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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Asian Cooking / How to spot noodle in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean
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    How to spot noodle in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean

    Rinshinomori
    Tue Apr 24, 2012 12:26 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    If you see this word mian or mien as in zha jiang mian, it's Chinese for noodle. This noodle is often translated as brown bean sauce noodle in the US.

    In Japanese noodle is called men or menrui as in jajamen - same dish as above. Within men types or menrui, there are soba, udon, ramen, etc.

    In Korean, it's known as myeon as in jajangmyeon - although this dish has the similar ja ja or ja jang or zha jiang beginning, it's closer to stir fried noodles unlike meat sauce topping of China and Japan.
    Leggy Peggy
    Tue Apr 24, 2012 6:32 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Rinshinomori, thanks for your explanations. I could have used them last year when we were travelling in China/Asia. Interestingly, on our long travels
    across Asia, one of the first things we tried to learn was the names of some
    basic dishes we might be ordering. Noodles was darn high up the list.
    mickeydownunder
    Wed Apr 25, 2012 3:11 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Rinshinomori wrote:
    If you see this word mian or mien as in zha jiang mian, it's Chinese for noodle. This noodle is often translated as brown bean sauce noodle in the US.

    In Japanese noodle is called men or menrui as in jajamen - same dish as above. Within men types or menrui, there are soba, udon, ramen, etc.

    In Korean, it's known as myeon as in jajangmyeon - although this dish has the similar ja ja or ja jang or zha jiang beginning, it's closer to stir fried noodles unlike meat sauce topping of China and Japan.


    VERY interesting information as only learnt things like this when taking a pen and paper to the local asian store , writing things down and asking "What's this? lol

    Thanks !
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