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    Tarte al d'jote/bétchèye

    Tea Girl
    Sat Oct 06, 2012 7:06 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    My husband and I were recently in Nivelles, Belgium and we had the local specialty, tarte al d'jote. I am not sure we would have tried it without the others in our group who insisted it was wonderful because it does really stink, my husband had asked what the bad smell was before the thing arrived and only realised it was the food when it was sat in front of us. icon_lol.gif

    Anyway, my husband liked it so much that he would like to be able to make it himself. The problem is finding the cheese for it. All the recipes I find call for bétchèye or boulette de Nivelles (which I have the impression that is a type of bétchèye). Is there a substitute or a more common name or specific type that bétchèye goes under that I could find?
    Molly53
    Wed Oct 10, 2012 5:47 pm
    Forum Host
    My good European friend suggests Limburger, TeaGirl.
    Tea Girl
    Wed Oct 10, 2012 5:52 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Molly53 wrote:
    My good European friend suggests Limburger, TeaGirl.


    Well, that would account for the smell, and I know the bigger supermarket has that so I will give that a try. Thanks!
    Koechin (Chef)
    Mon Oct 15, 2012 3:38 pm
    Forum Host
    That's a funny story. Asking about the bad smell and the finding it's the food you. ordred. I remember my father enjoying his Limburger on rye bread with a beer and radish salad on the side. (those white bavarian Radishes). Wow what a smell of stinky feet. icon_biggrin.gif
    Do any of oiu know of or remeber Harzer Käse? My mother would make it and we would eat it on rye bread with Schmalz and the the ripe,runny Harzer. Not quite as bad,but close to Limburger.What memories.wave.gif
    Tea Girl
    Mon Oct 15, 2012 3:50 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Koechin (Chef) wrote:
    That's a funny story. Asking about the bad smell and the finding it's the food you. ordred. I remember my father enjoying his Limburger on rye bread with a beer and radish salad on the side. (those white bavarian Radishes). Wow what a smell of stinky feet. icon_biggrin.gif
    Do any of oiu know of or remeber Harzer Käse? My mother would make it and we would eat it on rye bread with Schmalz and the the ripe,runny Harzer. Not quite as bad,but close to Limburger.What memories.wave.gif


    It was extremely stinky, we were in a church hall and we could smell at the other end of the hall.

    I think I know Harzer Käse. Is it what you make Handkäs' mit Musik with? My DH makes it sometimes. It is stinky but the strenght of the smell is nowhere as bad.

    This tarte smelt stronger than Limburger, but I think maybe it was hot, I don't recall ever having the idea to cook with Limburger, more as something to have on a cold sandwich or on crackers. I have impression that in a couple weekend when we try that we will upset the neighbours. LOL
    Koechin (Chef)
    Mon Oct 15, 2012 3:58 pm
    Forum Host
    Your story is getting even funnier now.
    Be sure when you make it to keep doors and windows closed, or the neighbors might think someone died at your house and call police. LOL
    And yes I remember my mother making those little patty cakes of cheese and then wait until they turned the color of honey all the way through. No white could be left on the inside.What kind of cheese was used to start with? Do you know??? rotfl.gif
    Tea Girl
    Mon Oct 15, 2012 4:07 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Koechin (Chef) wrote:
    Your story is getting even funnier now.
    Be sure when you make it to keep doors and windows closed, or the neighbors might think someone died at your house and call police. LOL
    And yes I remember my mother making those little patty cakes of cheese and then wait until they turned the color of honey all the way through. No white could be left on the inside.What kind of cheese was used to start with? Do you know??? rotfl.gif


    Just asked DH and he said it was Harzer Käse, he always just used this cheap one from REWE.

    Not sure I have ever seen in the US. Well, ja! brand certainly not, but I am not sure if I ever saw it in general. icon_biggrin.gif
    Koechin (Chef)
    Mon Oct 15, 2012 4:22 pm
    Forum Host
    I was wondering when my mother made her own, what kind of cheese was used to star with? Quark???
    Tea Girl
    Mon Oct 15, 2012 4:28 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Koechin (Chef) wrote:
    I was wondering when my mother made her own, what kind of cheese was used to star with? Quark???


    It looks like, it calls for Magerquark, which I don't think I have ever seen in the US either.

    http://www.dicke-deutsche.de/2007/12/rezept-harzer-roller-selbermachen/
    Koechin (Chef)
    Mon Oct 15, 2012 4:31 pm
    Forum Host
    It can be ordered from some German Specialty store, but is very expensive. There are some recipes on this site to make your own.
    There is no way to make a German Käse Kuchen without it. icon_sad.gif
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