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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Vegetarian / Vegan / ZWT8~ Spice is Nice!
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    ZWT8~ Spice is Nice!

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    Susie D
    Wed Aug 22, 2012 6:41 pm
    Forum Host
    **Jubes** wrote:


    Balti Sauce - Basic Sauce for Anything Goes Curry #409418 by magpie diner
    Kashmiri cuisine - Balti curries are popular in today's Kashmir cuisine. They have spread from the Baltistan region of Pakistani Administered Kashmir
    (source- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kashmiri_cuisine)

    Paneer Paratha #483513 by Alaska Pam
    Within the Punjab region, there are different preferences. People in the area of Amritsar prefer stuffed parathas and milk products. Many of the most popular elements of Anglo-Indian cuisine - such as Tandoor, Naan, Pakoras and vegetable dishes with paneer - derive from the Punjab
    (source- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Punjabi_cuisine)


    Thanks Jubes! Well done! icon_smile.gif
    Susie D
    Wed Aug 22, 2012 6:45 pm
    Forum Host
    Bonnie G #2 wrote:


    I have chosen Southern India

    Aviyal - Indian Mixed Vegetable Stew
    South Indian curries and gravies are famous for thier taste as well as thier healthy appeal. Compared to North Indian Curries, the South Indian states of Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh And Kerala have thier own recipes to boast about..As shown in this one

    Bangaladumpa Vepudu Aka Fried Minted Potatoes
    Most Indian restaurants in America serve North Indian cuisine. Try making a South Indian curry to discover the art of the dry curries and just how flavorful, simple and delicious they can be.


    As you mentioned the regions I gave you credit. Who are the chefs who shared the recipe?
    Susie D
    Wed Aug 22, 2012 6:47 pm
    Forum Host
    AlaskaPam wrote:


    I would like to participate in this challenge for Diners, Winers and Chives.

    Here is my entry:

    Punjab Region-Dishes that are common in the Punjab region contain tomatoes, onion, cumin, tumeric, mustard, garlic and ginger. A typical meal in that region would include daal, curried vegetable, roti and yogurt. Rice is not eaten very often in Punjab. A typical Punjab recipe would be :

    Curry Daal #439037 by Diena B

    Bengal Region-Bengali cooking uses many of the same spices as other parts of India. Cumin, coriander, cinnamon, cardemon and the spice mixture garam masala are common. Mustard seeds are used frequently. Bengali cooking often includes fish and seafood, and the most common way to prepare it is in a curry stew. A typical Bengali recipe would be:

    Salmon in Bengali Mustard Sauce #482974 by MomLuvs6


    Great job! icon_smile.gif
    Susie D
    Wed Aug 22, 2012 6:48 pm
    Forum Host
    soda.gif current to here icon_smile.gif
    FloridaNative
    Wed Aug 22, 2012 10:27 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    For the Honeys....



    Here's a little information about curries...

    REGION: MADRAS, now called CHENNAI


    MADRAS CURRY: featured recipe is Portobello Curry With Green Rice #352501 by Sharon123

    Madras curry is said to originate from the south of India and gets its name from the city of Madras, now known as Chennai, when English merchants arrived there in 1640. However, the name 'Madras Curry' is not used in India, but was invented by restaurants in Britain.

    This curry can be vegetarian or made with meat. It has its origins in Hindu culture and thus authentic recipes are vegetarian.

    There are many variations on Madras curry and cooking in India is more a domestic practice than a cuisine governed by the conventions of chefs, restaurants, or texts. Availability of local or locally available ingredients is central to regional Indian foods. The end result of the signatures of Madras curries can be achieved through different means; the result often being that of: red colour; toasty spices; and the smoothness of coconut (or yoghurt); the sour-sweet fruitiness of tamarind; a slight liquorice flavour of anise; ginger; a range of other spices (sweet and savoury and earthy) and the flavours of salt, sweet and sour. The redness is achieved with chilli or a mixture of chilli and paprika, and the orange of turmeric. A possible variation, to achieve an end result of redness, is also the addition of the fruity-savoury flavours of tomato. The sourness is from the tamarind with the possible addition of lemon, lime or vinegar. The spices are complementary to the fruit and the savoury flavours. The savoury ingredients include garlic (and possibly also onion or asafoetida). The oil may be ghee or coconut oil. Garam masala may be part of the spice mixture with other spices including coriander, and black peppercorns.

    The selected recipe is a perfect example of the use of madras curry. A vegetarian dish, it uses coconut milk, garlic, onion, cilantro, ginger and parsley, lime, red pepper flakes, tomotoes, and of course, madras curry powder.

    REGION: SRI LANKA

    The other curry I chose to talk about is
    SRI LANKAN CURRY - featured recipe Eggplant Curry "no-Fry" Sri Lankan Style Using Coconut #397626 by magpie diner (SriLanka)

    Sri Lankan people use spices liberally in their dishes and typically do not follow an exact recipe: thus, every cook's curry will taste slightly different. Furthermore, people from different regions of the island (for instance, hill-country dwellers versus coastal dwellers) traditionally cook in different ways while people of different ethnic and religious groups tend to prepare dishes according to their customs. Although Sri Lankan food appears similar to South Indian cuisine in its use of chilli, cardamom, cumin, coriander and other spices, it has a distinctive taste, and uses ingredients like dried Maldive fish which are local to the area.

    Sri Lankan food is generally equivalent in terms of spiciness to South Indian cuisine, yet many spicy Sri Lankan preparations are believed to be among the world's hottest in terms of chilli content (Comparable to Sylhet and Bengal). There is a liberal use of different varieties of scorching hot chillies such as amu miris, kochchi miris, and maalu miris (capsicum) among others. While native Sri Lankans are born into this cuisine and develop a healthy tolerance to spicy food, many visitors and tourists to the country often find the spiciness excessive. As a result, many local restaurants in developed and tourist areas offer special low-spice versions of local foods to cater to foreign palates, or have an alternative western menu for tourists. It is generally acceptable for tourists to request that the food is cooked with a lower chilli content to cater for the milder Western palate. The chili content in food cooked for public occasions is typically much less than home-cooked food.

    The featured recipe is an example of the use of Sri Lankan curry - though maybe not a truly authentic example. No mention of peppers, other than 1/2 teaspoon of cayenne, is made. The use of fresh curry leaves may be a component of the "hot" factor for this dish, but I am not familiar enough with Indian cooking to know for sure.

    To be absolutely honest, I had only cooked 1 Indian recipe prior to this tour, and it was quite good. I've made multiple dishes this tour, using curry, and I've been very pleasantly surprised at the light and fresh flavors we've discovered with the Indian dishes. I'll definitely be cooking Indian cuisine again.

    FN wave.gif


    EDITED TO ADD REGIONS 8-23-2012


    Last edited by FloridaNative on Thu Aug 23, 2012 12:49 pm, edited 1 time in total
    Bonnie G #2
    Thu Aug 23, 2012 6:51 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Susie D wrote:
    Bonnie G #2 wrote:


    I have chosen Southern India

    Aviyal - Indian Mixed Vegetable Stew
    South Indian curries and gravies are famous for thier taste as well as thier healthy appeal. Compared to North Indian Curries, the South Indian states of Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh And Kerala have thier own recipes to boast about..As shown in this one

    Bangaladumpa Vepudu Aka Fried Minted Potatoes
    Most Indian restaurants in America serve North Indian cuisine. Try making a South Indian curry to discover the art of the dry curries and just how flavorful, simple and delicious they can be.


    As you mentioned the regions I gave you credit. Who are the chefs who shared the recipe?


    Opps, sorry Aviyal - Indian Mixed Vegetable Stew was alvinakatz

    Bangaladumpa Vepudu Aka Fried Minted Potatoes was also alvinakatz
    threeovens
    Thu Aug 23, 2012 12:53 pm
    Food.com Groupie


    For this challenge I chose to make Madras Vegetable Curry (Vegetarian) #335302 which is a pretty good representation of Goan style curry because of it's use of mild spice, mixed vegetables, especially potatoes and carrots, and coconut milk. (West India)

    A good example of Kashmiri style curry would be Roghan Ghosht #485092. It is made with lamb, yogurt, ginger, garlic, other spices, and freshened with mint leaves. (North India)

    Madras Vegetable Curry (Vegetarian)
    Susie D
    Fri Aug 24, 2012 2:29 pm
    Forum Host
    FloridaNative wrote:
    [

    EDITED TO ADD REGIONS 8-23-2012


    Thanks. You have now completed the challenge. icon_smile.gif
    Susie D
    Fri Aug 24, 2012 2:31 pm
    Forum Host
    Bonnie G #2 wrote:
    [

    Opps, sorry Aviyal - Indian Mixed Vegetable Stew was alvinakatz

    Bangaladumpa Vepudu Aka Fried Minted Potatoes was also alvinakatz


    Got it! You have now completed the challenge. icon_smile.gif
    Susie D
    Fri Aug 24, 2012 2:33 pm
    Forum Host
    threeovens wrote:


    For this challenge I chose to make Madras Vegetable Curry (Vegetarian) #335302 which is a pretty good representation of Goan style curry because of it's use of mild spice, mixed vegetables, especially potatoes and carrots, and coconut milk. (West India)

    A good example of Kashmiri style curry would be Roghan Ghosht #485092. It is made with lamb, yogurt, ginger, garlic, other spices, and freshened with mint leaves. (North India)

    Madras Vegetable Curry (Vegetarian)


    Nice selections. Who were the chefs? icon_wink.gif
    Susie D
    Fri Aug 24, 2012 2:34 pm
    Forum Host
    current to here icon_smile.gif
    momaphet
    Fri Aug 24, 2012 9:52 pm
    Food.com Groupie


    Orissa
    Oriya cuisine (ōḍiā rāndhaṇā) refers to the cooking of the eastern Indian state of Orissa. Foods from this area are rich and varied, while relying heavily on local ingredients. The flavors are usually subtle and delicately spiced, quite unlike the fiery curries typically associated with Indian cuisine. Fish and other seafood such as crab and shrimp are very popular. Panch phutana, a mix of cumin, mustard, fennel, fenugreek and kalonji (nigella) is widely used for flavoring vegetables and dals, while garam masala and turmeric are commonly used for protein-based curries.

    To represent this region I chose Indian Shrimp (Prawn) Curry Indian Shrimp (Prawn) Curry # 484888 by Mikekey

    Gujarati
    Gujarati cuisine is in many ways unique from other culinary traditions of India. It is one of the few cultures where a majority of people are vegetarians. This cuisine is a blend of exquisite flavors and textures.
    For this region I chose a vegetarian dish Masala-Spiced Chickpeas #328056 by Debbie R with it's garam masala spice blend typical of this area.

    I found it interesting that both these dishes use garam masala as their foundational spice but the vegetarian dish of Gujarati adds other spices and ingredients that give it more kick than the milder protein based dish of Orissa
    Susie D
    Sat Aug 25, 2012 12:41 am
    Forum Host
    momaphet wrote:


    Orissa
    Oriya cuisine (ōḍiā rāndhaṇā) refers to the cooking of the eastern Indian state of Orissa. Foods from this area are rich and varied, while relying heavily on local ingredients. The flavors are usually subtle and delicately spiced, quite unlike the fiery curries typically associated with Indian cuisine. Fish and other seafood such as crab and shrimp are very popular. Panch phutana, a mix of cumin, mustard, fennel, fenugreek and kalonji (nigella) is widely used for flavoring vegetables and dals, while garam masala and turmeric are commonly used for protein-based curries.

    To represent this region I chose Indian Shrimp (Prawn) Curry Indian Shrimp (Prawn) Curry # 484888 by Mikekey

    Gujarati
    Gujarati cuisine is in many ways unique from other culinary traditions of India. It is one of the few cultures where a majority of people are vegetarians. This cuisine is a blend of exquisite flavors and textures.
    For this region I chose a vegetarian dish Masala-Spiced Chickpeas #328056 by Debbie R with it's garam masala spice blend typical of this area.

    I found it interesting that both these dishes use garam masala as their foundational spice but the vegetarian dish of Gujarati adds other spices and ingredients that give it more kick than the milder protein based dish of Orissa


    You have completed the challenge. icon_smile.gif
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