Forum Host
    If you read towards the bottom of the recipe as posted, it says to use other flours for the rye flour if that is unavailable. I'd just omit the oat malt, I would not have it to use either. For the beetroot molasses, I would use honey myself, or some other syrupy sweetener.

    While I know weight is used far more frequently than volume measure in other countries, still, a lot of cooks still use volume measures. My own relatives don't even own a scale and everything is done with volume measure.
    satimis
    Tue Oct 23, 2012 8:25 am
    Food.com Groupie
    duonyte wrote:
    If you read towards the bottom of the recipe as posted, it says to use other flours for the rye flour if that is unavailable. I'd just omit the oat malt, I would not have it to use either. For the beetroot molasses, I would use honey myself, or some other syrupy sweetener.

    While I know weight is used far more frequently than volume measure in other countries, still, a lot of cooks still use volume measures. My own relatives don't even own a scale and everything is done with volume measure.

    Thanks for your advice. I'll come back to post the baking result here.

    Meanwhile I found following recipe for Chestnut Sponge Cake.

    Chinese-Style Chestnut Filled Cake
    http://www.food.com/recipe/chinese-style-chestnut-filled-cake-143218

    If I don't have potato masher what utensil shall I use?

    Are there other chestnut sponge cake recipe not using chestnut flour?
    duonyte
    Tue Oct 23, 2012 10:41 am
    Forum Host
    You need something like a potato masher or potato ricer to get a smooth consistency. Mahing with a fork is a possibility, I guess, but I think it will be hard to get a smooth consistency. That is a fairly large quantity of chestnuts. I don't know how available potato mashers are for you, here they are very common and cost just a few dollars. I suppose you could try using a blender. There is no gluten to toughen, but I would be concerned that it would be a finer consistency - a puree - rather than the somewhat rougher consistency that you get from mashing.
    satimis
    Tue Oct 23, 2012 12:20 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    duonyte wrote:
    You need something like a potato masher or potato ricer to get a smooth consistency. Mahing with a fork is a possibility, I guess, but I think it will be hard to get a smooth consistency. That is a fairly large quantity of chestnuts. I don't know how available potato mashers are for you, here they are very common and cost just a few dollars.

    My kitchen is now full of utensils, looking like for professional chef. OK, I'll get a potato masher.

    Quote:

    I suppose you could try using a blender. There is no gluten to toughen, but I would be concerned that it would be a finer consistency - a puree - rather than the somewhat rougher consistency that you get from mashing.

    Yes, I'll use blender preparing chestnut puree and for other mixing task.
    duonyte
    Tue Oct 23, 2012 3:15 pm
    Forum Host
    satimis
    Thu Oct 25, 2012 9:48 am
    Food.com Groupie
    satimis
    Sat Oct 27, 2012 6:39 am
    Food.com Groupie
    My first chestnut bread - fail to rise properly. A little bid dense.

    Modified recipe:

    Ingredients:-

    75 g chestnut puree*
    225 g mineral water (substituted with water for cooking chestnut,86g + tap water, 110g)
    400 g wheat flour (substituted with plain floor)
    25 g rye flour (substituted with plain floor)
    1 tbsp beetroot molasses (omitted)
    7 g oat malt (substituted with honey)
    6 g fresh yeast (substituted with 3g instant yeast)
    1 tsp salt
    Pinch of nutmeg (1/2 tsp ground nutmeg)
    1 tbsp vegetable oil
    50 ml dry black currants (50x1.57=78.5g)
    50 ml black currant liquor (substituted with Scotch Whisky)

    150 ml milk, full cream, for cooking chestnut


    Instruction
    ===========
    Following steps are performed manually:

    - Soak the black currants in Scotch Whisky for 1 hour (minimum)
    - * for the chestnut puree, cook the chestnuts with milk in pressure cooker at high pressure for 5 min and blend into a puree
    - Rub the yeast into honey, stir in a bit of water mixture and leave for 10 min. Pour in the rest of the water mixture and stir well

    Afterwards put all ingredients in the baking pan of the bread machine. Start "Basic Bread" cycle to bake the bread.
    Weight of bread selected 750g
    Crust selected medium

    kneading, 1st (slow) 3 min
    kneading, 2nd (fast) 31 min
    rise 1 - 26 min
    kneading, 3rd (fast) 15 sec
    rise 2 - 25 min
    kneading, 4th (fast) 15 sec
    rise 3 - 55 min
    Bake 50 min

    Any idea on adjusting ingredient quantity on 2nd round?

    tap water to reduced by 20g ?
    instant year to be increased to 6g ?
    drain currants after soaking in whisky?

    Thanks

    Photos:
    chestnut_bread_01
    http://ubuntuone.com/2C3RHmi38zGOTvtvIRlJhi

    chestnut_bread_02
    http://ubuntuone.com/1KGHHcQZpXh23GUB3Jn6hf

    B.R.
    satimis
    duonyte
    Sat Oct 27, 2012 2:28 pm
    Forum Host
    I would not reduce the water. Too little water will result in a dense loaf. A softer dough will rise more.

    Try making no more than one or two changes with your next loaf. Otherwise it's hard to know what made a difference.
    satimis
    Sun Oct 28, 2012 6:41 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Sorry I made a mistake previously.

    The dough was quite soft looking similar to mud lying flat in the baking pan, not like a ball. That is why I doubt water being excessive. I used "Gold Medal All Purpose Flour" baking the loaf.

    Gold Medal All Purpose Flour, Enriched Bleached Presifted
    http://www.wegmans.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10052&catalogId=10002&productId=370064

    Next loaf I'll use "Wessex Mill Strong White Bread Flour"

    Strong White Bread Flour 1.5kg
    http://www.wessexmill.co.uk/acatalog/Small_Bags.html

    I'll make following changes;
    1)
    350g wheat flour substituted with 350g "Strong White Bread Flour", changing back to quantity called by the original recipe

    2)
    50ml Orange juice instead of Scotch Whisky (I doubt the alcohol content killing the instant yeast)

    3)
    I won't rub the instant yeast in honey. Instead I'll add it to flour.

    4)
    I'll add the salt to cooking milk

    5)
    Drip the dry black currants after soaking in orange juice


    Revised recipe:
    ===============
    75 g chestnut puree*
    225 g mineral water (I'll get it in supermarket)
    350 g Strong White Bread Flour as called by the original recipe instead of 400 g
    25 g rye flour (substituted with Strong White Bread Flour)
    7 g honey
    3 g instant yeast
    1 tsp salt
    1/2 tsp ground nutmeg
    1 tbsp vegetable oil
    78.5g dry black currants
    50 ml orange juice

    150 ml milk, full cream, for cooking chestnut

    I'll retain the dripped orange juice first not adding to the baking pan. If discovering the dough being too dry/dense during kneading I'll add it to the baking pan gradually, not all in the same time.
    duonyte
    Sun Oct 28, 2012 10:49 am
    Forum Host
    Right, the whole wheat flour requires more water than the plain flour you used - so using bread flour or whole wheat will absorb more of the liquid. Holding back some of it is a good idea.

    Let us know how this goes - your experiments are always so interesting!
    satimis
    Wed Oct 31, 2012 1:11 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    New chestnut loaf

    Revised recipe:
    ===============
    75 g chestnut puree*
    225 g mineral water
    350 g Strong White Bread Flour
    25 g rye flour (substituted with Strong White Bread Flour)
    7 g honey
    8 g instant yeast
    1 tsp salt
    1 tbsp vegetable oil
    40 g dry black currants
    25 ml orange juice

    150 ml milk, full cream, for cooking chestnut


    Steps performed
    ===============
    - Soak the black currants in orange juice for 1 hour. Drip the currants and discard the residue orange juice. Mix the currants with a tablespoon of bread flour and put them in the dispenser.
    - * for the chestnut puree, cook the chestnuts with milk in pressure cooker at high pressure for 5 min and blend them into a puree

    Put all ingredients in the baking pan in following order:
    chestnut puree
    mineral water
    honey
    salt
    vegetable oil
    Strong White Bread Flour
    instant yeast (last, to be separated from the wet ingredients before kneading)

    Start "Basic Bread" cycle to bake the bread.
    Weight of bread selected 750g
    Crust selected medium


    The loaf baked seems quite successful. Please refer to;
    photo-01_chestnutbread.jpeg
    http://ubuntuone.com/51WfK5FhPfsbHpB7cIX8lB

    photo-02_chestnutbread.jpeg
    http://ubuntuone.com/11TrhR3oSz3zPZ84pfzVkG

    The dough looks sticky lying almost flat in the baking pan. The previous conversion of fresh yeast to instant yeast was wrong because 1 tsp instant yeast weighs 5g. 3g was not sufficient. So I increase the yeast to 8g.

    The chestnut bread is quite soft but without chestnut taste. It tastes like plain white bread except being brown in colour. However the preparation work was increased. I'm not very interested on chestnut bread.

    Furthermore if to increase hole size(bigger holes) in the bread texture whether adding more intant yeast? Say 2g making totally 10g?

    B.R.
    satimis
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