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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / About sugar substituted with syrup
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    About sugar substituted with syrup

    satimis
    Thu Oct 04, 2012 9:27 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Hi all,

    I have some stock of golden syrup, containing 77.4 g sugar per 100g of syrup. I want to comsume it. Please advise;

    1)
    sponge cake
    If the recipe calls for 100 g granulated sugar how many gram of syrup shall I use for its substitution?

    2)
    Bread
    If the recipe calls for 100 g granulated sugar how many gram of syrup shall I use for its substitution?

    TIA

    B.R.
    satimis
    duonyte
    Thu Oct 04, 2012 10:26 am
    Forum Host
    It isn't a straightforward substitution and is generally not recommended (replacing dry sugar with a liquid sweetener), because you also have to allow for the liquid that a liquid sweetener adds.

    I think golden syrup is similar to honey. When using a cup of honey (240ml), you would have to reduce other liquid in a recipe by 1/4 cup (60 ml) .

    A cup of sugar is about 200 grams. One cup of honey will substitute for 1 1/4 cup of sugar (250 grams) plus 1/4 cup liquid.

    So for 100 grams of sugar, you would use something like 90 ml of golden syrup and reduce liquid by 2 tbl. And results are not guaranteed.

    I would not recommend substituting in the sponge cake recipe - the egg whites and sugar are needed to create the structure of the cake, I doubt that it would work with the golden syrup.

    With breads, it's a lot easier. I'd use perhaps 1/3 cup - about 80 ml and then adjust liquid and flour as necessary. I routinely use whatever sweetner I have handy when making yeast breads. With quick breads, the adjustment is trickier, as with any cake.
    satimis
    Fri Oct 05, 2012 2:13 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Hi duonyte,

    Thanks for your advice.

    I have about 2 litre stock of syrup (maple + golden) purchased previously for baking Banana Tea Bread. It is a nice and tasty bread/cake but too sweet and oily (syrup and butter). I already stopped baking this bread worrying getting weight and increase of waist measurement. My BMI (Body mass index) indicates I'm over-weight. Although it is slight over-weight I must keep watching my daily foods. Exercise doesn't help much disregarding visiting gym 3 days/week doing weight training.

    I expect to consume the stock of syrup before expiry. I can add maple syrup to plain yoghurt for topping sponge cake. It only consumes a small amount of syrup. Whipping cream plus syrup is better for topping but large consumption of the former won't be good to health.

    That is the present situation.
    duonyte
    Fri Oct 05, 2012 12:06 pm
    Forum Host
    Ah, yes, those baked goods can do bad things to the waistline. I suspect that the golden syrup may have a longer shelf life than indicated - especially if you have space to keep some of it in the refrigerator. 2 liters is a lot - I've never seen large containers of it here, probably 400 ml at best.
    satimis
    Fri Oct 05, 2012 12:40 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    duonyte wrote:
    2 liters is a lot - I've never seen large containers of it here, probably 400 ml at best.

    Sorry my mistake. It should be 2kgs in several cans and plastic containers.


    Last edited by satimis on Fri Oct 05, 2012 12:41 pm, edited 1 time in total
    satimis
    Fri Oct 05, 2012 12:40 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    duonyte wrote:
    2 liters is a lot - I've never seen large containers of it here, probably 400 ml at best.

    Sorry my mistake. It should 2kgs in several cans and plastic containers.
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