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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Holidays & Entertaining / Thanksgiving Epic Fails
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    Thanksgiving Epic Fails

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    noah0912
    Fri Sep 21, 2012 10:45 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    icon_redface.gif my mom and i was making turkry for thanksgiving and i was helping to clean out the turky and my mom forgot to get all the stuff out of the turky and i did not know there was stuff in there and when it came out i pork it and started to cut it and the stuff came on the knife and i started turn red in the face really bad
    farmchick #2
    Fri Sep 21, 2012 7:07 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    I have never had a problem as an adult, but when I was 10, I loved to make the scalloped corn...and convinced my mom that I would do this because with all the family coming in about an hour, Mom and Dad where having problems in the barn. Everything was laid out and all I had to do was put it together. I had done this often before. Somehow, I forgot the corn. I am not sure how you forget the main ingredient, but I did. Mom came in and had just enough time to clean up...and as people came in the door she saw corn on the counter. ..and looked in the stove to see a very thin corn dish to serve 15 people. Now, we would have had enough other foods, but to show what a great cook my mom is, she fixed it, and it was great. I am a bit past 40, and people still remember to tease.
    v92
    Tue Sep 25, 2012 12:02 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    My dear grandparents, God love them, have pledged their loyalty to this HUGE black fallout shelter of a slow cooker. They use it every year for the turkey to save room in the oven. It usually results in a bird implosion. When they finally emerge from the sensory deprivation chamber they aren’t very pretty and are always a tad wet but edible. One year they decided that a whole turkey just was too much food and so they decided to buy the now infamous turkey loaf. After cooking in the poor, pale, sickly looking loaf for hours we finally scooped the contents out and plopped it on the platter and for the first time got a good look at the... loaf. Slimy is the best word I can use. Picture a six inch round sausage. It had some sort of film over it to keep it together which it did not and as I said before it was almost white. There was even an odor to it. It looked more like tofu than real meat. Actually thinking back maybe that’s what it was. It was hard to see an animal in that… thing. R. L. Stein would have enjoyed the inspiration. icon_wink.gif Thank goodness there was a brown sugar ham as well so we weren't eating cereal for Thanksgiving but they still get grief from the Year of the Loaf. icon_razz.gif
    Liza at Food.com
    Tue Sep 25, 2012 1:09 pm
    Food.com Staff
    Ha, great stories! Best part of all these stories is that the family members rib each other over them for years after...that's what family is for!
    KelliSuzi
    Thu Sep 27, 2012 8:49 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    When I was a kid, I went to my friend's house on the Wed. before Thanksgiving. We were sitting at the kitchen bar eating cookies and her mom was cleaning the kitchen and preparing the turkey. She had a sink full of dirty water from mopping the floor, and the turkey on the counter. She went to get a pan from behind the turkey, and there it went... sliding right into the dirty water in the sink. LOLOL My friend and I just about fell on the floor laughing because her mom was trying to pull an oiled 18 lb. turkey out of the sink. It seemed to take forever. I still get a giggle laughing about that memory. I can see it all play out just like it was yesterday.
    threeovens
    Sun Sep 30, 2012 8:36 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Thanksgiving falls smack dab in the middle od the US Postal Services busy season. Both my husband and I work for USPS, and back when the economy was better, we had tons of overtime. We lived 32 miles away from our sorting plant and they were in the midst of building an HOV lane on the Long Island Expressway, which caused massive traffic tie-ups. Anyway, I always insist on cooking a big Thanksgiving, even if it is for the two of us. I started cooking on Tuesday, but had to turn off the turkey so we could go to work. Got home late, turned the oven back on. Got sleepy, turned it off so I wouldn't burn down the apartment building.

    At any rate, it took literally 4 days to cook that bird! I don't know if it was technically "safe" to eat, but it sure was delicious!
    threeovens
    Sun Sep 30, 2012 8:54 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Oh I am the Queen of Thanksgiving Epic Failures! It has been suggested in another forum that I not prepare Thanksgiving at all in the future.

    One year, I found a recipe in the local newspaper for a turnkey cooked in white wine. What a great idea! Not actually being a wine drinker at the time, I did buy a nice bottle of something dry and white. When I went to prepare the recipe, I found it only called for 1 cup of wine. Hmmm. What to do with the remainder? I know! I drank it. I swear I only sipped, but there did come a point in time when I got a trifle sleepy, shall we say? I went in the bedroom to rest a bit. Suddenly I smelled pies! Pies? Oh no! That means they are burning. I slipped on my slippers, stress the term slippers, and slid right on by the galley kitchen! I am told I landed with my head in the metal folding step stool (which for unknown reasons was propped up against the loveseat in the living room). All I know was that I was laying in bed with a tuna steak pressed against a huge lump on my forehead! It was the third piece of meat.

    DRINK THE WINE WITH DINNER, NOT WHILE PREPARING IT!

    BTW, the pies were fine and the turkey delicious and moist! I wound up in the emergency room with a concussion a couple of days later (the ultimate procrastinator or I didn't want to miss Thanksgiving).

    I still have a lump on my forehead, but it is only noticeable to moi.



    =======================

    Last Thanksgiving I promised everybody a homemade Green Bean Casserole. I have a great recipe for one that is made completely from scratch and my husband and I love it! Would you believe that no one in my family has every had Green Bean Casserole? And we are Americans, I swear! Everyone from my Mother, who loves her veggies, to my Sister, who doesn't cook or eat real food, to my darling Children, were excited to try there first Green Bean Casserole. After all, that is all we see on tv are commercials for Green Bean Casserole at Thanksgiving and Christmas time.

    Did I mention that my sweet Sister does not cook? This is the rule:

    DO NOT LET AMATEURS INTO THE KITCHEN WHEN PREPARING THANKSGIVING DINNER!

    No good can come of it. My Sister insisted that she wanted to help. Apparently she was hungry, and due to her eating issues HAD TO EAT RIGHT NOW! So she tried to help. All she accomplished was that she tried to rush me and I wound up cutting a nasty gash in my left index finger! It was sort of like a pocket in a stuffed pork chop. I grabbed a paper towel and wrapped my finger tightly to stop the spurting blood from getting on our sweet potatoes. It was really quite a bad cut and I was demoralized.

    But the worst thing is that I did not even start the Green Bean Casserole! Since it was made from scratch there was all sorts of slicing that needed to be done and I was just not up for it. I also no longer trusted amateurs to help me.

    So my family was a bit disappointed, but luckily they liked the other food I was able to prepare. I made the Green Bean Casserole a few days later for my husband and I. Perhaps that was the plan all along...

    Yes, I still have the scar and loss of feeling in that finger.
    threeovens
    Sun Sep 30, 2012 9:03 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    My first Thanksgiving that I cooked, was when I was in the Army, stationed at Fort Bliss in Texas. I went shopping and bought everything I would need. I could do this. I even remembered to thaw out the turkey in the refrigerator a few day in advance. Nothing to it.

    So Thanksgiving morning I got everything out, spread it on the counter, and realized...I had no idea how to cook any of it. Not a clue. I knew all the ingredients my Mom used, but had no idea how they went together!

    So, being a Private and poor, I trudged the 2 blocks to the nearest pay phone to call Mom. She was very helpful and gave me great directions. Unfortunately, I wanted to make a lot of stuff! It took 7 walks to the pay phone, 7 collect calls, but it got done and came out great!

    Now, I don't really need a recipe, but still use them to try new things. I also got a new and improved husband. He loves Thanksgiving. He's from Colombia and they don't have that there. He doesn't think they even have turkey icon_eek.gif
    threeovens
    Sun Sep 30, 2012 9:14 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Last Thanksgiving I went out and bought some nice hand towels for the bathroom. Toward the end of the night I noticed my nephew come out of the bathroom wiping his hands on his pants. I questioned him and he stated that he didn't want to dirty up my nice towels! icon_rolleyes.gif I went in to check, and sure enough, no one used my towels. I also had a basket with a stack of about 20 hand towels in it. Everyone could have had their own! icon_eek.gif

    I also folded some cloth napkins and they were a big topic of conversation. My daughter wanted a napkin. I told her to use the cloth one. She didn't want to get it dirty. I said that is why I bought white and have a washer and dryer. Go ahead, get it dirty. When cleaning up, only half were used. The other half were still in a fancy design I folded. Oh brother! I guess if they wouldn't wipe their mouths on a napkins, they certainly wouldn't dry their hands on a hand towel!

    If they come this year, I may not provide silverwear... icon_twisted.gif
    I'mPat
    Sun Sep 30, 2012 9:26 pm
    Forum Host
    Some really great stories and I don't know what it is that makes us laugh at other peoples mistakes but I've certainly been having a good giggle. icon_lol.gif


    Pat
    RéeLani
    Mon Oct 01, 2012 12:24 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Love these posts! I've only cooked 2 Thanksgiving dinners, and they've gone just fine. I'll share a friend's story that makes me laugh each time I think of it.

    My friend had moved into a new, small, apartment but was still eager to cook Thanksgiving dinner for her family. All went well, but when the turkey came out of the oven (beautifully golden brown) there was nowhere to put the roasting pan; counter space was very limited in this small kitchen. The turkey went onto its platter, and she decided to put the roasting pan on the floor outside her aparment door where it would be out of the way. After dinner came time to wash dishes, and as that was going on someone asked where the turkey pan was. "Oh, it's out in the hall, I'll get it." She went to the hall and lifted the pan to reveal a pan-shaped melted area of carpet!!

    Lesson learned: Don't put a hot pan on cheap nylon carpet icon_smile.gif
    lauralie41
    Sat Oct 13, 2012 11:47 am
    Food.com Groupie
    [quote="Chef #1290317"]In 2001, my family thought we would change up our traditional "roasted" turkey tradition, and try deep frying. However, my grandfather apparently put the thermometer in the wrong part of the turkey, and by the time he took it out, it was only charred remains. icon_smile.gif
    We ended up dining on the shrimp cocktail someone had brought as an appetizer, and whatever we could dig out of the fridge.

    [/quote]

    Oh no, your poor turkey! It was neat that you all rallied together and put something together for dinner without the turkey. icon_smile.gif
    lauralie41
    Sat Oct 13, 2012 12:10 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    MrsBWilcox wrote:
    There's nothing like melted plastic (which is the bag MY giblets came in the first time I cooked a turkey) to enhance the taste of your overcooked turkey... icon_smile.gif I have learned since then to allow PLENTY of time to let the turkey thaw AND to check BOTH ENDS for surprises!! icon_biggrin.gif


    It's just to funny where they can hide things in a turkey and then we cant find it. icon_mad.gif icon_lol.gif
    lauralie41
    Sat Oct 13, 2012 12:15 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    noah0912 wrote:
    icon_redface.gif my mom and i was making turkry for thanksgiving and i was helping to clean out the turky and my mom forgot to get all the stuff out of the turky and i did not know there was stuff in there and when it came out i pork it and started to cut it and the stuff came on the knife and i started turn red in the face really bad


    Not getting the bag of "goodies" out of the turkey has happened to a lot of us. icon_smile.gif I bet you have made great turkey's ever since that happened.
    lauralie41
    Sat Oct 13, 2012 12:18 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    farmchick #2 wrote:
    I have never had a problem as an adult, but when I was 10, I loved to make the scalloped corn...and convinced my mom that I would do this because with all the family coming in about an hour, Mom and Dad where having problems in the barn. Everything was laid out and all I had to do was put it together. I had done this often before. Somehow, I forgot the corn. I am not sure how you forget the main ingredient, but I did. Mom came in and had just enough time to clean up...and as people came in the door she saw corn on the counter. ..and looked in the stove to see a very thin corn dish to serve 15 people. Now, we would have had enough other foods, but to show what a great cook my mom is, she fixed it, and it was great. I am a bit past 40, and people still remember to tease.


    Isnt it funny how family members remember all those moments and always willing to share the story with everyone? icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif
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