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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / Chicago Deep dish Pizza
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    Chicago Deep dish Pizza

    pathill
    Sat Sep 29, 2012 7:34 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I am having trouble when I make this pizza with a lot of excess liquid at the bottom of the pan when I cut into the pizza. I am using a springform pan, Dough, cheese, meat, sauce then 1/4 cup olive oil and parmesan on top. It looks great but when I cut my first piece there is a lot of water that seeps out??????? I don't know why? Any ideas>
    duonyte
    Sat Sep 29, 2012 9:20 am
    Forum Host
    Your sauce may be a bit too watery. That seems like a lot of olive oil on top - check out these recipes and see whether they might not give you some hints.

    Chicago Style Deep-Dish Pizza
    Uno Chicago Grill Deep Dish Pizza (Copy)
    Chicago Deep-Dish Pizza
    Chocolatl
    Sun Sep 30, 2012 11:22 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I grew up in Chicago, and I've never heard of putting oil on the top, ever.

    What recipe have you been using?
    pathill
    Mon Oct 01, 2012 2:03 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Thanks for your help! Checked out the recipes and maybe the 1/4 cup of olive oil on the top is the problem! I will also try a commercial sauce instead of my own. I cooked it down for 25 minutes, seemed thick but maybe it broke down.
    I got this recipe from a video blog that used cornmeal and semolina flour in the crust which was quite good! Thanks again!
    pathill
    Mon Oct 01, 2012 2:36 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    It was a video blog but can't find it now! I think your right about the oil on top it may be stopping the steam from escaping from the pizza and causing it to form inside the pizza! I will leave it off and see! Thanks!
    duonyte
    Mon Oct 01, 2012 3:42 pm
    Forum Host
    I can see drizzling a little bit on, but 1/4 cup seems like a lot. Good luck.
    JoeV
    Mon Oct 01, 2012 11:30 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    1/4 cup of olive oil is what's used in making a batch of olive oil pizza dough.

    Pizza or spaghetti sauce usually cooks for 4-6 hours. The longer you simmer it, the more water steams off. At 4 hours I take a tablespoon of sauce and pour it onto a white saucer to see how much water remains in the sauce. You will see a thin, pink colored liquid surrounding the sauce and seeping onto the plate. I simmer my sauce until that red line (the water) is less than 1/8" surrounding the sauce.
    Chocolatl
    Wed Oct 03, 2012 12:08 am
    Food.com Groupie
    JoeV wrote:
    1/4 cup of olive oil is what's used in making a batch of olive oil pizza dough.

    Pizza or spaghetti sauce usually cooks for 4-6 hours. The longer you simmer it, the more water steams off. At 4 hours I take a tablespoon of sauce and pour it onto a white saucer to see how much water remains in the sauce. You will see a thin, pink colored liquid surrounding the sauce and seeping onto the plate. I simmer my sauce until that red line (the water) is less than 1/8" surrounding the sauce.


    Chicago Deep Dish Pizza doesn't use regular pizza dough. It uses a special dough that contains cornmeal.

    Some pizza sauce is long-cooking, some quick cooking. Chicago Deep Dish Pizza uses a chunky marinara sauce.
    duonyte
    Wed Oct 03, 2012 11:34 am
    Forum Host
    pathill wrote:
    It was a video blog but can't find it now! I think your right about the oil on top it may be stopping the steam from escaping from the pizza and causing it to form inside the pizza! I will leave it off and see! Thanks!


    Let us know what happens when you have a chance to try it again. I have found that sometimes the videos don't match the recipes they publish that supposedly go with the videos.
    Riverside Len
    Fri Oct 05, 2012 10:15 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Real deep dish pizza has a special place in my heart. You might be surprised to know that not too many pizza restaurants in Chicago do a good job of it and most do not even offer it which might explain why most Chicagoans eat thin crust pizza. But I am also very passionate about thin crust pizza.

    First, I agree with those who say not to put olive oil on the topping. A properly made pan pizza dough is short and already has a healthy dose of olive oil in it. Your sauce might be too watery and/or you may be using too much sauce. Too much sauce is a common problem in many homemade pizzas.

    Traditional Chicago Deep Dish pizza uses canned tomatoes for the sauce. You drain them and then squeeze them over a colander to remove the juice and crush them. It is not cooked. I am of the opinion that you can use whatever kind of sauce you prefer, it just won't be traditional. But again, just don't overdo it.

    I posted a few photos a deep dish pizza a while back, if you are interested.

    http://www.food.com/bb/viewtopic.zsp?t=369792
    Red Apple Guy
    Sat Oct 06, 2012 1:57 pm
    Forum Host
    Great tutorial! I' must try that sometime.

    Your comment about using canned tomatoes with the water pressed out is a good one. I often use crushed italian tomatoes (shake the can to pick the least watery one) and drain through a sieve. The tomatoes are already cooked and will be again in the oven. It makes a very tasty sauce.

    Red
    Riverside Len
    Sat Oct 06, 2012 3:27 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Thanks Red. I think the extended baking time plus the fact the sauce is at the top of pizza is what makes the canned tomatoes work in a deep dish pizza.
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