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    Apples! German Recipes!

    Go to page << Previous Page  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next Page >>
    pammyowl
    Tue Sep 04, 2012 2:46 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I found this online. I just copied and pasted, so the directions are a bit odd, I;ll have to fix that, but it looks delirious!

    APPLES IN STEWED CHERRIES&dagger; (ÄPFEL IN KIRSCHENKOMPOTT
    Mia in Germany
    Tue Sep 04, 2012 2:49 am
    Forum Host
    Oh, yum! I know that! It's delicious. Haven't had it in ages.
    pammyowl
    Tue Sep 04, 2012 2:54 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Any tips for me to correct the directions?
    Mia in Germany
    Tue Sep 04, 2012 2:59 am
    Forum Host
    Actually I find them quite clear and easy to follow.
    pammyowl
    Tue Sep 04, 2012 3:00 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Mia in Germany
    Wed Sep 05, 2012 5:21 am
    Forum Host
    This is what I got from a health food magazine yesterday:

    Flame Tart With Apples (Flammkuchen Mit Apfel) #486354
    Mia in Germany
    Wed Sep 05, 2012 5:24 am
    Forum Host


    Yum, I like that red cabbage icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif
    A friend of mine made this pork and apples with apple butter and beet molasses instead of maple, that's pretty good, too. Typical for our region.
    pammyowl
    Wed Sep 05, 2012 5:31 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Well, I have lots of beet molasses, don't I icon_lol.gif I'll try it!
    Mia in Germany
    Wed Sep 05, 2012 5:36 am
    Forum Host
    pammyowl wrote:
    Well, I have lots of beet molasses, don't I icon_lol.gif I'll try it!


    rotfl.gif
    Koechin (Chef)
    Wed Sep 05, 2012 11:07 am
    Forum Host
    Never heard of Beet Molasses. Are those Sugar Beets? I now remember, that sugar in Germany was made with sugar beets and not sugar cane as primarily used in the US. By the way they act completely different in baking. You get different results if using beet versus cane. wave.gif
    Mia in Germany
    Wed Sep 05, 2012 1:12 pm
    Forum Host
    Koechin (Chef) wrote:
    Never heard of Beet Molasses. Are those Sugar Beets? I now remember, that sugar in Germany was made with sugar beets and not sugar cane as primarily used in the US. By the way they act completely different in baking. You get different results if using beet versus cane. wave.gif


    Really? Different how? Usually I prefer baking with brown cane sugar instead of white beet sugar.
    The beet molasses is Ruebenkraut or Zuckerruebensirup.

    Koechin (Chef)
    Wed Sep 05, 2012 2:19 pm
    Forum Host
    I was watching a program by proffesional bakers about this issue. They had bought 500lb. of sugar and when things were not as usual they discovered, that it was Beet Sugar.They had to through everything away1
    I wish I could remember it all, but they advised to make sure to check your sugar packages to assure it was Cane Sugar. They said that the texture of the cakes and frostings was different. That's because beet sugar is not as sweet.
    I am sure if you Google Cane versus Beet Sugar you can find the information.
    Koechin (Chef)
    Wed Sep 05, 2012 2:32 pm
    Forum Host
    How Cane Sugar is Better




    Not all sugars are created equal.

    Lots of us have been brought up thinking that all sugars are—well—pretty much the same, and that the kind of sugar we use won’t make much difference. Even today, most people don’t know that some grocery stores carry two different kinds of sugar: cane sugar and beet sugar. Pure Cane Sugar, the kind C&H uses exclusively, is refined from sugarcane plants. The first cultivated sugar crop, sugarcane is grown above ground, nurtured in fresh tropical breezes under warm sunshine. Beet sugar, found in some store brands and in other makers that often don’t specify the source, is extracted from beets grown underground as a root crop.

    How cane sugar is different.
    Cane sugar contains trace minerals that are different from those in beet sugar, and it’s these minerals that many experts say make cane sugar preferable to use. As professional bakers have long noticed, cane sugar has a low melting-point, absorbs fewer extraneous and undesirable odors, blends easily and is less likely to foam up. And that can be very important when you’re caramelizing a syrup, making a delicate glaze, baking a delicious meringue, or simmering your family’s favorite jam recipe.

    Some brown sugars aren’t brown
    all the way through.
    What beet sugar makers call "brown sugar" starts out as white sugar crystals which are then sprayed with a brown coating. Often the center of the crystal remains white and the brown molasses coating can be rubbed off in your hands. Not exactly what you want when you go to the effort of baking something fresh from scratch.

    On the other hand, C&H Pure Cane Brown Sugar is naturally brown through and through. Brown cane sugar is a natural combination of sugar and molasses, refined without any added colorings, flavorings or coatings. Formed using the traditional method of crystallization, each C&H brown sugar crystal is brown all the way through. C&H brown sugar contains its own natural molasses that impart a rich, sweet, natural flavor and a consistent quality you can rely on even when it melts.

    Take the advice of the experts -
    use pure cane.
    Marion Cunningham, author of the Fannie Farmer Cookbook and a leading baking expert, says that beet sugar can cause problems with many recipes. "It matters in recipes for baked goods like angel food cake. It just isn’t right with beet sugar." And confectioner Joseph Schmidt, renown for his chocolate truffles and other candy, declares "I always order C&H Cane Sugar… It seems to be cleaner."

    The San Francisco Chronicle conducted a blind taste test, testing cane sugar vs. beet and consistently found the foods made with cane sugar were preferable.

    If it doesn’t say "Pure Cane Sugar,"
    it’s probably not.
    Labeling law doesn’t require a cane or beet designation and many refiners avoid labeling their products. If it doesn’t say "Pure Cane Sugar," it’s probably not. To be sure you get pure cane sugar, just buy any C&H branded Sugar. C&H has always been (and will always be) 100% pure cane sugar. And it says so on every package.
    pammyowl
    Wed Sep 05, 2012 2:33 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Well, that is a revelation! I seriously did not realize there was such a marked difference. Interesting to know that beet sugar burns while cane caramelizes.I'm embarrassed, I should have known that. A lower melting point and better blending. Curiouser and curiouser.........
    I have trouble with raw sugar, I'll have to investigate.

    Thanks for the information, koechin! icon_smile.gif icon_smile.gif
    pammyowl
    Wed Sep 05, 2012 2:47 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Koechin (Chef) wrote:
    How Cane Sugar is Better




    Not all sugars are created equal.

    Lots of us have been brought up thinking that all sugars are—well—pretty much the same, and that the kind of sugar we use won’t make much difference. Even today, most people don’t know that some grocery stores carry two different kinds of sugar: cane sugar and beet sugar. Pure Cane Sugar, the kind C&H uses exclusively, is refined from sugarcane plants. The first cultivated sugar crop, sugarcane is grown above ground, nurtured in fresh tropical breezes under warm sunshine. Beet sugar, found in some store brands and in other makers that often don’t specify the source, is extracted from beets grown underground as a root crop.

    How cane sugar is different.
    Cane sugar contains trace minerals that are different from those in beet sugar, and it’s these minerals that many experts say make cane sugar preferable to use. As professional bakers have long noticed, cane sugar has a low melting-point, absorbs fewer extraneous and undesirable odors, blends easily and is less likely to foam up. And that can be very important when you’re caramelizing a syrup, making a delicate glaze, baking a delicious meringue, or simmering your family’s favorite jam recipe.

    Some brown sugars aren’t brown
    all the way through.
    What beet sugar makers call "brown sugar" starts out as white sugar crystals which are then sprayed with a brown coating. Often the center of the crystal remains white and the brown molasses coating can be rubbed off in your hands. Not exactly what you want when you go to the effort of baking something fresh from scratch.

    On the other hand, C&H Pure Cane Brown Sugar is naturally brown through and through. Brown cane sugar is a natural combination of sugar and molasses, refined without any added colorings, flavorings or coatings. Formed using the traditional method of crystallization, each C&H brown sugar crystal is brown all the way through. C&H brown sugar contains its own natural molasses that impart a rich, sweet, natural flavor and a consistent quality you can rely on even when it melts.

    Take the advice of the experts -
    use pure cane.
    Marion Cunningham, author of the Fannie Farmer Cookbook and a leading baking expert, says that beet sugar can cause problems with many recipes. "It matters in recipes for baked goods like angel food cake. It just isn’t right with beet sugar." And confectioner Joseph Schmidt, renown for his chocolate truffles and other candy, declares "I always order C&H Cane Sugar… It seems to be cleaner."

    The San Francisco Chronicle conducted a blind taste test, testing cane sugar vs. beet and consistently found the foods made with cane sugar were preferable.

    If it doesn’t say "Pure Cane Sugar,"
    it’s probably not.
    Labeling law doesn’t require a cane or beet designation and many refiners avoid labeling their products. If it doesn’t say "Pure Cane Sugar," it’s probably not. To be sure you get pure cane sugar, just buy any C&H branded Sugar. C&H has always been (and will always be) 100% pure cane sugar. And it says so on every package.


    I was posting at the same time as you, koechin, sorry about that! I am assuming Mia is talking about Turbinado sugar when she says brown Not sure, though.
    I thought all brown sugars, C & H or store brands were white sugar coated with molasses. So you are saying that some are coated and some are naturally brown?
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