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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Kitchen Gadgets & Appliances / "vintage" kitchen tools?
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    "vintage" kitchen tools?

    Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next Page >>
    kseiverd
    Sun Jul 15, 2012 11:51 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Bought a Wearever, aluminum, orange/lemon/lime press at a yard sale yesterday... because it looked interesting/old, was CLEAN and only $1! Sits horizontal on counter on 4 "feet". Ya lift up handle, put in fruit and press down on handle. Has little insert that catches seeds and a spout on the side to pour off juice. Saw somebody trying to sell one on Ebay for something like $29 or $39?!?

    What "vintage" stuff to you have in your kitchen... not just as decor, but you actually use?
    duonyte
    Sun Jul 15, 2012 6:57 pm
    Forum Host
    I have a potato masher that I am sure I bought when I first moved to Chicago- gosh, over 30 years ago. It has a round head with square openings. I have tried to replace it but none of the new style ones work. I don't see this style any longer. It mashes potatoes better than other styles.
    kseiverd
    Sun Jul 15, 2012 10:37 pm
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    Saw somebody on a cooking show using potato mashed to break up ground beef while browning! Looked like a good trick, though wouldn't use metal masher in non-stick pan?!?
    katie in the UP
    Mon Jul 16, 2012 4:51 pm
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    I use to collect kitchen tools with the red wood handles....I have a few of them....but shame on me...they are put away somewhere....question is...where? rotfl.gif
    I'm not too sure how old they are....
    duonyte
    Tue Jul 17, 2012 11:48 am
    Forum Host
    kseiverd wrote:
    Saw somebody on a cooking show using potato mashed to break up ground beef while browning! Looked like a good trick, though wouldn't use metal masher in non-stick pan?!?


    I could see that working well. I usually just poke and prod with my spatula to break it all up.
    katie in the UP
    Wed Jul 18, 2012 4:36 am
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    duonyte wrote:
    kseiverd wrote:
    Saw somebody on a cooking show using potato mashed to break up ground beef while browning! Looked like a good trick, though wouldn't use metal masher in non-stick pan?!?


    I could see that working well. I usually just poke and prod with my spatula to break it all up.


    I have a thick plastic masher (usually use for strawberries) anyhow...I've thought about using it for ground beef....now I'm going to have to try it!!
    **Tinkerbell**
    Fri Jul 20, 2012 11:35 am
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    kseiverd wrote:
    Saw somebody on a cooking show using potato mashed to break up ground beef while browning! Looked like a good trick, though wouldn't use metal masher in non-stick pan?!?


    Me either! I've been using what we call a "meat masher" for about 10 years or so. It's actually called a Mix 'N Chop from Pampered Chef. Sells for $10 and is definitely worth it!
    I can break up ground meats into taco size bits with very little effort, even when the meat is still mostly frozen. You just push straight down on the meat, give a little turn, lift and repeat.
    This is my favorite non-electric kitchen tool.

    **Tinkerbell**
    Fri Jul 20, 2012 11:39 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Besides the La Cotta volcanic rock searing pan I just purchased on Ebay (and am still anxious to use for the first time), my oldest two gadgets would have to be my 1970's Mirro Cookie Press (photo demo here: http://www.food.com/bb/viewtopic.zsp?t=330463), and a Mickey Mouse waffle iron. Both items were inherited... okay... stolen, from my mom icon_wink.gif when my now 19 year old was a tot.

    Kerfuffle-Upon-Wincle
    Fri Jul 20, 2012 12:16 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I LOVE old things that have prior lives ~ I've used these for 48 years:

    Aunt Belle's Gilchrist #20 wooden handle ice cream scoop
    Aunt Belle's parfait glasses
    Aunt Faye's King Edward silver plate set by Holmes & Edwards ~ I've added LOTS more pieces from Ebay, and I use them daily!
    Grandmother's cast iron skillets (2)
    Grandmother's cast iron corn stick pans (3)
    Mother's red handle ice pick
    Mother's red handle small wire strainer ~ she used it to strain loose tea!
    Mother's 3-piece white Tupperware canisters: flour, sugar, 2-lb bag cornmeal
    Mother's Wear-ever dutch oven with steamer insert
    Mother's clear glass citrus juicer/reamer
    Mother's Moss Rose china

    And probably more that I can't think of just now ~ icon_razz.gif
    kseiverd
    Fri Jul 20, 2012 3:54 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Today bought a "vintage" Oster food/meat grinder. Blue front with "stars" on it... thinking 70's at latest. Bought it cuz it was relatively clean, ran pretty smoothly when plugged in, and CHEAP... $5. Have wanted to try grinding own meat for burgers and stuff. NOT wanting to invest any serious money in an appliance. Figure... if I like results, have room to stash it in my garage. If I don't like results... will re-donate to another thrift shop.
    **Tinkerbell**
    Fri Jul 20, 2012 8:15 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I love all the hand-me-down gadgets and tools you cherish, KUW! They mean so much and let's face it, they're usually better made than new generation stuff. icon_wink.gif
    **Tinkerbell**
    Fri Jul 20, 2012 8:19 pm
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    kseiverd wrote:
    Today bought a "vintage" Oster food/meat grinder. Blue front with "stars" on it... thinking 70's at latest. Bought it cuz it was relatively clean, ran pretty smoothly when plugged in, and CHEAP... $5. Have wanted to try grinding own meat for burgers and stuff. NOT wanting to invest any serious money in an appliance. Figure... if I like results, have room to stash it in my garage. If I don't like results... will re-donate to another thrift shop.


    I too would like an actual meat grinder. Specifically, the attachment to my KitchenAid stand mixer, but for the past few years have been grinding beef, turkey, and chicken in my food processor. It works great and I didn't have to invest in a new gadget to find space for. icon_smile.gif
    Chocolatl
    Sun Jul 22, 2012 12:57 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I used to have a REALLY old-fashioned meat grinder that was not only operated by hand, but had to be clamped to the edge of the table. It worked beautifully, but was just too much hassle to use.
    kseiverd
    Sun Jul 22, 2012 10:18 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Bought one of those a little while ago... at a yard sale... looked brand new!?! Problem was... couldn't clamp it to anything?!? Counter top was just a smidge too thick?!?
    **Tinkerbell**
    Sun Jul 22, 2012 10:34 am
    Food.com Groupie
    kseiverd wrote:
    Bought one of those a little while ago... at a yard sale... looked brand new!?! Problem was... couldn't clamp it to anything?!? Counter top was just a smidge too thick?!?


    If you still have it, I've had good luck clamping things to the pull-out wooden cutting board when my counter top is too thick. I don't know if it's strong enough for a meat grinder, but it does work with my metal apple peeler/corer/slicer.
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