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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Scandinavian Cooking / Baked Cheese
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    Baked Cheese

    pammyowl
    Tue May 15, 2012 12:28 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    What can anyone tell me about Finnish baked cheese? I will put the name from the the package here, but I don't know how to add the two dots on top of the last a in the word, sorry! Juustoleipa. Is it a dessert or an appetizer, how should I serve it? I saw it at my co-op and was intrigued so I bought it, but now I don't know what to do with it! icon_lol.gif
    stormylee
    Tue May 15, 2012 3:56 pm
    Forum Host
    pammyowl wrote:
    What can anyone tell me about Finnish baked cheese? I will put the name from the the package here, but I don't know how to add the two dots on top of the last a in the word, sorry! Juustoleipa. Is it a dessert or an appetizer, how should I serve it? I saw it at my co-op and was intrigued so I bought it, but now I don't know what to do with it! icon_lol.gif


    Mia in Germany just asked the same question in the coffee thread above! icon_lol.gif Leipäjuusto is primarily treated as something-to-have-with-coffee: you can just slice it up and have it as-is. The cheese is not particularly sweet though, so you might want to add a bit of something to it. It goes very well with sweet berries: cloudberries are the #1 choice, but other berries work just as well, as do jams.

    A very traditional way of enjoying leipäjuusto with coffee is to cut the cheese into cubes, put the cubes into a coffee cup, fill the cup with coffee, sip the coffee, and then enjoy the warm, coffee-soaked cheese cubes last. icon_smile.gif

    As a dessert, you can cut the cheese into single servings, place the pieces into a pie dish, pour a cup (give or take!) of heavy cream on top, and bake at 200 C for about 20 minutes (until the cheese has softened). Serve with berries or jam. yummy.gif

    Because the cheese itself is quite neutral-tasting, it also works well in salads. It's a bit like mozzarella in that sense, but I think leipäjuusto works better than mozzarella if there's something sweet in a salad, like grapes, melon or strawberries. Add lettuce, cucumber, a bit of red onion, cherry tomatoes, whatever you fancy!
    stormylee
    Tue May 15, 2012 4:08 pm
    Forum Host
    Oh! And there are regional differences in the name and I come from the leipäjuusto area myself, which is why I called it that - it is also called juustoleipä, as it says on the package! icon_smile.gif
    pammyowl
    Tue May 15, 2012 4:09 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Thanks for the ideas! I love the coffee idea, being a coffee junkie. The salad sounds incredible,too. Hmm, I also like the idea of baking with preserves. Oh, dear, I may have to get another block!
    pammyowl
    Tue May 15, 2012 11:14 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I looked up cloudberries the other day. Is it true each bush has only one Berry? Wow, they most be expensive! icon_lol.gif
    stormylee
    Wed May 16, 2012 1:28 am
    Forum Host
    Yup! And cloudberries typically grow in swamps, so picking them is no picnic either - they do cost quite a bit.

    pammyowl
    Wed May 16, 2012 1:42 am
    Food.com Groupie
    They look really good. What flavor would you compare them to,a berry that grows here in the states?
    stormylee
    Wed May 16, 2012 2:10 am
    Forum Host
    Hmm, a tough one! They have the same seedy-crunchiness going on as raspberries (they are firmer than raspberries, though), but they taste more like a tarter variety of apples, really. Unlike most other berries, cloudberries do not, in my opinion, fare well in sweet products like jams or liqueurs - somehow the sugar does not enhance the flavour of the berry but turns it into something else entirely. It's all a matter of taste, of course, but I think it's safe to say that eating fresh or frozen and thawed cloudberries is a very different experience, taste-wise, than eating cloudberry jam.
    pammyowl
    Wed May 16, 2012 2:17 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Would you compare them to lingonberries?
    stormylee
    Wed May 16, 2012 3:32 am
    Forum Host
    Not really - lingonberries are far more tart than cloudberries.
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