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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Kid-friendly Cooking (Baby Food on up to Teens) / ZWT8 ~ Go Wild Challenge ~ Australia/New Zealand
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    ZWT8 ~ Go Wild Challenge ~ Australia/New Zealand

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    Elaniemay
    Wed Aug 08, 2012 2:24 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Got it thanks!
    awalde
    Wed Aug 08, 2012 4:56 pm
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    My DS is still 16 and he will do it............ or better I will convince him to do it!

    icon_wink.gif icon_smile.gif
    breezermom
    Wed Aug 08, 2012 10:58 pm
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    I will do this challenge for the Honey's. I will be "borrowing" my co-worker's granddaughter, since my "baby" is 21 and I don't have grandkids yet. She is 5 1/2 and I will find out tomorrow which animal she chooses.
    Jostlori
    Thu Aug 09, 2012 1:09 am
    Food.com Groupie


    Thank you to Jubes for lending us her daughter Holly to complete this challenge for the Om Nom Nommers!

    Here's Holly working her magic...


    Holly is eight years old and LOVES birds! They have a bush reserve behind their home and have a kookaburra family that visits them each morning and before sunset for a piece of meat each. Jubes says they are such characters and "laugh" to wake Holly up in the mornings.

    Reminds me of a song we used to sing in elementary school (in California!) back in the 60's: "Kookaburra sits in the old gum tree, Merry merry king of the bush is he, Laugh, Kookaburra laugh, Kookaburra gay your life must be". Wow, don't know where that came from!!! icon_wink.gif

    So back on subject, it's not surprising that Holly picked the kookaburra for her masterpiece. The website showed different Aussie animals and states- Holly and her family live in New South Wales.

    And now with a drum roll please.... here is Holly's beautiful work of art. Thanks Holly & Jubes!
    **Jubes**
    Thu Aug 09, 2012 7:58 am
    Forum Host
    FloridaNative wrote:


    Hiya wave.gif

    for the Honeys...
    I drafted my 13 year old DD Rachel (aka Jillyray) to do a drawing for this challenge. She chose the koala bear, because "that's the first animal that came to mind and daddy said the same thing!" icon_rolleyes.gif My girl is a budding young artist, singer and musician and she has really gotten into her sketchpad this summer while off from school. Here is her "really quick" rendition of a koala bear.



    FN icon_biggrin.gif


    Beautiful work Rachel icon_biggrin.gif
    I love that you drew the koala yourself.
    **Jubes**
    Thu Aug 09, 2012 8:00 am
    Forum Host
    Jostlori wrote:


    Thank you to Jubes for lending us her daughter Holly to complete this challenge for the Om Nom Nommers!

    Here's Holly working her magic...


    Holly is eight years old and LOVES birds! They have a bush reserve behind their home and have a kookaburra family that visits them each morning and before sunset for a piece of meat each. Jubes says they are such characters and "laugh" to wake Holly up in the mornings.

    Reminds me of a song we used to sing in elementary school (in California!) back in the 60's: "Kookaburra sits in the old gum tree, Merry merry king of the bush is he, Laugh, Kookaburra laugh, Kookaburra gay your life must be". Wow, don't know where that came from!!! icon_wink.gif

    So back on subject, it's not surprising that Holly picked the kookaburra for her masterpiece. The website showed different Aussie animals and states- Holly and her family live in New South Wales.

    And now with a drum roll please.... here is Holly's beautiful work of art. Thanks Holly & Jubes!


    Thanks Lori. Holly was happy to hel icon_biggrin.gif Great work Holly !

    We also sang that same song here when we were at school. The kids today learn slightly different words

    -Julie
    **Jubes**
    Thu Aug 09, 2012 8:10 am
    Forum Host
    Elaniemay wrote:


    Michela age 8 chose the Piping Shrike. She chose to use kitchen ingredients. She used chocolate syrup, white chocolate syrup, bay leaves and frosting.
    The Piping Shrike is a white backed magpie. It is found in Southern Australia. It is omnivorous. It has adapted well to human habitation and is a familiar bird of parks, gardens and farmland in Australia and is commonly fed by households around the country. This magpie measures 14.5–17 in in length, with distinctive black and white plumage, gold brown eyes and a solid wedge-shaped bluish-white and black bill. The male and female are similar in appearance, and can be distinguished by differences in back markings. Because of its long legs it walks rather than waddles and spends much of its time on the ground. The Piping Shrike is the emblematic bird that appears on South Australia's flag, State Badge and Coat of Arms.

    Cameron age 3 chose the Queensland Koala. He followed big sister and used kitchen ingredients as well. He used pepper, nutmeg, cloves and thyme.
    The Queensland Koala
    Koalas spend most of their lives in trees. Their large paws have strong claws that they use to get a grip on limbs. They can climb by gripping a branch with their front paws and bringing their back paws up to their front. Then they move their front claws up and repeat this motion. This motion is very slow in order to conserve energy. They also sleep up to 18 hours each day. The koala has a very short tail, so it cannot be used to hold onto trees. Female koalas have a pouch, a distinguishing characteristic of marsupials. Males are up to 50 percent larger than females and have a broader face. In tropical and sub-tropical Queensland the koala is smaller (at around 6.5 kg (14 lb) for an average male and just over 5 kg (11 lb) for an average female); a lighter often rather scruffy grey in colour; and has shorter, thinner fur.
    Koalas are found only in Australia. They prefer to live in eucalypt forests, since the eucalyptus tree is its preferred diet. The Koala has been known to feed on a large number of eucalypt and non-eucalypt trees. However, most of their diet is made up of only a few species of eucalypt trees. The koala eats about one pound of leaves each day. This feeding starts at dusk. They obtain almost all of their water from the leaves that they eat.[img][/img]


    Thanks Elaniemay, Michela and Cameron. I love your creative artworks icon_biggrin.gif

    I'll bet it was lots of fun raiding the kitchen pantry for your Piping Shrike and Koala
    Bonnie G #2
    Thu Aug 09, 2012 11:46 am
    Food.com Groupie

    My DGD enjoyed learning about the Hairy nosed Wombat - and as she likes "colorful" she took the liberty of making a rainbow colored Wombat.


    The Wombat is the largest burrowing animal in the world. There are three types: the Common wombat, the Northern Hairy-nosed wombat and the Southern Hairy-nosed wombat

    All wombats are solitary animals and generally nocturnal. They spend most of the day sleeping alone in a burrow only coming out at night to eat grasses, plant roots and moss. Their strong teeth never stop growing and don't have roots. Even an old wombat has teeth that are strong enough to grind food.

    The female gives birth to one baby at a time. The blind hairless baby climbs through the mother's fur into her pouch

    [/img]
    AlainaF
    Thu Aug 09, 2012 3:20 pm
    Food.com Groupie


    After looking up animals of Australia and New Zealand, I saw a picture of this adorable little spiky animal called a Brown Kiwi, and knew it was the one. I drew the picture outline in marker, then I gave my 1 year old son Halen a couple markers and give the drawing his own artistic flair.



    The brown kiwi uses its sensitive tip at the end of their bill to locate food. They have great senses of touch and hearing, which also help them find food, and they mainly insects and berries.

    They live mainly in pairs and make their homes in forests, and they tend to hunt for insects at night.

    The Brown Kiwi is also one the the most celebrated birds of New Zealand, and also are New Zealand's national emblem.

    Here's my little man today:



    And here's what we created:

    awalde
    Thu Aug 09, 2012 4:46 pm
    Food.com Groupie

    DS is still 16 and but he doesn't like to paint a lot. For this reason he decided to make a kiwi bird from a kiwi fruit! He loves experimenting (especially with electronics objects but mechanics things as well) and he can find always a solution for "how to...".
    He completed the challange in this way:

    Kiwi are flightless birds endemic to New Zealand. The kiwi is a national symbol of New Zealand! At around the size of a domestic chicken, kiwi lay the largest egg in relation to their body size of any species of bird in the world. Kiwi are shy and usually nocturnal. Their mostly nocturnal habits may be a result of habitat intrusion by predators, including humans. Kiwi eat small invertebrates, seeds, grubs, and many varieties of worms. They also may eat fruit, small crayfish, eels and amphibians. Why are they called kiwi? Because they look like kiwi fruits? No! The kiwi gets its name from the Maori people's imitation of its cry.
    K9 Owned
    Fri Aug 10, 2012 11:25 am
    Forum Host



    I borrowed a child from our host ~Leslie~ 12 year old Sarah provided the artwork for this mini-tutorial and has titled the picture
    “Dingo with his back leg resting on a fallen tree”
    Photobucket

    The dingo is a wild dog unique to the continent of Australia, mainly found in the outback. Living largely apart from people and other dogs, together with the demands of Australian ecology, has caused them to develop features and instincts that distinguish them from all other canines. A Dingo’s natural habitat can range from deserts, to grasslands and on the verge of forests. They cannot live too far away from water and they normally settle their homes in dens, deserted rabbit holes, and hollow logs.
    About 170 species (from insects to buffalo) have been identified as being part of the dingo diet. Dietary composition varies from region to region. In the gulf region of Queensland, feral pigs and agile wallabies are the dingo's main prey. In the rain forests of the North, the main prey consists of magpie geese, rodents and agile wallabies. In the southern regions of the Northern Territory, the dogs mainly eat European rabbits, rodents, lizards, and red kangaroo; in arid central Australia, rabbits, rodents, lizards, red kangaroo, and cattle carcasses; and in the dry North-West, eastern wallaroos and red kangaroo. In the deserts of the South-West they primarily eat rabbits and in the eastern and south-eastern highlands wallabies, possums, and wombats.
    Dingoes in general drink one litre of water a day in the summer and about half a litre a day in winter. During the winter in arid regions, dingoes could potentially live from the liquid in the bodies of their prey, as long as the number of prey is sufficient.
    Cases in which dingoes in captivity have survived for up to 24 years have been recorded.
    The main causes of death for dingoes are killings by humans, crocodiles, and dogs, including other dingoes. Other causes of death include starvation and dehydration during times of drought or after strong bush fires, infanticide, snake bites, killing of cubs by wedge-tailed eagles, and injuries caused by cattle and buffalo
    Dingoes are susceptible to the same diseases as domestic dogs. At present, 38 species of parasites and pathogens have been detected in Australian dingoes. The bulk of these diseases have a minimal influence on their survival. The exceptions include canine distemper, hookworms, and heart worms in North Australia and southeastern Queensland. Dingo pups can also be killed by lungworms, whipworms, hepatitis, coccidiosis, lice, and ticks. Sarcoptic mange is a widespread parasitic disease among the dingoes of Australia, but is seldom debilitating. Free-roaming dogs are the primary host of Echinococcosis-tapeworms and have an infection rate of 70 to 90%.

    Submitted by Sarah and K9 Owned for the Bistro Babes
    **Jubes**
    Fri Aug 10, 2012 5:08 pm
    Forum Host
    Bonnie G #2 wrote:

    My DGD enjoyed learning about the Hairy nosed Wombat - and as she likes "colorful" she took the liberty of making a rainbow colored Wombat.


    The Wombat is the largest burrowing animal in the world. There are three types: the Common wombat, the Northern Hairy-nosed wombat and the Southern Hairy-nosed wombat

    All wombats are solitary animals and generally nocturnal. They spend most of the day sleeping alone in a burrow only coming out at night to eat grasses, plant roots and moss. Their strong teeth never stop growing and don't have roots. Even an old wombat has teeth that are strong enough to grind food.

    The female gives birth to one baby at a time. The blind hairless baby climbs through the mother's fur into her pouch

    [/img]


    Thankyou Bonnie and to your granddaughter . Great photos and I love the rainbow wombat icon_biggrin.gif
    **Jubes**
    Fri Aug 10, 2012 5:09 pm
    Forum Host
    AlainaF wrote:


    After looking up animals of Australia and New Zealand, I saw a picture of this adorable little spiky animal called a Brown Kiwi, and knew it was the one. I drew the picture outline in marker, then I gave my 1 year old son Halen a couple markers and give the drawing his own artistic flair.



    The brown kiwi uses its sensitive tip at the end of their bill to locate food. They have great senses of touch and hearing, which also help them find food, and they mainly insects and berries.

    They live mainly in pairs and make their homes in forests, and they tend to hunt for insects at night.

    The Brown Kiwi is also one the the most celebrated birds of New Zealand, and also are New Zealand's national emblem.

    Here's my little man today:



    And here's what we created:



    Great work Alaina and Halen !
    **Jubes**
    Fri Aug 10, 2012 5:12 pm
    Forum Host
    awalde wrote:

    DS is still 16 and but he doesn't like to paint a lot. For this reason he decided to make a kiwi bird from a kiwi fruit! He loves experimenting (especially with electronics objects but mechanics things as well) and he can find always a solution for "how to...".
    He completed the challange in this way:

    Kiwi are flightless birds endemic to New Zealand. The kiwi is a national symbol of New Zealand! At around the size of a domestic chicken, kiwi lay the largest egg in relation to their body size of any species of bird in the world. Kiwi are shy and usually nocturnal. Their mostly nocturnal habits may be a result of habitat intrusion by predators, including humans. Kiwi eat small invertebrates, seeds, grubs, and many varieties of worms. They also may eat fruit, small crayfish, eels and amphibians. Why are they called kiwi? Because they look like kiwi fruits? No! The kiwi gets its name from the Maori people's imitation of its cry.


    Thankyou awalde and to your son. I love that he used kiwifruit to creat a kiwi icon_biggrin.gif
    **Jubes**
    Fri Aug 10, 2012 5:13 pm
    Forum Host
    K9 Owned wrote:



    I borrowed a child from our host ~Leslie~ 12 year old Sarah provided the artwork for this mini-tutorial and has titled the picture
    “Dingo with his back leg resting on a fallen tree”
    Photobucket

    The dingo is a wild dog unique to the continent of Australia, mainly found in the outback. Living largely apart from people and other dogs, together with the demands of Australian ecology, has caused them to develop features and instincts that distinguish them from all other canines. A Dingo’s natural habitat can range from deserts, to grasslands and on the verge of forests. They cannot live too far away from water and they normally settle their homes in dens, deserted rabbit holes, and hollow logs.
    About 170 species (from insects to buffalo) have been identified as being part of the dingo diet. Dietary composition varies from region to region. In the gulf region of Queensland, feral pigs and agile wallabies are the dingo's main prey. In the rain forests of the North, the main prey consists of magpie geese, rodents and agile wallabies. In the southern regions of the Northern Territory, the dogs mainly eat European rabbits, rodents, lizards, and red kangaroo; in arid central Australia, rabbits, rodents, lizards, red kangaroo, and cattle carcasses; and in the dry North-West, eastern wallaroos and red kangaroo. In the deserts of the South-West they primarily eat rabbits and in the eastern and south-eastern highlands wallabies, possums, and wombats.
    Dingoes in general drink one litre of water a day in the summer and about half a litre a day in winter. During the winter in arid regions, dingoes could potentially live from the liquid in the bodies of their prey, as long as the number of prey is sufficient.
    Cases in which dingoes in captivity have survived for up to 24 years have been recorded.
    The main causes of death for dingoes are killings by humans, crocodiles, and dogs, including other dingoes. Other causes of death include starvation and dehydration during times of drought or after strong bush fires, infanticide, snake bites, killing of cubs by wedge-tailed eagles, and injuries caused by cattle and buffalo
    Dingoes are susceptible to the same diseases as domestic dogs. At present, 38 species of parasites and pathogens have been detected in Australian dingoes. The bulk of these diseases have a minimal influence on their survival. The exceptions include canine distemper, hookworms, and heart worms in North Australia and southeastern Queensland. Dingo pups can also be killed by lungworms, whipworms, hepatitis, coccidiosis, lice, and ticks. Sarcoptic mange is a widespread parasitic disease among the dingoes of Australia, but is seldom debilitating. Free-roaming dogs are the primary host of Echinococcosis-tapeworms and have an infection rate of 70 to 90%.

    Submitted by Sarah and K9 Owned for the Bistro Babes


    Thankyou K9Owned, Leslie and especially Sarah. Great work Sarah icon_biggrin.gif
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