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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Mexican / Tex-Mex / Southwest United States / ZWT 8 -- Remember the Alamo
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    ZWT 8 -- Remember the Alamo

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    threeovens
    Thu Aug 09, 2012 9:24 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    The Yellow Rose of Texas
    A short story of time travel in 1836



    'Though it's been round-a-'bout 176 years since the Battle of the Alamo, I feel its high time the record was set to rights. I've been accused of being a yeller, liver-bellied, coward for not standing and defending The Alamo. In fact, I'd become a bit of an urban legend, yessir! Fact 'tis, once a bunch of so called scholars tried to verify the - ahem! - legend they couldn't verify my very existence. Here's why:
    It all started way back in 1823 when Stephen F. Austin established the very first colony of Anglo-Americans in Texas, which was a part of Mexico at the time. He called the colony after hisself, "San Felipe de Austin." It wasn't long afore other Anglo colonies were set up around Austin's. The "Constitution of 1824" was ratified by Mexico calling the territory Coahuila y Tejas.

    It seems the Mexican government was dead set against slavery and that did not set too well with the Anglos. So much so that in 1826 Haden Edwards and his colonists declared themselves an independent republic going by the name "Republic of Fredonia." This caused Mexico to send troops, which were joined by militia of the other colonies, to drive Edwards and his not so merry men, completely out of Texas.

    Also, 'round this time, skirmishes with native tribes were common. Green De Witt's colony was completely burned to the ground, but they later rebuilt.

    It's not that easy to deter a real Texan! Two American presidents (John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson) tried to buy Texas for $1,000,000. Both times they were turned down.

    So, right about 1829 slavery was completely outlawed in Texas and the Anglo American settlers refused to be naturalized as Mexican citizens and just continued to isolate themselves more and more from the Mexican culture and it's government's reforms. Things really came to a head early in 1836. Although Austin and other colonists were hoping for a return to the "Constitution of 1824" it was not to be and the Mexican Government sent "the Napoleon of the West" General Antonio de Padua María Severino López de Santa Anna y Pérez de Lebrón to subdue Coahuila y Tejas.

    Long story short. Even though Santa Anna's Mexican Army far outnumbered the Anglo militias, they were holding there own. Those holed up inside the Alamo were so full of Texas patriotism, that their spirits were quite high. Unbeknownst to most of the defenders, provision were quite low. Each successive commander, from J.C. Neil to Jim Bowie, to William Travis, had each in turn begged for reinforcements and supplies, none of which were forthcoming.

    This is where we come in. It is not widely known, but Diners and Winers are a team that steps in to help stave off hunger during historical emergencies. We are time travelers and as such, we keep a low profile because most people could never understand what we do. Our Captain, Boomette keeps a watchful eye on history so we can swoop in whenever provisions are low and feed the hungry before they even realize what is happening. Such is the case here. Without the genius of our Cookbook Guru, Lainey6605, we could never expect to get in and out before the next skirmish. Our chief baker is Bonnie G #2, she is a wiz at coming up with something for every period in history no matter how rudimentary the apparati we have to cook on. I took on the main course, being the lone man and all, I like to take charge whenever there is any grilling or manly meat cooking to be done. threeovens is an indifferent rice maker. Sometimes it's pretty good and other times well...lets just say she needs the practice, but luckily, this time she came through like a trooper, or is that trouper? Anyhow, we can always depend on Pesto lover. She can and will cook anything and everything. Our barrista, AlaskaPam is world famous. We have one part-timer, Marcasite Queen. When she can join us, she always comes through in a big way. Our first mate, mersaydees took time out of her busy schedule to make the avocado soup, a real favorite of Jim Bowie, who we all know was laid up with some mysterious illness.

    We followed a simple menu, which can be found here Diners, Winers, and Chives - The Yellow Rose of Texas.

    Here are some photos:

    Caf� De Olla: Sweet Cinnamon Coffee
    Josefinas
    Mexican Yellow Rice and Black Beans
    Creamy Caramel Flan

    Soon after the repast word was brought in by Commander Travis' cousin, James Bonham, that reinforcements would not be coming. Knowing how dire the situation, Travis drew a line in the sand with his bayonet. He released the men from their obligation to continue the fight and said they were free to leave the Alamo. He entreated any who wished to remain to defend the Alamo and continue the fight for the independence of Texas to step across said line. It is true that Jim Bowie commanded four men to carry him, still bedridden in his cot, across the line in the sand. I was so caught up in the flood of patriotism, that I fully intended to cross that line and stay and fight, but at that exact moment, Captain Boomette worked her magic and we were all whisked away. From that day forward the legend went forth of the coward, Moses Rose, who refused to stay and fight.

    Which brings me to ponder why they thought I was Moses Rose. I am not. I am Celticevergreen. Moses Rose was actually Louis "Moses" Rose, a French Lieutenant who never actually left that continent. But you can call me Chives.



    Last edited by threeovens on Thu Aug 09, 2012 10:13 pm, edited 1 time in total
    threeovens
    Thu Aug 09, 2012 9:34 pm
    Food.com Groupie


    threeovens #865936 has MERP'd

    for the Alamo Part Deux challenge:

    Mexican Yellow Rice and Black Beans #178494 by Paula G
    Mikekey
    Thu Aug 09, 2012 11:00 pm
    Food.com Groupie


    Made and reviewed Beef Tortilla Cake -#370187 by Boomette

    Muffin Goddess
    Thu Aug 09, 2012 11:25 pm
    Food.com Groupie


    For The Honeys, I have made Zucchini Chocolate Orange Cake #134779 by ~Leslie~ for this challenge (story by FloridaNative and other recipes by LifeisGood and Studentchef coming soon icon_wink.gif )





    icon_biggrin.gif
    PaulaG
    Fri Aug 10, 2012 9:40 am
    Forum Host
    threeovens wrote:
    The Yellow Rose of Texas
    A short story of time travel in 1836



    'Though it's been round-a-'bout 176 years since the Battle of the Alamo, I feel its high time the record was set to rights. I've been accused of being a yeller, liver-bellied, coward for not standing and defending The Alamo. In fact, I'd become a bit of an urban legend, yessir! Fact 'tis, once a bunch of so called scholars tried to verify the - ahem! - legend they couldn't verify my very existence. Here's why:
    It all started way back in 1823 when Stephen F. Austin established the very first colony of Anglo-Americans in Texas, which was a part of Mexico at the time. He called the colony after hisself, "San Felipe de Austin." It wasn't long afore other Anglo colonies were set up around Austin's. The "Constitution of 1824" was ratified by Mexico calling the territory Coahuila y Tejas.

    It seems the Mexican government was dead set against slavery and that did not set too well with the Anglos. So much so that in 1826 Haden Edwards and his colonists declared themselves an independent republic going by the name "Republic of Fredonia." This caused Mexico to send troops, which were joined by militia of the other colonies, to drive Edwards and his not so merry men, completely out of Texas.

    Also, 'round this time, skirmishes with native tribes were common. Green De Witt's colony was completely burned to the ground, but they later rebuilt.

    It's not that easy to deter a real Texan! Two American presidents (John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson) tried to buy Texas for $1,000,000. Both times they were turned down.

    So, right about 1829 slavery was completely outlawed in Texas and the Anglo American settlers refused to be naturalized as Mexican citizens and just continued to isolate themselves more and more from the Mexican culture and it's government's reforms. Things really came to a head early in 1836. Although Austin and other colonists were hoping for a return to the "Constitution of 1824" it was not to be and the Mexican Government sent "the Napoleon of the West" General Antonio de Padua María Severino López de Santa Anna y Pérez de Lebrón to subdue Coahuila y Tejas.

    Long story short. Even though Santa Anna's Mexican Army far outnumbered the Anglo militias, they were holding there own. Those holed up inside the Alamo were so full of Texas patriotism, that their spirits were quite high. Unbeknownst to most of the defenders, provision were quite low. Each successive commander, from J.C. Neil to Jim Bowie, to William Travis, had each in turn begged for reinforcements and supplies, none of which were forthcoming.

    This is where we come in. It is not widely known, but Diners and Winers are a team that steps in to help stave off hunger during historical emergencies. We are time travelers and as such, we keep a low profile because most people could never understand what we do. Our Captain, Boomette keeps a watchful eye on history so we can swoop in whenever provisions are low and feed the hungry before they even realize what is happening. Such is the case here. Without the genius of our Cookbook Guru, Lainey6605, we could never expect to get in and out before the next skirmish. Our chief baker is Bonnie G #2, she is a wiz at coming up with something for every period in history no matter how rudimentary the apparati we have to cook on. I took on the main course, being the lone man and all, I like to take charge whenever there is any grilling or manly meat cooking to be done. threeovens is an indifferent rice maker. Sometimes it's pretty good and other times well...lets just say she needs the practice, but luckily, this time she came through like a trooper, or is that trouper? Anyhow, we can always depend on Pesto lover. She can and will cook anything and everything. Our barrista, AlaskaPam is world famous. We have one part-timer, Marcasite Queen. When she can join us, she always comes through in a big way. Our first mate, mersaydees took time out of her busy schedule to make the avocado soup, a real favorite of Jim Bowie, who we all know was laid up with some mysterious illness.

    We followed a simple menu, which can be found here Diners, Winers, and Chives - The Yellow Rose of Texas.

    Here are some photos:

    Caf� De Olla: Sweet Cinnamon Coffee
    Josefinas
    Mexican Yellow Rice and Black Beans
    Creamy Caramel Flan

    Soon after the repast word was brought in by Commander Travis' cousin, James Bonham, that reinforcements would not be coming. Knowing how dire the situation, Travis drew a line in the sand with his bayonet. He released the men from their obligation to continue the fight and said they were free to leave the Alamo. He entreated any who wished to remain to defend the Alamo and continue the fight for the independence of Texas to step across said line. It is true that Jim Bowie commanded four men to carry him, still bedridden in his cot, across the line in the sand. I was so caught up in the flood of patriotism, that I fully intended to cross that line and stay and fight, but at that exact moment, Captain Boomette worked her magic and we were all whisked away. From that day forward the legend went forth of the coward, Moses Rose, who refused to stay and fight.

    Which brings me to ponder why they thought I was Moses Rose. I am not. I am Celticevergreen. Moses Rose was actually Louis "Moses" Rose, a French Lieutenant who never actually left that continent. But you can call me Chives.



    Thank you much for your story and history lesson. I thoroughly enjoyed it. icon_smile.gif
    PaulaG
    Fri Aug 10, 2012 9:42 am
    Forum Host
    threeovens wrote:


    threeovens #865936 has MERP'd

    for the Alamo Part Deux challenge:

    Mexican Yellow Rice and Black Beans #178494 by Paula G


    What a pretty picture and nice surprise. Thank you very much. icon_smile.gif
    PaulaG
    Fri Aug 10, 2012 9:44 am
    Forum Host
    Mikekey wrote:


    Made and reviewed Beef Tortilla Cake -#370187 by Boomette



    Thank you much. Very nice photo. The completion has been noted.
    PaulaG
    Fri Aug 10, 2012 9:47 am
    Forum Host
    Muffin Goddess wrote:


    For The Honeys, I have made Zucchini Chocolate Orange Cake #134779 by ~Leslie~ for this challenge (story by FloridaNative and other recipes by LifeisGood and Studentchef coming soon icon_wink.gif )





    icon_biggrin.gif


    I want some cake. It looks very moist and delicious.
    CJAY
    Fri Aug 10, 2012 3:26 pm
    Food.com Groupie

    I made and reviewed Oaxacan- Style Grilled Corn on the Cob #483857 by IngridH for the Remember The Alamo challenge.
    KateL
    Sat Aug 11, 2012 1:43 pm
    Food.com Groupie


    KateL posting Part 1:

    Time travel has made visits into history so easy for the average foodie. The Wild Bunch signed up for one such outing, determined to offer a memorable meal so that we could return home and reminisce: “Remember the Alamo?” Our menu combined staples of the era as well as a touch of luxury fitting to honor this corps of men standing between a ruthless Santa Anna and the rise of an independent Republic of Texas.

    Our time machine actually made two stops. Insisting on fresh ingredients, in Goliad, Debbie R. gathered garlic, onions, tomato, chiles, and whipping cream while IngridH secured several fat pigs, pinto beans, and cinnamon. Then they rejoined the rest of us as we made our major stop, landing just outside the Alamo’s kitchen. Momaphet led the way, spotting an impressive Susanna Dickinson.

    Momaphet couldn’t help but wonder why Susanna Dickinson was there, especially with her 15-month-old child, Angelina.


    Mrs. Dickinson patiently recounted the story of her family: how at age 17 she had left Tennessee with her 22-year-old husband, Almaron, to settle in the DeWitt Colony, Texas, in 1831. Almaron set up a blacksmith shop and even partnered in a hat shop. But by the fall of 1835, Almaron was among the original 18 defenders of the Gonzales cannon in The Battle of Gonzales; in fact, he was in charge of the cannon at the time of confrontation. From there he joined a group of volunteers to help secure San Antonio for the Texans, and served as an aide to General Edward Burleson during the Siege of Bexar (December 1835). Susanna (as she now permitted us to call her) had stayed behind with the infant, but a few weeks after Almaron left for Bexar, her home was looted by members of an East Texas militia. So much for staying out of harm’s way by staying home! Susanna and infant moved into the Musquiz house in San Antonio, but when Mexican troops arrived in San Antonio on February 23, 1836, the entire Dickinson family moved into the Alamo. Almaron’s blacksmith skills made him invaluable to the defense, and Susanna managed the food stores, knowing all needed food fuel to withstand the siege.

    We were welcomed into The Alamo partly because pammyowl and smellyvegetarian had seen fit to bring butter, wheat flour, anise seed, orange, eggs, orange liqueur, vanilla extract, baking powder, lemon, and candy nonpareil sprinkles to make a special bread, Pan De Muerto (Mexican Bread of the Dead), and Galletas Elena (Mexican Cookies).

    Pammy and smelly knew that their luxury ingredients required only the simplest baking techniques, so they would be easy to bake in the Alamo’s kitchen. Even so, pammyowl enlisted Maryland Jim’s help to beat in the anise seeds, etc., since her Kitchenaid mixer would have found no electrical outlet. Maryland Jim also remembered to bring whiskey, knowing that was considered a basic food supply for the troops.

    To say we were starstruck would be an understatement.


    Smelly immediately sought out Tennessee Congressman and hunter David Crockett. (Her family swears it is related by blood to Davy Crockett. However, Davy was a bit taken aback when Smelly told him this. He melted when Smelly asked him to recount some of his favorite exploits.) Davy Crockett liked his nickname, “King of the Wild Frontier”; his backwoods oratory/storytelling had won him a seat in the U.S. Congress. In fact, due to his opposition to President Andrew Jackson’s policies (specifically the Indian Removal Act), he narrowly lost his bid for re-election in 1834, and his resulting anger compelled him to head for Texas in the fall of 1835. Of course, being “The” Davy Crockett, he arrived in Texas after holding court in various cities; at that time in history, Davy Crockett was like a rock star. On January 9, 1836 he wrote a daughter back in Tennessee, “"I would rather be in my present situation than to be elected to a seat in Congress for life." (Smelly thought to herself, “Be careful what you wish for…”)


    Gailanng searched for the colorful Jim Bowie, who had spent most of his life in Louisiana before heading to Texas for the promise of land and riches. She found him set up on a cot in his room. Poor Jim had collapsed on February 24, and his doctors had described his disease "of a peculiar nature." That had ended his active participation in commanding the garrison. (Retrospective diagnosis has concluded that what once was thought to have been pneumonia or typhoid pneumonia, was probably advanced tuberculosis.) The only bright aspect of his illness was that it made William Barret Travis the undisputed commanding officier during the Siege and Battle of the Alamo. Gailanng made sure that Jim Bowie had food to eat and coffee with whiskey to drink.

    Katew was fascinated by Brigido Guerrero, a private in Bowie’s company, from Tallenango, Mexico. Just why would he have deserted the Mexican Army to join the Texians? “Senora,” he said, “James (Bowie) is also a Mexican as he took a Mexican wife and built a life in the Mexican territory called 'Coahuila Y Tejas'. When Mexico had a federal government, we were all happy. But Santa Anna, he ruined everything, by declaring that citizens must not bear arms. Ha, Senor Bowie is so Anglo, so full of American “civil rights”, he did not want to be reigned in. Me, neither! So instead of being forced to be in the Mexican army with people who didn’t even know how to hold a gun and were just as likely to shoot their fellow solder as hit the enemy, I decided to join up with the fearless Jim Bowie.” Katew thought a moment, and then asked, “Have you ever heard of Samuel Butler’s poem, ‘Hudibras’?” “No, Senora.” Katew continued, “Consider this: ‘For, those that fly, may fight againe, Which he can never do that's slain.’ At home we would say, 'He who fights and runs away, may live to fight another day.'” Brigido Guerrero reflected on this a while. “So if I am asked, I might say I have been a prisoner of war, and am ready to return to serve Santa Anna?” “Just think about it overnight,” purred katew.

    Mexico's map circa 1824:


    Hailing from Ohio, Debbie R. gave a thumbs up welcome to William B. Harrison, from Ohio, too. He had formed a company known as the “Tennessee Mounted Volunteers” in Nacogdoches, Texas on January 14, 1836, and his company had reached the Alamo on February 23, the day before the Siege began. His company defended the wooden palisade stretching between the Alamo chapel and the Low Barracks.



    IngridH worked her way to the garrison walls, where she found her hero, William Barret Travis. “We heard you needed supplies, so we have brought food for tonight’s dinner. We regret that none of us are trained to assist in the defense, for we have heard your pleas for reinforcements. You are a brave man, Colonel Travis!”

    At that, Momaphet gathered all together for dinner:

    ZWT8 The Wild Bunch at The Alamo

    “We have unlimited coffee, because we know that in Texas, there is always a pot on.”

    “We made you corn soup, just as you might have any day, but we made the best corn soup we could provision.”

    "We brought no salad or vegetables, as we have heard many a time how Texans hate roughage and suspect it as a source of typhoid fever."

    “We have freshly butchered some pigs so that you fine Defenders may have the best meat. Alas, Jim Bowie was too weak, but he lent Maryland Jim his famous Bowie knife to do the honors.” (Maryland Jim will tell THAT story for the rest of HIS life icon_biggrin.gif)

    “To make sure no one goes hungry tonight, IngridH made beans as you might find in the best restaurant.”


    “And our two bakers, pammyowl and smellyvegetarian, have outdone themselves by bringing their own supplies so that you may have special flour bread and cookies. May the nonpareil sprinkles remind you of the cannons you shot back at Santa Anna!”




    “Whiskey all around! We salute you!”

    In ten minutes, dinner was over. That is how it was at that time in Texas. We smiled as the men used only knives and spoons – no forks -- and gulped down the food. (Fortunately our children were not here to witness this – how would we ever get them to eat in a civilized way after seeing this?)

    As Travis’s slave, Joe, began to clear the dishes, KateL took him aside. “Joe, things don’t look good for tonight or tomorrow. But know this: Santa Anna has repeatedly said that he will not kill slaves, as Mexico is opposed to slavery. You have a unique role in history.” He nodded, for he already knew.

    And as suddenly as The Wild Bunch had appeared, they were spirited back to the present in their time machine.
    Studentchef
    Sat Aug 11, 2012 3:00 pm
    Food.com Groupie



    I am tagging Mango Coconut Whiz, #436267 by Sharon123
    PaulaG
    Sat Aug 11, 2012 6:51 pm
    Forum Host
    Kate,

    Thank you very much for participating. I really enjoyed reading your story. Your team has been updated on page 1.

    Paula
    HokiesMom
    Sat Aug 11, 2012 10:49 pm
    Food.com Groupie



    The Insider at the Battle of the Alamo ~ James Bowie

    Now if you hear the word Bowie you conjure up usually a couple of quick references...

    There is David Bowie ~

    But we are not talking about him today but he does play into this main character a

    There is the bowie knife ~

    we are getting closer...as this knife was named this after our main character.

    But today we are going to learn more about James Bowie ~

    A legendary figure in Texas history and who played a large role in the Battle of the Alamo.

    After Sam Houston received word that Santa Anna was leading a large force to San Antonio, Bowie offered to lead volunteers to defend the Alamo from the expected attack. He arrived with 30 men on January 19, 1836 where they found a force of 104 men with a few weapons and a few cannons, but not many supplies and little gunpowder. Sam Houston knew that there were not enough men to hold the fort in an attack and had given James Bowie authority to remove the artillery and blow up the fortification. Bowie and the Alamo commander, James C. Neill, decided they did not have enough oxen to move the artillery, and they did not want to destroy the fortress. On January 26, one of Bowie's men, James Bonham, organized a rally which passed a resolution in favor of holding the Alamo. Bonham signed the resolution first, with Bowie's signature second.


    Through Bowie's connections because of his marriage and his fluency in Spanish, the predominantly Mexican population of San Antonio often furnished him with information about the movements of the Mexican army. After learning that Santa Anna had 4,500 troops and was heading for the city, Bowie wrote several letters to the provisional government asking for help in defending the Alamo, especially "men, money, rifles, and cannon powder".

    Well the general did not really listen and instead sent in the Jammin' Jazzberries to make breakfast for the men so they were strengthened before their battle. This was all possible through the miracle of time travel. The Jammin' Jazzberries: Alligirl, BigBadBrenda, HokiesMom, Dienia B., AZPARZYCH, Cookgirl, Elaniemay, January Bride, and Chef Pot Pie, were bringing wonderful dishes and the benefit of a gas stove, a generator, and other supplies back in time to serve these brave men. So on February 2nd we set out on our back in time breakfast event! Here is our menu:
    JJ's Remember the Alamo

    To start things off being February even in TX causes one to feel chilly in the morning. Because Cookgirl's hands are always cold we felt we'd leave her in charge of the drink table so she could warm her hands around a mug of the coffee we were serving too.

    Our team is very much a group of overachievers so Dienia B and BigBadBrenda were in charge of serving not one but 3 main dishes for the troops. One of them could even be considered a lunch item but we felt it was well served for breakfast. These three ladies did an awesome job organizing the supply list before we left the year 2012 and even with all those years of travel and the rough landing (there are always bumps in a road when traveling back in time over 100 years! icon_lol.gif ) not one egg was broken in transit! HokiesMom thinks she is going to try to patent the egg crates and cartons they used to help out all local groceries who seem to not get the idea we don't want our eggs cracked and scrambled before we buy them! icon_lol.gif Okay back to the story....

    January Bride suggested two wonderful appetizers which we were using as side dishes for the breakfast, one being her own salsa recipe with a twist. The men devoured these along with the fresh tortilla chips JB made once we were set up.

    Poor AZPARZYCH being almost 9 months pregnant landed with achy swollen feet and was grateful that she just had to make just over 100 servings of her breakfast salad which was simple to do the math as the original recipe was for a serving of one! We are just hoping she does not go into labor until we return as we are all too busy making breakfast to deliver a baby too...a gal can only multi-task so much! icon_wink.gif

    Chef Pot Pie the ever efficient woman that she is finished up the last of the decorations needed for her daughter's wedding right before we left and we felt to be kind to her we left her to make a side dish of rice that fit right into the local cuisine and also would help warm the men up from the inside out with the use of the peppers. Being it was her recipe it was easy for her to make too as she did not need to keep referring to a recipe. We did not know how the web connection would be from 100 years back to the food.com website - sometimes those gremlins hit when we least expect it on the site! icon_eek.gif

    Elaniemay is a wonderful baker and so she had the task of making the breads for this meal. The men were taken with her cute and spunky personality and of course raved about the pizzazz in which she served the breads. They said her breads reminded them of Christmas morning at their homesteads. I think we caught her blushing a time or two due to all the accolades.

    Our team captain Alligirl then worked with HokiesMom on the dessert course. They felt that every meal should have something that is considered a bit sweet and felt that fresh fruit dishes would be welcomed with open arms. We were not disappointed.

    After all was said and done, as a team we worked together and threw all the dirty dishes into the industrial sized dishwasher we brought along and got things cleared up lickity split. We were glad we chose that day as after spending the day speaking with James Bowie about his desires for more troops, the morning of February 3rd, Davey Crockett appeared with only 30 Tennesseans. Only 30!! What were they thinking??

    To make sure that us ladies were not drafted to help out we decided to high-tail it back to our homes in the year 2012 and watch the actions finish out through a good google search. We discovered some sad news...

    On February 23, the bells of San Fernando sounded the alarm of the Mexicans approach. Travis ordered all the Texican forces into the Alamo. James Bowie hurried to gather provisions and herd cattle into the Alamo compound. Fearing for the safety of his wife's relatives in San Antonio, Bowie invited her cousins Getrudis Navarro and Juana Navarro Alsbury, as well as Alsbury's 18-month-old son, Alijo Perez Jr., to stay inside the walls of the Alamo. Bowie also brought several black servants, some of which worked at the Veramendi Palace, into the security of the Alamo fortress. Bowie had been ill, and two doctors, including the fort surgeon, were unable to diagnose his illness. Travis became the sole commander of the forces when Bowie was confined to bed. Santa Anna and his army began a siege of the Alamo on February 24. The Mexican army raised a red flag to warn the defenders that no quarter would be given. Bowie and Travis began sending out couriers with pleas for provisions and assistance. Travis sent Juan Seguin on Bowie's horse, to recruit reinforcements on February 25, and 32 additional men arrived. On February 26, David Crockett reported that Bowie, though suffering from his affliction, continued to crawl from his bed around noon every day and presented himself to the Alamo's inhabitants, which much boosted the morale of his comrades. When Travis realized that the Mexican army would likely prevail, he drew a line in the sand and asked those willing to die for the cause to cross the line. At Bowie's request Crockett and several others carried the cot over the line, leaving only one man named Rose alone on the other side. Bowie perished with the rest of the Alamo defenders on March 6, when the Mexicans attacked. Most of the noncombatants in the fort, including Bowie's relatives, survived. Bowie died on his cot, "back braced against the wall, and using his pistols and his famous knife.



    So at the beginning of this tale it was said that the two other "Bowies" you probably thought of were tied to our main character James Bowie and it was not a joke. David Bowie, who was born David Robert Hayward-Jones, changed his name in the 1960s because he feared his name was too similar to Davy Jones, a member of the already famous The Monkees. He chose the surname Bowie because he admired James Bowie and the Bowie knife. And speaking of the Bowie knife...stories of James Bowie's prowess with a knife, led to the widespread popularity of the Bowie knife, named specifically to relate to his legendary status.



    James Bowie - a legendary hero of Texas.
    FloridaNative
    Sun Aug 12, 2012 12:43 am
    Food.com Groupie

    I hope I did this right...


    For the Honeys…

    Remember the Alamo Challenge (Part 1)




    While participating in ZWT8 and traveling through Mexico and Southwest US, the Honeys (that’s the Herbaceous Curvaceous Honeys) decided to attend a “Remember the Alamo” festival on March 6th. Shopping was in order, so we bought the most authentic costumes we could find and set out on horseback for the festival grounds, with out bags packed. Our guide Garcia took us across an area in San Antonio, pointing out areas to interest and telling us stories about the Battle of the Alamo. We ended up arriving at our lovely hotel on March 4, a few days before the festival.

    All a little saddle-sore from the journey, Captain Muffin Goddess and Cookbook Guru Studentchef decided we needed a bit of relaxation and created a wonderful concoction called Mango Coconut Whiz – which we all imbibed in some quantity. Iewe also mixed up a large bowl of Sangria for us to drink. I must say, FloridaNative got a bit carried away with the cocktails (she loves a good sangria) and proceeded to get pixilated and promptly fell into a deep sleep on the sofa. The story she tells she swears really happened, but the Honeys say they never left the hotel.


    Here’s how the story goes: FloridaNative woke up and saw all the Honeys sleeping together in a very rustic room. All the Honeys were dressed in their period “costumes” and FN wondered if she had overslept and missed the festival. Outside there was rumbling and what sounded like gunfire.



    The Honeys gathered together and decided to try and figure out where they were, since all the ladies agreed THIS was NOT the hotel they stayed in last night.

    Dreamer in Ontario wandered out into the courtyard and came running back in. “We must be in the middle of a reenactment of the Alamo, because there are soldiers in uniforms all over the place and guys wearing buckskin!” iewe ran outside and the rest of us followed. We asked a passing soldier what was going on. “You’re at the Alamo Mission, ma’am, and you need to get back inside. There’s a fightin’ goin’ on.” With that the soldier ran off to join his fellow soldiers.

    At that point, we noticed the tall palisade walls that surrounded the mission, which were about 10 to 12 feet tall. Catwalks (constructed by Texas engineer Green B. Jameson) were built up along the walls and the soldiers and the buckskinclad Texans were standing along them, SHOOTING at people on the other side. Cannons were firing rounds every so often and the harsh smell of spent gunpowder was in the air. What had we gotten ourselves into?

    A man marched over to us and brusquely introduced himself as Commander William B Travis. He told us the provisions he had managed to gather were in the kitchen and told us to start making up victuals for the soldiers and Texans. We all looked at him like he was crazy. Studentchef spoke up, saying “Mr. Travis, you must be mistaken. We’re here for the festival; we’re not the caterers!” Travis, who we later found out was the sole commander here at the Alamo, put his face right up to hers and said in a very strong voice, “Ma’am, I don’t care what you came here for, but we need you to get some victuals made for these boys, or Santa Anna is going to get the best of us! Cook enough for 100 people and work with the provisions that are in the kitchen.” Studentchef held his stare for a few seconds, then said, “We’ll do what we can to help.” Travis turned on his heel and headed back to the wall.

    Blasts and cannon booms could be heard all around as we headed back into the mission to find what we could to create something to help nourish the soldiers. FloridaNative gave a little “whoop-whoop” when she found avocadoes, tomatoes and onions in the cellar. Flour, corn meal, salt, eggs and butter were scavenged and set on the large wooden work table. Ma Field was digging in the cellar with FloridaNative and she found a huge bushel baskets of squash, peppers, and carrots, bags of dried beans, rice, and a large hunk of smoked bacon. A cloth sack filled with oranges and limes was found and we knew we could use these to liven up the dishes we would prepare.

    LifeisGood helped haul the vegetables it into the kitchen. Ah…the kitchen – if you could call it a kitchen – was not what we were used to. Large ovens were built into the walls and a huge fireplace seemed to be warming the room and heating the ovens. Large cast iron pots and skillets were stacked on shelves next to the fireplace. Wooden utensils were piled into crocks near the pots. We split up into 3 teams and decided to make the best victuals these boys had ever eaten with what we had on hand.

    Studentchef hauled water in from the well right outside the kitchen – at least she didn’t have to go too far. LifeisGood and Muffin Goddess started putting together the ingredients for a cake. LifeisGood found a chocolate bar she had stashed in her pocket so they added that to the cake batter. MaField and Sharon123 put their heads together and got the dried beans and rice cooking over the fire in one of the huge pots. Breezermom was chopping tomatoes, peppers, onions, avocadoes and carrots with a wicked looking knife in order to make up some vegetable dishes and add some to the rice and beans. Dreamer and iewe mixed up several large skillets with cornbread to go in the oven with the cake. We were on our way! We could hear yelling and gunshots outside. We didn’t feel exactly safe in the kitchen, but the camaraderie was as thick as it must have been out on the walls.

    After several hours in the kitchen, the food was ready. Breezer made some sides with fresh vegetables and had also thrown together a black bean dip. We cut the corn bread up and smeared the dip on the slices. The chocolate cake came out good – we had to try a taste of course, but it did not rise as much as today’s cakes would have. The rice and beans dish was hearty and spicy, and we gave MaField and Sharon123 knuckle bumps for a job well done. FloridaNative and MuffinGoddess had concocted an omelet dish using avocadoes and bits of the vegetables and those were being prepared and set in a warming pans in the brick ovens along with the cornbread that iewe and Dreamer had prepared. Studentchef and LifeisGood were preparing plates and utensils for the meal and hauling water in for cleanup. We had all chipped in a bit and prepared a sangrita with the vegetable and fruit juices left over from our meal preparation.

    While we were putting the finishing touches on our meal, several soldiers and scouts came in looking for food, saying they hadn’t had a decent meal in weeks and had been waiting for a chance to get some decent food in their bellies. They had just arrived the night before, sneaking through enemy lines to bring reinforcements for the Texans. They told us that Santa Anna’s army was advancing and they were waiting on more reinforcements to show up. They had sent Jim Bowie’s cousin Juana Alsbury out to Santa Anna to negotiate a surrender, but Santa Anna didn’t want to play that way. He wanted his glory at the expense of Texas lives. This made us feel sad. A weary looking Texan walked into the kitchen and asked us to make him up a pack of food for the trip – he said he was James Allen and was a courier. Travis was sending him off at first light with messages from Travis and some of the other men, again requesting reinforcements. We made up a really big pack of food for him with an extra large slice of chocolate cake.

    Throughout the day the soldiers, scouts and some civilians came and went, eating their fill and for a short time, focused their attention on something other than the battle that was raging on around them and Mexican army that was ever growing beyond the walls. There was an air of defiant acceptance that lingered even after the last soldier had eaten his fill. After cleaning up the plates and washing them in the wooden tub on the kitchen floor, we swept up and went back to the sleeping area. We were exhausted but glad we could help out the soldiers and Texans. It was hard to go to sleep – there was still occasional gunfire after dark, but things were eerily quiet even with so many people around.



    FloridaNative’s story ended there. She woke up and said we were all back at the hotel. We went to the “Remember the Alamo” festival and had a nice time, though we were all in a somber mood. We found out some interesting facts about the last night before the last battle of the Alamo. At 5:30 am the day after our time-travel adventure, the Mexican troops advanced on the Alamo – and so soundly defeated the tired and sickly Texans that the battle was over by 6:30 am. Many brave and courageous men fought that battle to prevent the taking of the Alamo by Santa Anna, but they were not victorious. We all felt a bit more humbled knowing we had fed and cared for these weary soldiers before their final battle, even if it was only in a dream.



    FN for the Honeys
    The Alamo Menu: ZWT8 - The Honeys Remember the Alamo Meal #89128

    MomLuvs6
    Sun Aug 12, 2012 1:24 am
    Food.com Groupie


    Sorry, Forgot icon_redface.gif to post in this thread that I would be making for Remember the Alamo:
    The Mountain #228738 by diner524

    ML6 icon_smile.gif
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