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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Scandinavian Cooking / Coffee in Scandinavia
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    Coffee in Scandinavia

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    stormylee
    Wed May 02, 2012 3:20 am
    Forum Host
    Mia in Germany wrote:
    To start with, I made Norwegian Drop Cookies #172374 by Charlotte J.
    They are very tasy, just how I like them yummy.gif
    I realised that nutmeg is extremely popular in the US - way too much for my taste. Do Scandinavian recipes also use so much of it that you can taste it? Which spices are the most popular ones in baked goods? I saw a lot of cardamom recipes.


    Nutmeg doesn't seem to feature much in Nordic recipes - it makes an appearance in spice cakes and casseroles, but I don't think I've seen a recipe that calls for more than 1/4 ts. icon_smile.gif Cardamom is popular (now, what is sweet wheat bread without cardamom?? icon_wink.gif), as is cinnamon. Another traditional spice is ground bitter orange peel - it's used in spice cakes, gingerbread cookies, mulled wine and various Christmassy breads.
    Mia in Germany
    Wed May 02, 2012 3:27 am
    Forum Host
    stormylee wrote:

    Nutmeg doesn't seem to feature much in Nordic recipes - it makes an appearance in spice cakes and casseroles, but I don't think I've seen a recipe that calls for more than 1/4 ts. icon_smile.gif Cardamom is popular (now, what is sweet wheat bread without cardamom?? icon_wink.gif), as is cinnamon. Another traditional spice is ground bitter orange peel - it's used in spice cakes, gingerbread cookies, mulled wine and various Christmassy breads.


    Oh, wow, cardamom in white bread?? I can't do that with wheat, but maybe I can magic it into something gluten free. Is there a recipe somewhere for this kind of bread? I love cardamom and cinnamon yummy.gif
    stormylee
    Wed May 02, 2012 4:01 am
    Forum Host
    Any recipe for Nordic cinnamon rolls, for example, and any recipes based on the same yeast dough - like the Boston coffee cake in the recipe section. Probably not the easiest ones to make gluten-free though. icon_confused.gif Wonder if Lilla has ventured into gluten-free yeast baking?
    stormylee
    Fri May 04, 2012 2:39 pm
    Forum Host
    Oh, a blast from the past, just in time for Friday - Hot Shots were all the rage back in the early 90's! icon_biggrin.gif Coffee, Galliano and whipped cream...

    Icelandic Hot Shot
    Mia in Germany
    Tue May 08, 2012 1:13 am
    Forum Host
    I seem to have heard of this drink here, too.While I love my coffee strong, it kills me with alcohol added! The only occasion I would use decaf - to try how it tastes with liquor icon_lol.gif
    stormylee
    Wed May 09, 2012 1:31 pm
    Forum Host
    Just found this decadent coffee recipe - Swedish Spiced Cardamom Coffee With Chantilly Whipped Cream. Cardamom coffee and cognac flavoured cream, oh my! yummy.gif

    I'll be drinking coffee in Copenhagen this weekend and I'll leave tomorrow after work, so will be MIA for a few days! Therefore, this week's Friday vice is posted bright and early, i.e. right now... How about enjoying some Viking blood this weekend? icon_biggrin.gif

    Viking Blood Cocktail

    Mia in Germany
    Wed May 09, 2012 1:36 pm
    Forum Host
    Now *that* combination sounds strange icon_eek.gif I love aquavit, I like coffee liqueur and I like lemon flavour. But a combination of all three - ? Seems like I have to give it a try.

    Have great weekend in Kopenhagen!
    wave.gif
    stormylee
    Mon May 14, 2012 3:28 pm
    Forum Host
    WELL, I went to Denmark and didn't have a single Danish Danish! icon_eek.gif Now what's that about? I did have coffee and cakes though, such as...


    ... apple crumble...


    ... cheesecake...

    and had such a hard time deciding what to choose at Lagkagehuset...





    ... and decided on the wonderfully airy and fluffy coconut ball:


    yummy.gif Good times, great coffee, delicious cakes!
    stormylee
    Tue May 15, 2012 5:50 am
    Forum Host
    Mia in Germany wrote:
    Now *that* combination sounds strange icon_eek.gif I love aquavit, I like coffee liqueur and I like lemon flavour. But a combination of all three - ? Seems like I have to give it a try.



    Did you try it yet? icon_smile.gif It's weird how combinations work - sometimes a few of my favourite things put together produce something that is not to my liking... I love ice cream and I love chocolate, but I don't care for chocolate ice cream - go figure! On the other hand, I don't like Jägermeister and I can't stand energy drinks, but I'm very partial to the cocktail that combines them (called "battery acid" in Finland; named after the Finnish energy drink called Battery - I'm sure the drink exists elsewhere too!).
    Mia in Germany
    Tue May 15, 2012 6:04 am
    Forum Host
    stormylee wrote:
    Mia in Germany wrote:
    Now *that* combination sounds strange icon_eek.gif I love aquavit, I like coffee liqueur and I like lemon flavour. But a combination of all three - ? Seems like I have to give it a try.



    Did you try it yet? icon_smile.gif It's weird how combinations work - sometimes a few of my favourite things put together produce something that is not to my liking... I love ice cream and I love chocolate, but I don't care for chocolate ice cream - go figure! On the other hand, I don't like Jägermeister and I can't stand energy drinks, but I'm very partial to the cocktail that combines them (called "battery acid" in Finland; named after the Finnish energy drink called Battery - I'm sure the drink exists elsewhere too!).


    I'm going to get the Aquavit tomorrow when I do the grocery shopping! I'm totally curious.
    This Jaegermeister / Energy drink cocktail exists here, too, and I know astonishingly many people who like it.
    Funny with the ice cream - same here, chocolate lover who doesn't like chocolate ice cream.

    I have another question: A friend asked me about leipäjuusto. She has some and wanted to know what to do with it. I haven't heard of it before and read that it's eaten with lingonberry preserves or something, like cheesecake. Do you know how to prepare it?
    stormylee
    Tue May 15, 2012 3:59 pm
    Forum Host
    Mia in Germany wrote:

    I have another question: A friend asked me about leipäjuusto. She has some and wanted to know what to do with it. I haven't heard of it before and read that it's eaten with lingonberry preserves or something, like cheesecake. Do you know how to prepare it?


    Leipäjuusto is primarily treated as something-to-have-with-coffee: you can just slice it up and have it as-is. The cheese is not particularly sweet though, so you might want to add a bit of something to it. It goes very well with sweet berries: cloudberries are the #1 choice, but other berries work just as well, as do jams.

    A very traditional way of enjoying leipäjuusto with coffee is to cut the cheese into cubes, put the cubes into a coffee cup, fill the cup with coffee, sip the coffee, and then enjoy the warm, coffee-soaked cheese cubes last. icon_smile.gif

    As a dessert, you can cut the cheese into single servings, place the pieces into a pie dish, pour a cup (give or take!) of heavy cream on top, and bake at 200 C for about 20 minutes (until the cheese has softened). Serve with berries or jam. yummy.gif

    Because the cheese itself is quite neutral-tasting, it also works well in salads. It's a bit like mozzarella in that sense, but I think leipäjuusto works better than mozzarella if there's something sweet in a salad, like grapes, melon or strawberries. Add lettuce, cucumber, a bit of red onion, cherry tomatoes, whatever you fancy!

    Your friend and pammyowl can then compare notes! icon_biggrin.gif She just asked about leipäjuusto in another thread, too!
    Mia in Germany
    Wed May 16, 2012 12:27 am
    Forum Host
    stormylee wrote:
    Mia in Germany wrote:

    I have another question: A friend asked me about leipäjuusto. She has some and wanted to know what to do with it. I haven't heard of it before and read that it's eaten with lingonberry preserves or something, like cheesecake. Do you know how to prepare it?


    Leipäjuusto is primarily treated as something-to-have-with-coffee: you can just slice it up and have it as-is. The cheese is not particularly sweet though, so you might want to add a bit of something to it. It goes very well with sweet berries: cloudberries are the #1 choice, but other berries work just as well, as do jams.

    A very traditional way of enjoying leipäjuusto with coffee is to cut the cheese into cubes, put the cubes into a coffee cup, fill the cup with coffee, sip the coffee, and then enjoy the warm, coffee-soaked cheese cubes last. icon_smile.gif

    As a dessert, you can cut the cheese into single servings, place the pieces into a pie dish, pour a cup (give or take!) of heavy cream on top, and bake at 200 C for about 20 minutes (until the cheese has softened). Serve with berries or jam. yummy.gif

    Because the cheese itself is quite neutral-tasting, it also works well in salads. It's a bit like mozzarella in that sense, but I think leipäjuusto works better than mozzarella if there's something sweet in a salad, like grapes, melon or strawberries. Add lettuce, cucumber, a bit of red onion, cherry tomatoes, whatever you fancy!

    Your friend and pammyowl can then compare notes! icon_biggrin.gif She just asked about leipäjuusto in another thread, too!


    icon_redface.gif icon_lol.gif
    It was pammyowl who asked me in the first place! Then I talked to a friend who is totally fond of Finland and even learns Finnish but she didn't know how to prepare this cheese either. She'll be delighted - thanks for the info! There seems to be a store in Munich where she can get Finnish products.
    stormylee
    Wed May 16, 2012 1:18 am
    Forum Host
    Oh, too funny!! icon_lol.gif Well, now pammyowl knows twice! icon_wink.gif
    Mia in Germany
    Wed May 16, 2012 1:36 am
    Forum Host
    icon_lol.gif
    There's no chance that this cheese exsists from sheep or goat's milk, too, is it? I've read all this stuff and really start wantig some icon_lol.gif
    stormylee
    Wed May 16, 2012 3:31 am
    Forum Host
    I've seen both goat and sheep milk leipäjuusto too - don't know if they're exported, though! Why not try making your own? icon_biggrin.gif

    Juusota - Finnish " Squeaky" Cheese
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